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Full text of "Bridgewater State College : undergraduate/graduate catalogue"

BSC 

BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



HKII X.I » M I 14 
M M I < (>l I I (.1 



Expect More. Achieve More. 



This 2008-2009 Bridgewater State College 
Catalog outlines programs of study. 
This catalog can also be 
referenced on the college's Web site at 
www.bridgew.edu 

The rules, regulations, policies, fees and other charges, courses of study, and academic require- 
ments that appear in this catalog were in effect at the time of its publication. Like everything else 
in this catalog, they are published for informational purposes only, and they do not constitute a 
contract between the college and any student, applicant for admission or other person. 

Whether noted elsewhere in this catalog or not, the college reserves the right to change, 
eliminate, and add to any existing (and to introduce additional) rules, regulations, policies, fees and 
other charges, courses of study and academic requirements. Whenever it does so, the college will 
give as much advance notice as it considers feasible or appropriate, but it reserves the right in all 
cases to do so without notice. 

STATEMENT OF STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 

The college catalog is made available to Bridgewater State College students. In all cases, the 
student bears ultimate responsibility for reading the catalog and following the academic policies 
and regulations of the college. A copy of the college catalog may be obtained by contacting the 
Admissions Office or may be viewed on the Web at www.bridgew.edu. 



For the most up-to-date catalog information, including changes or corrections to 
curriculum, course descriptions, and tuition and fees, see the BSC Catalog Web Addenda 
at www.bridgew.edu/catdlog/dddenda/. The Web addenda should be used in conjunction 
with the 2008-2009 Bridgewater State College Catalog. Information in the Catalog Web 
Addenda supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



About the College 



Since the time of its founding in 1 840, the college has remained steadfast in its commitment to 
empower individuals and to instill in its students and faculty a deep appreciation for the public good. 
Upon this enduring foundation are built the following strategic priorities for the 2 1 st century: fostering 
a rigorous and dynamic academic environment marked by intensive student-faculty engagement; establishing 
regional leadership in preparing students for challenging and emerging careers and graduate study; enhanc- 
ing campus participation in diverse and global society; strengthening institutional relationships with 
regional partners; and developing sufficient resources for an attractive, well-staffed and technologically 
updated campus. 

As the comprehensive public college of Southeastern Massachusetts, Bridgewater State College has a 
responsibility to educate the residents of Southeastern Massachusetts and the commonwealth, and to use its 
intellectual, scientific and technological resources to support and advance the economic and cultural life of 
the region and the state. 

While maintaining its historic focus on the preparation of teachers, Bridgewater State College provides 
a broad range of baccalaureate degree programs through its School of Arts and Sciences, its School of 
Education and Allied Studies and its School of Business. At the graduate level, the college offers the Master 
of Arts and Master of Science in select disciplines, as well as the Master of Arts in Teaching, the Master of 
Education, the Master of Public Administration, the Master of Science in Management and the Master of 
Social Work. In addition, Bridgewater State College prepares current and future educators for postbaccalaure- 
ate and postmaster's licensure. 

Through the extensive information technology and distance education resources available at Bridgewater 
State College, including the unique John Joseph Moakley Center for Technological Applications, the college 
has made technology an integral component of teaching and learning on campus, and seeks to become a 
regional center for the enhancement of teaching through technology for PreK- 1 2 teachers and college faculty. 

The college's growing number of innovative academic programs helps to ensure that Bridgewater State 
College students are prepared to think critically, communicate effectively and act responsibly within a 
context of personal and professional ethics. For example, BSC's Academic Achievement Center, and particu- 
larly its first-year advising program, is often cited as a model for other institutions to follow. At the same 
time, the Adrian Tinsley Program for Undergraduate Research represents an unparalleled opportunity for 
students to work closely with faculty mentors and to present research and creative work at regional and 
national conferences. 

Bridgewater State College benefits greatly from Connect, its regional partnership with other public higher 
education institutions in the region - the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, Massachusetts Maritime 
Academy, Massasoit Community College, Bristol Community College and Cape Cod Community College. 
Connect functions as a vehicle for coordinating the academic, administrative and development activities 
of public higher education in Southeastern Massachusetts, and introduces shared activities and programs 
among member institutions. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at wwwbridgew.edu/catalog/dddenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



bSc 

BRIDGE WATER 

TATE COIXBGE 



Table of Contents 



About the College 1 

Table of Contents 2 

Academic Calendar 4 

History of the College 5 

COLLEGE COMPLIANCE 

POLICIES 6 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 10 

Undergraduate 10 

Graduate 11 

THE EDUCATIONAL 

ENVIRONMENT 12 

The Faculty 12 

Clement C. Maxwell Library 1 2 

Departmental Resources 12 

Disability Resources 12 

The Online World and Technology 12 

International Study Tours 13 

Cross Registration Programs 13 

UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC 

EXPERIENCE 14 

Learning Resources 14 

Technological Resources 15 

Opportunities for Learning Beyond 

the Classroom 15 

Campus Life 17 

UNDERGRADUATE 

ADMISSION 19 

Freshman Admission Requirements 1 9 

Transfer Admission Requirements 20 

Joint Admission Program 20 

Commonwealth Transfer Compact ...20 

Decision and Notification Dates 21 

Reinstatement and Readmission 21 

International Admission 22 

Program for Registered Nurses 22 

New England Regional Student 

Program 22 

Advanced Standing 22 

Advanced Placement Program 22 

College-Level Examination 

Program (CLEP) 22 

Second Degree Option 24 

Non-Degree Status 24 

TUITION AND FEES 25 

Application Fees 25 

Tuition and Fees 25 

Semester Residence Hall and 

Dining Charges 26 

Tuition Management Plan 26 

Refund Policy 26 

Return of Financial Aid Policy 27 

Tuition and Fees Summary 28 



FINANCIAL AID 30 

Satisfactory Academic Progress and 

Student Financial Aid 30 

Student Employment 31 

Alumni Scholarships 31 

Graduate Assistantships 31 

Other Scholarships 31 

Veterans' Affairs 31 

Air Force ROTC 32 

UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC 

PROGRAMS 33 

Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science 33 

Bachelor of Science in Education 33 

Major 33 

Double Major 33 

Concentration 34 

Minor 34 

Core Curriculum Requirements 35 

Directed Study 41 

Internship, Practicum and Field 

Experience 41 

Honors Program 42 

Commonwealth Honors 42 

Departmental Honors 43 

Scholarships 43 

Honors Center 43 

Honors Events 43 

Honor Societies 43 

Interdisciplinary Programs 43 

UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC 

POLICIES 44 

Academic Integrity and Classroom 

Conduct Pollicy 44 

Academic Standards 45 

Academic Probation 45 

Academic Separation 45 

Satisfactory Academic Progress 45 

Awarding of Undergraduate Degrees. .46 

Commencement Ceremony 46 

Degree Application 46 

Graduation Requirements 46 

Graduation with Honors 47 

Grading System 47 

Audit 47 

Change of Grade 47 

Dean's List 47 

Grade Point Average 47 

Incomplete 48 

Mid-Semester Warning Notices 48 

Repeat Courses 48 

Registration and Enrollment Policies ...48 
Attendance Policy 48 



Change/Declaration of 

Concentration 48 

Change/Declaration of Major for 

Freshmen 48 

Change of Major for 

Upperclassmen 49 

Change/Declaration of Minor 49 

Classification Designation 49 

Course Audit 49 

Course Drops and Adds 49 

Course Load 49 

Credit by Examination 49 

Intercollegiate Athletics Eligibility. . 50 
Make-up Tests and Examinations ...50 

Prerequisites 50 

Registration 50 

Transfer of Credit after Admission ..51 

Withdrawal from the College 51 

Withdrawal from Courses following 

the Drop/Add Period 51 

SCHOOL OF GRADUATE 

STUDIES 52 

General Policies and Procedures 52 

Academic Integrity 52 

Academic Dismissal 53 

Academic Probation 53 

Academic Standing for Graduate 

Students 53 

Appeals 53 

Change of Grade 53 

Change of Name and/or Address . . 53 

Comprehensive Examination 53 

Continuation or Interruption of 

Course Registration 54 

Course Drops and Adds 54 

Course Loads 54 

Course Registration 54 

Deadlines 54 

Directed or Independent Study 55 

Grading System 55 

Graduate and Undergraduate 

Credit 55 

Graduate Assistantships 55 

Graduate Research Assistantship ...55 

Graduation Application 55 

Graduation Dates 56 

Graduation Requirements 56 

Immunization Requirements for 

Graduate Students 56 

Incomplete 56 

Program and Course Prerequisites 56 

Repeat Course Policy 56 

Research 56 



Table of Contents 



Satisfactory or Reasonable Progress 56 

Statute of Limitations - Program 

and Courses 56 

Thesis 57 

Transfer Credit 57 

Withdrawal from Courses 58 

Withdrawal from the College 58 

Graduate Programs 58 

Master of Arts 58 

Master of Arts in Teaching 58 

Master of Education 58 

Master of Public Administration 58 

Master of Science 59 

Master of Science in Management. ..59 

Master of Social Work 59 

Certificate of Advanced Graduate 

Study 59 

Doctor of Education 59 

Postbaccalaureate Licensure 

Programs 59 

Postmaster's Licensure Programs 59 

Educator Licensure 59 

Graduate Certificate Programs 60 

GRADUATE ADMISSION 60 

Admission Standards 60 

Postbaccalaureate Licensure 

Programs 60 

Accelerated Postbaccalaureate 

Licensure Program 60 

Master of Arts in Teaching 61 

Master's Degree Programs 61 

CAGS and Postmaster's Licensure 

Programs 62 

Application Procedures 62 

International Student Admission 

Requirements 63 

Admission Decisions 63 

Action by the Department 63 

Action by the Educator 

Licensure Office 63 

Action by the School of Graduate 

Studies 64 

Change in Program 64 

Graduate Advisers and Graduate 

Program Planning 64 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 

REQUIREMENTS 64 

Master of Arts 64 

Master of Arts in Teaching 64 

Master of Education 64 

Master of Public Administration 65 

Master of Science 65 

Master of Science in Management 65 



Master of Social Work 65 

Certificate of Advanced Graduate 

Study 65 

Collaborative CAGS/EdD Program 65 

SCHOOL OF ARTS AND 

SCIENCES 66 

Undergraduate Programs 67 

Graduate Programs 68 

Department of Anthropology 69 

Department of Art 72 

Department of Biological Sciences 76 

Department of Chemical Sciences 82 

Department of Communication 

Studies 85 

Department of Criminal Justice 89 

Department of Earth Sciences 93 

Department of English 97 

Department of Foreign Languages ....102 

Department of Geography 105 

Department of History 108 

Department of Mathematics and 

Computer Science 114 

Department of Music 118 

Department of Philosophy 122 

Department of Physics 1 24 

Department of Political Science 127 

Department of Psychology 133 

Department of Social Work 1 38 

Department of Sociology 142 

Department of Theater and Dance ....145 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 149 

Department of Accounting and 

Finance 150 

Department of Aviation Science 1 54 

Department of Economics 1 57 

Department of Management 158 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

AND ALLIED STUDIES 162 

Undergraduate Programs 163 

Postbaccalaureate, Graduate and 

Postmaster's Programs 163 

Licensure of Educational 

Personnel 164 

Admission to and Retention in 

Professional Education Programs - 

Undergraduate Students 165 

Admission to and Retention in 

Professional Education Programs - 

Postbaccalaureate/Graduate 

Students 166 



Admission to, Retention in and Exit 
from Professional Education 
Programs - MAT, MEd, CAGS 167 



MEd PreK-1 2 Education (For 

Educators in Non-U.S. Settings) 168 

CAGS in Education 168 

Collaborative CAGS/EdD Program 168 

Department of Counselor 

Education 169 

Department of Elementary and Early 

Childhood Education 176 

Department of Movement Arts, Health 

Promotion and Leisure Studies 184 

Department of Secondary Education 

and Professional Programs 200 

Undergraduate Programs 200 

Graduate Programs 202 

Accelerated Postbaccalaureate 
Program (APB) 203 

Master of Arts in Teaching 203 

Educational Leadership Graduate 
Program 204 

Library Media Graduate 

Program 207 

Instructional Technology 

Graduate Program 207 

Department of Special Education and 

Communication Disorders 209 

INTERDISCIPLINARY AND 

PREPROFESSIONAL 

PROGRAMS 218 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 228 

Course Numbering System 228 

Core Curriculum Notations 228 

Prerequisite Notations 228 

Semester Notations 228 

Former Course Number Notations 228 

Cross-Listed Courses 228 

Meeting Times 228 

CORE CURRICULUM COURSE 

NOTATIONS 229 

COURSE SUBJECT CODE 

KEY 230 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 231 

Board of Trustees 429 

Officers of the College 430 

Administrative and Other College 

Offices 431 

Faculty 434 

Librarians 447 

Index 448 

Map 452 

Accreditations and 

Certifications Inside back cover 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bndgew.edu/catalog/addendd/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Academic Calendar 



The regular academic year consists of two semesters (fall and 
spring) of approximately 1 5 weeks each The college also holds 
two summer sessions of approximately five weeks each. 

FALL SEMESTER -2008 



February 

16 (Monday) 
18 (Wednesday) 



September 

1 (Monday) 
3 (Wednesday) 
17 (Wednesday) 

October 

13 (Monday) 

21 (Tuesday) 

22 (Wednesday) 

November 

1 1 (Tuesday) 

12 (Wednesday) 

26 (Wednesday) 



December 

I (Monday) 

9 (Tuesday) 

10 (Wednesday) 

II (Thursday) 

12 (Friday) 

15 (Monday) 

17 (Wednesday) 

18 (Thursday) 



Labor Day - No classes 

Fall classes begin 

Senior Convocation 

(1 2:20 pm classes only are cancelled) 

Columbus Day - No classes 
End of first quarter 
Beginning of second quarter 

Veterans' Day - No classes 

Tuesday schedule of classes 
(Wednesday classes will not 
meet on 1 1/12) 

Thanksgiving recess begins at the 

close of day classes. 

Evening classes will not be held. 

Classes resume 

Tuesday evening class final exam 

Fall semester day classes end 

Reading Day (day classes only); 
Thursday evening class final exam 

Fall semester day final exams begin 

Monday evening class final exam 

Wednesday evening class final exam 

Fall semester day final exams end 



SPRING SEMESTER - 2009 



January 

19 (Monday) 

21 (Wednesday) 
30 (Friday) 



Martin Luther King Jr. Day - 

No classes 

Spring classes begin 

Winter Undergraduate 
Commencement 



March 


9 


(Monday) 


13 


(Friday) 


16 


(Monday) 


i 7 


(Tuesday) 


1 Q 


(weanesaay; 


April 




20 


(Monday) 


30 


(Thursday) 


May 




4 


(Monday) 


5 


(Tuesday) 


6 


(Wednesday) 


11 


(Monday) 


12 


(Tuesday) 


13 


(Wednesday) 


16 


(Saturday) 



Presidents' Day - No classes 
Monday schedule of classes 
(Wednesday classes will not meet on 
2/18) 

Spring break begins 
Spring break ends 
Classes resume 
End of third quarter 
Beginning of fourth quarter 

Patriots' Day - No classes 
Thursday evening class final exam 

Spring semester day classes end 
Reading Day (day classes only); 
Tuesday evening class final exam 
Spring semester day final exams begin, 
Wednesday evening class final exam 

Monday evening class final exam 
Spring semester day final exams end 
Spring Graduate Commencement 
Spring Undergraduate 
Commencement 



SUMMER SEMESTER - 2009 



May 

26 (Tuesday) 

June 

29 (Monday) 

July 

6 (Monday) 

August 

7 (Friday) 



Summer Session I classes begin 



Summer Session I classes end 



Summer Session II classes begin 



Summer Session II classes end 



History of the College 



Founded by American public education pioneer Horace Mann in 
1840, Bridgewater State College has grown from its first home 
- a single room in the basement of Bridgewater Town Hall - to 
become the largest of the nine Massachusetts state colleges and 
the fourth largest of the 29 public college and university 
campuses in the commonwealth. 

Approximately 10,000 full-time and part-time undergraduate 
and graduate students are enrolled at the college; the full-time 
faculty numbers 300-plus, representing a net gain of more than 
50 since 2002; and more than 90 undergraduate and graduate 
programs are offered by the college's four schools (School of Arts 
and Sciences, School of Education and Allied Studies, School of 
Business and School of Graduate Studies). The 270-acre campus 
is home to 38 academic, administrative and residential buildings. 

Alumni and friends have raised more than $ 1 7 million to 
support faculty and student research, a myriad of undergradu- 
ate and graduate scholarships, international study opportunities 
and award-winning publications. These private investments 
complement growing levels of public support for the institution. 
In recent years, the college and the commonwealth have com- 
mitted nearly $3 million for classroom upgrades, $7 million for an 
extensive library renovation and $38 million for a new residence 
hall. Over the next several years, the college plans to complete a 
top-to-bottom renovation and expansion of two residence halls, 
modernize its athletic facilities and construct a $ 1 00-million 
science facility. 

Vital to the long-term success of the institution is its recogni- 
tion throughout the state and nation as an educational leader 
in the use of technology to improve teaching and learning. The 
first step in that direction took place in 1992, when Bridgewater 
State College secured a $ 1 0-million federal grant - at the time, 
the largest federal grant ever awarded to a state college in the 
United States - to build what has become the John Joseph 
Moakley Center for Technological Applications. Today, all incom- 
ing students are required to carry and use notebook comput- 
ers. For two consecutive years, Yahoo! Internet Life magazine 
named Bridgewater State College among the "100 Most-Wired 
Universities and Colleges in America," and the college earned the 
number six spot on Intel Corporation's "Most Unwired College 
Campuses Survey" in 2005. 



Together, these developments have combined to strengthen 
the college's academic mission and expand its public service role 
They were built on a series of initiatives that trace back to 1 960, 
a watershed year in the life of the college. It was then that the 
college began making a full-scale transition from an exclusively 
teacher-training institution to a comprehensive liberal arts 
college, offering students a variety of academic disciplines at the 
undergraduate and graduate level. 

Until that time, the college had been relatively small - approx 
imately 500 students - but enjoyed a national and international 
reputation for excellence in teacher preparation. The preparation 
of the next generation of quality teachers remains a top priority 
for Bridgewater State College, as evidenced by the institution's 
celebration of 50 years of accreditation by the National Council 
for Accreditation of Teacher Education. 

During its time as a normal school, countless faculty and 
administrators nurtured the school carefully, despite varying 
degrees of support from the state, and overcame a host of 
difficult and sometimes dire situations, including a disastrous 
fire in 1 924 that destroyed several of the few buildings that 
existed on the campus at that time. 

While the college's earliest years were times of great 
challenge, the efforts never flagged to continue strengthening 
the curriculum, and each succeeding generation left Bridgewater 
State College stronger than the generation that went before. 
The thriving and dynamic institution we see today is the best 
evidence of the success of that enduring commitment. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at wwwbndgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this cataiog 




BRIDCEWATER 

STATE COLLEGE 



College Compliance Policies 



The material that folbws includes a summary of the federal and 
state legal requirements and specific college policies related to 
nondiscrimination, harassment, hazing, alcohol and drug polices, 
safety and security measures and confidentiality of student records 
For a copy of the complete policy statements or further information, 
please contact the appropriate office as indicated in each 
policy section 

POLICY ON NONDISCRIMINATION AND 
AFFIRMATIVE ACTION 

Bridgewater State College does not discriminate in admission 
to or access to, or treatment or employment in, any of its 
educational programs or activities, including scholarships, loans 
and athletics, on basis of race, color, creed, religion, national 
origin, gender, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, 
genetic information, marital status, political belief or affilia- 
tion, or veteran status. The college complies with executive 
orders 1 1 246 and 1 1 375 as amended; the Civil Rights Act of 
1 964 as amended; the Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1 988; 
the Civil Rights Act of 1 99 1 ; Title IX of the Higher Education 
Amendments of 1972 as amended; Sections 503 and 504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1 973, the Americans with Disabilities Act 
of 1990; Section 402 of the Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment 
Assistance Act of 1974; and pertinent laws, regulations and 
executive orders; directives of the Board of Higher Education; the 
Boards of Trustees of the Massachusetts State Colleges and the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts; and other applicable local, 
state and federal statutes. 

Anyone believing that he or she has experienced discrimina- 
tion and/or adverse treatment may register a complaint with 
the Office of Affirmative Action, Boyden Hall, Room 226, 
508.53 1 . 1 24 1 ; the vice president for student affairs, Boyden 
Hall, Room 1 06, 508.53 1.1 276, TTY 508.53 1 . 1 384, or write to 
the Office for Civil Rights, Washington, D.C. 

For specific information regarding college policies related to 
racial harassment, sexual harassment or disabilities discrimina- 
tion, please contact the Office of Affirmative Action, Minority 
Affairs and Equal Opportunity, the Office of Student Affairs or 
refer to the Bridgewater State College Student Handbook. 

CONFIDENTIALITY OF STUDENT RECORDS 

Bridgewater State College complies with the Family Educational 
Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1 974 which governs access 
to and release of information contained in student educational 
records. Students have the right to review their educational 
records, request the amendment of their records if they believe 
that inaccuracies exist, and consent to disclosures of personally 
identifiable information contained in their records. Students also 
have the right to file written complaints with the U.S. Department 
of Education, Family Policy Compliance Office, concerning alleged 
violations of this act. Additional information regarding this act 
may be found in the Bridgewater State College Student 
Handbook and on the Web (www.bridgew.edu/registrar). For 
specific questions, please contact the Registrar's Office, Boyden 
Hall, Room 003. 



THE JEANNE CLERY DISCLOSURE OF 
CAMPUS SECURITY POLICY AND CAMPUS 
CRIME STATISTICS ACT 

Bridgewater State College complies with the Jeanne Clery 
Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime 
Statistics Act, a federal law that requires colleges and universities 
across the United States to disclose information about crime on 
and around their campuses. 

Annual Report 

Colleges have to publish an annual report every year by Oct. 1 
that contains three years of campus crime statistics and also 
certain security policy statements including sexual assault poli- 
cies, the law enforcement authority of campus police, and where 
students should go to report crimes. These statistics and policy 
statements may be found in the Bndgewater State College 
Student Handbook. 

Crime Statistics 

Colleges must disdose cnme statistics for the campus, public areas 
immediately adjacent to the campus, and certain non-campus facili- 
ties including Greek housing and remote housing. The statistic must 
be gathered from campus and local police, and college officials that 
have "significant responsibility for student and campus activities" 

Access to Timely Information 

Colleges are also required to provide "timely warnings" and a 
separate but more extensive public crime log. The Bridgewater 
State College Police Department issues "Campus Safety Alert 
Bulletins" whenever a major crime or other significant incident 
may potentially affect the safety or security of the campus com- 
munity. The department also maintains a daily police log that is 
accessible to the public. The police log and any "Campus Safety 
Alert Bulletins" that are issued are also provided for publication 
in the college newspaper, The Comment. 

HAZING 

Hazing is unlawful in Massachusetts. Bridgewater State College 
supports the law. Hazing means "... any conduct or method 
of initiation into any student organization, whether on public 
or private property, which willfully or recklessly endangers the 
physical or mental health of any student or other person." Any 
person who is a principal organizer or participant in the crime of 
hazing shall be punishable by a fine of not more than $3,000 or 
by imprisonment in a house of correction for not more than one 
year, or by both such fine and imprisonment. Please refer to the 
Bndgewater State College Student Handbook for the complete 
college policy statement on hazing. 



College Compliance Policies 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



INAPPROPRIATE BEHAVIORS THAT 
COMPROMISE THE SAFETY AND SECURITY 
OF BRIDGEWATER STATE COLLEGE THAT 
WILL NOT BE TOLERATED 

Student Conduct Code violations, such as those on the follow- 
ing list, may lead to a student suspension or dismissal from 
Bridgewater State College once the determination of responsi- 
bility has been made. Immediate interim suspension pending a 
hearing will occur whenever the accused student is deemed a 
safety threat. Violations include but are not limited to: 

arson 

creating or false reporting of bombs 
illegal drug possession and/or distribution 
illegal occupation of a building 
possession or discharge of illegal weapons 
rape or other sexual assault 
resisting arrest 

destruction of property including electronic property medium 

inciting a riot 

stalking 

driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs 

hate crimes 

hazing 

illegal alcohol distribution 
murder 

physical assault 
threatening 

tampering with fire safety equipment including pulling a false 
fire alarm 

use of a false identification card or providing false identification 
to others 

For information on the college conduct code and judicial 
process, please refer to the Bridgewater State College Student 
Handbook or contact the Office of Student Affairs, Boyden Hall, 
Room 106. 

THE MASSACHUSETTS CLEAN INDOOR ACT 
(MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL LAWS, 
CHAPTER 270, SECT. 22) 

The Massachusetts Clean Indoor Air Act requires that smoking 
be prohibited at colleges within the commonwealth except in 
areas designated by the college as smoking areas. Effective 
Jan. 1 , 1 993, the college became smoke-free. All indoor smoking 
is prohibited. Students and employees interested in participating 
in smoking cessation programs may obtain information from the 
Office of Health Services, Tillinghast Hall, Room 001 ; or the Office 
of Human Resources, Boyden Hall, Room 103. 



DRUG-FREE SCHOOLS AND COMMUNITIES 
ACT AMENDMENTS OF 1989 

In compliance with the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act 
Amendments of 1989, Bridgewater State College has adopted 
and implemented programs to prevent the unlawful possession, 
use or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students 
and employees. 

College policy prohibits the possession, consumption, storage 
or service of alcohol by students and/or their guests, except by 
persons 21 years or age or older who are in transit to (not being 
consumed, stored or served) or at approved or licensed locations, 
such as the Great Hill Student Apartments and within the limits 
of state and local laws and college policy. 

The unlawful possession, use or distribution of illegal drugs 
on college property or at college activities is also prohibited. 
Sanctions are imposed by the college on students and employees 
who violate the college alcohol and drug policy. 

For information on specific college policies pertaining to alco- 
hol and illegal drugs, sanctions for violations of the alcohol and 
drug policy, campus resources and referral agencies, please refer 
to the Bridgewater State College Student Handbook or contact the 
Office of Student Affairs, Boyden Hall, Room 106; the Alcohol/ 
Drug Program, Tillinghast Hall, Room 010; or the Office of Human 
Resources, Boyden Hall, Room 103. 

VOTER REGISTRATION ACT 

(Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 51, Sect. 42E) 
The law requires all colleges to make available voter registration 
forms to all students enrolled in a degree or certificate program 
and physically in attendance at the institution. Massachusetts 
residents will find such forms at the Bridgewater State College 
Web page (www.bridgew.edu - click on BSC Students) and at 
the Campus Center Information Booth. Out-of-state students 
who want to vote in their home state must use either a mail-in 
form supplied by an election official in the home state or the 
federal mail-in affidavit of voter registration. The latter may 
be obtained by writing or calling the Massachusetts Elections 
Division, Room 1705, McCormack Building, OneAshburton 
Place, Boston, MA 02108, 61 7.727.2828 or 1 .800.462.8683; 
through the BSC Web site listed above; or through www.state. 
ma.us/sec/elestu/stuidx.htm. 

STUDENT RIGHT TO KNOW - DISCLOSURE 
OF INSTITUTIONAL GRADUATION RATES 

Bridgewater State College is pleased to provide the following 
information regarding our institution's graduation rates. The 
information is provided in compliance with the Higher Education 
Act of 1965, as amended. 

During the fall semester of 2000, a cohort of 1 , 1 39 first- 
time, full-time, degree-seeking undergraduate students entered 
Bridgewater State College. After six years (as of Aug. 3 1 , 2007), 
48% of these students had graduated from our institution. The 
four-year average graduation rate (for fall 1 998 through fall 
2001 cohorts) is 49%. 

The most updated information regarding the college's graduation 
rates is available at www.bridgew.edu/depts/ir/keyelements.cfm. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



College Compliance Policies 



While reviewing this information, 
please bear in mind: 

The graduation rate is based on students who completed the 
bachelor's program within six years (1 50% of normal time) 

The graduation rate does not include students who trans- 
ferred to other higher education institutions or interrupted 
their course of study (e.g., students on leave, students who left 
school to serve in the armed forces, official church mission, or the 
foreign service of the federal government, or students who are 
deceased or permanently disabled and thus unable to return 
to school) 

For specific questions regarding graduation rates, please con 
tact the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment 

TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAMS AND 
EDUCATOR LICENSURE TEST PASS RATES 

Bndgewater State College offers 18 undergraduate and 
postbaccalaureate programs leading to initial teaching licensure. 
All candidates enrolled in teacher-licensure programs must 
have a major in an arts and sciences discipline in addition to 
their education course sequence, and all candidates are exposed 
to actual K- 1 2 classrooms throughout their teacher preparation 
program Bridgewater's School of Education and Allied Studies 
is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of 
Teacher Elementary and Secondary Education (NCATE). All of 
the college's initial teacher preparation programs are approved 
by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary 
Education, and 13 programs are approved at the national level 
by recognized professional organizations. 



Total number of students enrolled in 
teacher preparation, all specializations, 
in academic year 2006 2007: 

Number of students in supervised student 
teaching in academic year 2006-2007 

Number of faculty members who supervised 
student teachers: 

Full-time faculty in professional education: 
Part-time faculty in professional education 
but full-time in the institution: 

Part-time faculty in professional education, 
not otherwise employed by the institution: 

Total faculty student teaching supervisors: 

Student teacher/faculty ratio: 

The average number of student teaching 
hours per week: 

The total number of weeks of supervised 
student teaching required: 

Average total number of hours required: 



1952 
397 



27 
6 

74 
107 
3.7 

30 

15 

450 



To be licensed to teach in Massachusetts, candidates must pass 
three educator licensure tests: a communication and literacy 
skills battery (reading and writing) and a test in their academic 
content area. The following table reports pass rates for each of 
the tests required for teacher licensure. 



College Compliance Policies 



Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL) 
Annual Institution Report 

Program Year: 2006-2007 



Number of Program Completers: 377 





Institution 


Statewide 




Number 


Number 






Test Field/Category 


Tested 


Passed 


Pass Rate 


Pass Rate 


Basic Skills 


CommLit Reading 


314 


314 


100% 


100% 


CommLit Writing 


315 


315 


100% 


99% 


Aggregate 


317 


317 


100% 


99% 


Academic Content Areas 


fi 1 3 BirJrvnw 

u 1 5 Bioiogy 


7 
/ 






1 fin 

I UU /o 


fi1 ~) rhomictn) 

u i l Lnernisiry 


1 
1 






J*\ /o 


00? Farlv f hilHhnnH 




JU 


1 00% 

1 \J<J /o 


98% 

Z7CJ /O 


014 Earth Science 


2 






100% 


007 English 


28 


28 


100% 


99% 


090 Foundations of Reading 


222 


208 


94% 


98% 


003 General Curriculum 


195 


192 


98% 


99% 


006 History 


15 


15 


100% 


98% 


009 Mathematics 


19 


18 


95% 


97% 


047 Middle School Mathematics 


8 






100% 


016 Music 


3 






100% 


022 Physical Education 


12 


12 


100% 


99% 


048 Political Science/Political Philosophy 


1 






100% 


008 Reading Specialist 


2 






99% 


028 Spanish 


7 






96% 


01 7 Visual Art 


13 


13 


100% 


99% 


Aggregate 


571 


552 


97% 


99% 


Other Content Areas 










021 Health Education 


1 






100% 


Aggregate 


1 






100% 




Summary Totals and Pass Rate 


357 


339 


95% 


98% 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog 



bSc 



UK I I X.I « M ! K 
S I M I ( c >l I I (.1 



Academic Programs 



UNDERGRADUATE 
MAJORS 

Thirty-one undergraduate majors are 
currently offered. For more detailed 
information, see requirements listed in the 
appropriate department of this catalog. 

Students should be aware that not 
all courses are offered in the evening. 
Students who are only able to enroll in 
classes 4 pm or after should consult the 
appropriate department chairperson for 
information about the availability of eve- 
ning sections of courses required in a spe- 
cific major, concentration and/or minor. 

Accounting and Finance 

Concentrations: 

Accounting 

Finance 

Anthropology 

Concentrations: 
Cultural Anthropology 
General Anthropology 
Public Archaeology 

Art 

Concentrations: 
Art Education 
Art History 
Crafts 
Fine Arts 
Graphic Design 
Photography 

Athletic Training 

Aviation Science 

Concentrations: 
Aviation Management 
Flight Training 

Biology 

Concentrations. 

Biomedical/Molecular Biology 
Environmental Biology 
General Biology 



Business-see Management and 
Accounting and Finance 

Chemistry 

Concenfraf/ons. 
Biochemistry 
Environmental Chemistry 
Professional Chemistry 

Chemistry-Geology 

Communication Studies 

Concenfraf/ons. 
Corporate Communication 
Individualized 

Media Studies and Communication 

Technologies 
Speech Communication 
Dance Education 
Theater Arts 
Theater Education 

Computer Science 
Criminal Justice 

Early Childhood Education 

Concentration: 

Early Education and Care (PreK-K) 

Earth Sciences 

Concentrations: 
General 

Environmental Geosciences 
Geology 

Economics 

Elementary Education 

English 

Concentrations: 

English Education (High School, 

Middle School) 
Writing 

Geography 

Health Education 

Concentrations: 
Community Health 
School Health 

History 

Concenfraf/on. 
Military History 



Management 

Concentrations: 

General Management 

Energy and Environmental Resources 

Management 
Global Management 
Information Systems Management 
Marketing 

Operations Management 
Transportation 

Mathematics 
Music 

Concentration: 
Music Education 

Philosophy 

Concentration: 
Applied Ethics 

Physical Education 

Concentrations: 
Coaching 

Exercise Science/Health Fitness 
Motor Development Therapy/Adapted 

Physical Education 
Recreation 

Recreation and Fitness Club 

Administration 
Teacher Licensure available in: 

Physical Education (PreK-8) 

Physical Education (5-12) 

Physics 

Concentrations: 
General Physics 
Professional Physics 

Political Science 

Concentrations: 
American Politics 
International Affairs 
Legal Studies 
Public Administration 



Academic Programs 



Psychology 

Concentrations: 
Child Psychology 

Industrial and Organizational Psychology 
Medical and Health Psychology 

Social Work 

Sociology 

Concentrations: 

City, Community and Region 

Education 

Global Studies 

Spanish 

Special Education 

Concentration: 
Communication Disorders 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

For complete information about graduate 
degrees and concentrations, and post- 
baccalaureate programs, see the "School 
of Graduate Studies" section of this catalog 
or visit www.bridgew.edu/sogs/. 

Master of Arts (MA) 

English 

Concentration: 

Creative Writing 
Psychology 

Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) 

Biology 
Creative Arts 
English 
History 
Mathematics 
Music Education 
Physical Science 
Physics 

Master of Education (MEd) 

Counseling 

Concentrations: 

Mental Health Counseling 

Mental Health Counseling - Dual 
License 

School Counseling 

Student Affairs Counseling 
Early Childhood Education 
Educational Leadership 



Elementary Education 
Health Promotion 
Instructional Technology 
PreK-12 Education (For Educators in 

non-U. S. settings) 
Reading 

Special Education 
Concentrations: 
Moderate Disabilities 
Severe Disabilities 

Master of Public Administration 
(MPA) 

Concentrations: 

Civil and Nonprofit Leadership and 

Administration 
Sustainable Community Development 

Master of Science (MS) 

Athletic Training 
Computer Science 
Criminal Justice 

Concentrations: 

Administration of Justice 

Crime and Corrections 
Physical Education 

Concentrations: 

Adapted Physical Education 

Applied Kinesiology 

Human Performance and Health 
Fitness 

Strength and Conditioning 

Master of Science in Management 
(MS) 

Concentrations: 

Accounting 

Marketing 

Organization Development 
Technology Management 

Master of Social Work (MSW) 

Certificate of Advanced Graduate 
Study (CAGS) 

Educational Leadership 
Mental Health Counseling 
Reading 

School Counseling 



Doctor of Education (EdD) 

(Collaborative program with the University 

of Massachusetts - Lowell) 
Educational Leadership 
Reading 

Postbaccalaureate Licensure 
Programs 

Early Childhood Education 
Educational Leadership 
Elementary Education 
Health (Health, Family and 

Consumer Sciences) 
Instructional Technology 
Physical Education 
Secondary Education 

(Middle School/High 

School/PreK-1 2 Specialist) 
Special Education 

Postmaster's Licensure Programs 

Educational Leadership 
School Counseling 

Postbaccalaureate Licensure 
Programs 

Early Childhood Education 
Educational Leadership 
Elementary Education 
Health (Health, Family and Consumer 
Sciences) 

Physical Education (Middle School/High 

School/PreK-12 Specialist) 
Special Education 

Postmaster's Licensure Programs 

Educational Leadership 
School Counseling 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at wvwv.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



The Educational Environment 



HHIIK.I *M I H 
STATE COLLEGE 



A diverse array of academic programs, close association with 
a superb faculty, extensive online and technological resources, 
opportunities to learn and grow outside of the classroom, and a 
supportive network of advisers and counselors are the 
key elements of the academic environment at Bndgewater 
State College. 

A wide variety of service learning, study abroad, cultural and 
social activities complement the learning process and add rich 
dimensions to the total academic experience. 

The college is committed to fostering student success Faculty 
and staff strive to help each student work to achieve her or his 
full potential The college's long tradition of academic excellence 
is built upon a foundation of challenging studies, an intellectually 
stimulating atmosphere, and a tradition of community service 
and partnership 

Rapid advances in technology have created new opportuni- 
ties for learning and require new skills in the ability to assimilate 
complex ideas. 



THE FACULTY 

Bridgewater State College has an outstanding faculty of women 
and men who are dedicated to teaching as a career, not just a 
vocation. Bridgewater State College professors are nationally 
recognized for their expertise in their fields of study. Ninety per- 
cent hold terminal degrees in their fields and many faculty mem 
bers serve as consultants and advisers to corporations, nonprofit 
organizations, school systems and government agencies Other 
faculty provide leadership to professional societies and conduct 
pioneering research in their respective fields. Students may work 
closely with faculty through a variety of means including intern- 
ships, research or the Honors Program. 



CLEMENT C. MAXWELL LIBRARY 

Conveniently located on West Campus , Maxwell Library is a hub 
of activity. Not only does the library house a number of academic 
and administrative departments, faculty offices and classrooms, 
it also provides a variety of information resources and electronic 
tools for student and faculty use in a comfortable and inviting 
environment. Open more than 90 hours each week, the library is 
staffed by highly qualified professionals and support personnel 
skilled at satisfying reference and research needs. 

The library's core collection of print and electronic materials 
is complemented by a substantial collection of videos, DVDs 
and CDs Students and faculty can discover the wealth of books, 
newspapers, periodicals, sound recordings and movie titles using 
the library's online public access catalog, Webster With approxi- 
mately 300,000 volumes, more than 3 1 ,000 periodical subscrip- 
tions and nearly 100 electronic bibliographic and full-text article 
databases, the library provides students and faculty with access 
to a breadth of information sources supporting their classroom 
and research needs. The library is dedicated to providing resourc- 
es in all subject disciplines taught by the college's faculty. 

Because the library has both hard-wired and wireless net- 
works, students can work anywhere in the building using their 



notebook computers They can also use the desktop computers 
to search the catalog and Web site, www bndgew.edu/library. 
Since most of these computers include a suite of applications 
such as Microsoft Word and Excel, students can find information 
resources and complete their course assignments at the same 
time. The library is a dynamic learning place 



DEPARTMENTAL RESOURCES 

The college offers extensive computer facilities for instruc- 
tional purposes and resources that range from a Zeiss Electron 
Microscope in the Department of Biological Sciences and an 
astronomy observatory in the Department of Physics to a writing 
studio offered by the Department of English. 

Facilities for weaving, ceramics, sculpture and painting are 
available in the Department of Art. A flight simulator is provided 
m the Department of Aviation Science These and many other 
resources support the educational mission of the college and 
ensure that Bridgewater State College students can learn and 
apply contemporary knowledge and skills 

Additional resources may be found in each academic 
department section of this catalog. 



DISABILITY RESOURCES 

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 
and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1 973, Bridgewater 
State College is committed to making its facilities, services and 
programs accessible to all students. The Office of Disability 
Resources offers support and assistance to students with disabili- 
ties who are enrolled in the college. 

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to identify with 
the Office of Disability Resources and provide appropriate docu- 
mentation that is evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Services and 
academic accommodations may include, but are not limited to, 
adaptive technology, testing accommodations, alternate format 
materials, interpreter services, priority registration, peer mentor- 
ing and leadership advocacy. 

Students must request services in a timely manner by contact- 
ing the Office of Disability Resources, located in the Academic 
Achievement Center in the Clement C. Maxwell Library, or call 
508. 53 1 . 1 2 1 4 or 508. 53 1 .6 1 1 3 TTY. Further information on 
Disability Resources services, programs and policies may be 
found on the Web page at 
www.bridgew.edu/aacydisability_resources.cfm 



THE ONLINE WORLD AND TECHNOLOGY 

Blackboard and InfoBear 

Many of the courses at Bridgewater State College are enhanced 
by course Web sites developed through the Blackboard learning 
portal. Using their personal Blackboard account, students enroll 
in their course Web sites; gain access to course syllabi, materi- 
als and other information posted by the professors; engage in 
online discussions; collaborate with fellow students; view grades 
on assignments and tests in a course; and sometimes even take 
quizzes or prepare for exams in the online environment 



s 



BSC 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



The Educational Environment 



InfoBear is a Web-based service provided by Bridgewater 
State College to allow quick and convenient access to each 
student's course enrollment, transcripts showing progress toward 
graduation, course grades and other information. Students also 
register for courses through InfoBear, which is available through 
the college Web site and requires a student identification number 
and personal identification number. 

Web-Based Courses 

Learning in our society is no longer limited to the classroom, 
and it is important for lifelong learning for students to be able 
to learn from a variety of information sources. Bridgewater State 
College students have the opportunity to take courses delivered 
by a range of technologies. In addition to the many courses that 
use Blackboard to enhance the learning experience, the college also 
offers Web-based courses that are offered primarily over the Internet 
Requirements include access to a notebook or desktop computer with 
printer and Internet connection, Web browsing capability and e-mail. 
Instructors determine the mix of technologies that are employed in 
their courses. For most Web-based courses, a certain number of class 
meetings on campus may still be required. 

Wireless Network 

Bridgewater State College has provided wireless network con- 
nectivity across the entire campus since fall 2001 . Staff, faculty, 
students and visitors with wireless-enabled notebook computers 
are able to connect to the network from anywhere on campus, 
including classrooms, labs, offices, lounges, the library and out- 
doors. This enables users to access the Internet, read e-mail and 
connect to all of the college's online resources at any time. Due 
to wireless access points being placed throughout the college 
campus, students can walk from one side of the campus to the 
other while remaining connected to the network. 

John Joseph Moakley Center for 
Technological Applications 

The Moakley Center has been supporting the technology needs 
of Bridgewater State College students as well as the region's 
educators and businesses since its opening in 1 995. The Moakley 
Center is a technology-integrated, 50,000-square-foot learning 
venue that focuses the power of technology on its guiding prin- 
ciple that education is a lifelong process. 

A 2 1 3-seat amphitheater features a full complement of the 
latest multimedia presentation technologies. Its television/video 
production facility grants access to digital editing and complete 
teleconference capabilities for students, businesses and educa- 
tors. Several multimedia training rooms offer the latest in tech- 
nology-enhanced learning. 

A variety of technology-based resources and programs 
is housed in the Moakley Center. These include the RiverNet 
Watershed Access Lab, CityLab, the Teaching and Technology 
Support Center, a digital music classroom, the Center for 
the Advancement of Research and Teaching (CART) and the 
GeoGraphics Laboratory. 



INTERNATIONAL STUDY TOURS 

Short-term, faculty-led study tours to international locations are 
offered for undergraduate or graduate college credit. Each course 
is designed by a Bridgewater State College faculty member 
according to his/her regional and academic expertise, providing 
an opportunity for students to explore, firsthand, societies quite 
different from their own. These courses, which vary in length from 
10 days to five weeks, are offered during winter intersession, 
spring break and summer. Study tour destinations have included 
Japan, Peru, Cuba and Ireland. The Bridgewater-at-Oxford pro- 
gram offers three weeks of summer study at Oxford University 
in England with a choice of political science/law, art history, 
English literature or English history. Students from all majors and 
academic classes are encouraged to participate. For more infor- 
mation contact the Office of International Programs, Maxwell 
Library, 508.53 1.6183 or visit www.bridgew.edu/international/. 

CROSS REGISTRATION PROGRAMS 

CAPS 

College Academic Program Sharing (CAPS) is designed to provide 
full-time students attending a Massachusetts state college the 
opportunity to study at another state college to add a different or 
specialized dimension to their undergraduate studies. Students 
may participate for one or two semesters and complete up to 30 
semester hours of credit without going through formal admis- 
sions or registration procedures. Tuition is covered within the 
student's full-time tuition charge at Bridgewater State College. 
Courses taken under the CAPS program are not included in the 
student's GPA. All BSC students who wish to cross-register as 
part of the CAPS program must apply through the Registrar's 
Office, Boyden Hall. Students from another college who wish to 
take courses at BSC through CAPS must work with the Registrar's 
Office at their home institution. 

SACHEM 

Through the Southeastern Association for Cooperation of Higher 
Education (SACHEM) program, qualified full-time students may 
cross-register for up to two courses each semester without 
going through formal registration procedures. Tuition is covered 
within the student's full-time tuition charge at Bridgewater State 
College. Courses taken under the SACHEM 'program are not 
included in the student's GPA. Schools participating in this pro- 
gram include Bristol Community College, Cape Cod Community 
College, Dean College, Massachusetts Maritime Academy, 
Massasoit Community College, Stonehill College, University of 
Massachusetts at Dartmouth andWheaton College. All BSC stu- 
dents who wish to cross-register as part of the SACHEM program 
must apply through the Registrar's Office, Boyden Hall. Students 
from another college who wish to take courses at BSC through 
SACHEM must work with the Registrar's Office at their 
home institution. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addendd/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



The Undergraduate 
Academic Experience 



LEARNING RESOURCES 

Bndgewater State College's undergraduate program provides 
fundamental knowledge in different areas of study as well as 
specialized, m-depth knowledge and skills in a major area. Each 
student acquires the knowledge and skills to communicate 
effectively, think logically, work quantitatively, and evaluate and 
assimilate information from a variety of sources. These skills are 
critically important to a life of learning and personal and 
professional growth. 

The core of the Bridgewater State College academic experi- 
ence is the study of liberal arts. Every student, regardless of 
major, completes the core curriculum - a general course of study 
that provides a foundation for studies in each major. Distribution 
requirements include fine and performing arts, humanities, 
natural sciences and social/behavioral sciences. Most of the core 
curriculum is completed during the first two years of college, 
with the last two years focused on the major field of study. 

Emphasis is placed on reading, writing and oral communica- 
tion skills. Business executives rank proficiency in communica- 
tion as the most important skill an employee can possess. The 
ability to collect and integrate information, organize one's ideas, 
express these ideas logically and clearly, and respond to the ideas 
of others is rooted in language skills. 

The college has a rich and varied array of majors, minors and 
program options. For the undergraduate student, there is a 
broad spectrum of more than 100 such possibilities. 



THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT CENTER 

The Academic Achievement Center houses a variety of programs 
and services that support the adjustment to college and the aca- 
demic success of students. The Academic Achievement Center is 
located on the ground floor of the Maxwell Library and includes 
the following programs: 

The Haughey Academic Advising Program 

The advising program serves freshmen and all other students 
who have yet to declare an academic major. Freshmen are 
introduced to the advising program during orientation and par- 
ticipate in a number of group and individual advising sessions 
throughout the academic year. The focus of the advising program 
is on helping each student plan a program of study and make a 
successful and happy transition to college life. 

Enrichment Program 

A variety of services is available to help strengthen those 
skills most essential to effective learning both in college and 
throughout life. 

The program is based on the college's commitment to provide 
students with every opportunity to build upon strengths they 
have while correcting any deficiencies. This assistance is 
provided through specialized courses in English and mathematics 
and through resources such as Studying and Research Services, 
the Writing Studio, Mathematics Services, Communication 
Laboratory, Second Language Services and Disability Resources. 
Tutorial assistance is also provided. 



Students needing assistance may be referred by faculty or 
staff. A student may also request special help, which the college 
may provide 

Learning Assistance Services 

Students may receive assistance through the following services 
offered in the Academic Achievement Center: 

Communication Lab - Students are assisted with prepara- 
tion of oral presentations through services that teach strate- 
gies for topic selection, outline development and research, as 
well as through opportunities for presentation practice. 

Mathematics Services - Students participate in individual 
or small-group tutoring and have access to a variety of video 
and computer materials to support mastery of mathematics 
concepts and skills. 

Studying and Research Services - Students are helped 
to develop strategies for managing the demands of college 
courses and skills for completing demanding course 
assignments. 

Writing Studio -- Students are provided individualized assis- 
tance to strengthen skills at all stages of the writing process. 



INTRODUCTORY COLLEGE SKILLS 

Courses - Students may be assigned to a class or to 
Introductory College Skills courses as a result of a review of the 
students' high school records, SAT scores and performance on 
various placement examinations generally given during Freshman 
Orientation. A student may also request this assistance, which 
the college is pleased to provide. 

The course or courses will be graded on a (S) satisfactory/ (U) 
unsatisfactory basis and will not be calculated in the student's 
cumulative quality point average. Students assigned to any of 
these courses must complete the course successfully before 
attempting any other course in that area. (The credit earned in 
any Introductory College Skills course may not be used to satisfy 
Core Curriculum Requirements nor may it be applied toward the 
minimum number of credits required for graduation in 
any major.) 

FRSK 100 Introductory College Skills: Intrusive 
Advising - A specialized learning/advising program for fresh- 
men offered by the Academic Achievement Center and 
conducted in a small group setting. Students who wish further 
information about this course should contact the Academic 
Achievement Center. 

FRSK 101 Introductory College Skills: Writing -The 
course will consist of an intensive review of basic communica- 
tion skills, chiefly those of reading and writing. Students who 
wish further information about this course should consult with 
the chairperson of the Department of English or the Academic 
Achievement Center. 

FRSK 102 Introductory College Skills: Mathematics 

- Fundamental principles of algebra and geometry, S r udents 
who wish further information about this course should consult 
with the chairperson of the Department of Mathematics and 
Computer Science, or the Mathematics Laboratory director, or the 
director of the Academic Achievement Center. 



14 



The Undergraduate 
Academic Experience 



CONTINUING AND DISTANCE EDUCATION 

The Office of Continuing and Distance Education works closely 
with the academic schools to provide credit courses offered after 
4 pm, off campus or on weekends, during intersession and during 
the summer. The office is responsible for all undergraduate and 
graduate courses offered via distance learning. Continuing and 
Distance Education also provides noncredit online courses and 
certificate programs. 

Continuing and Distance Education offers students an 
opportunity to complete a degree started years ago, take 
courses around a busy work and family schedule, further their 
knowledge, gain professional experience or learn something 
new for personal enjoyment. For more information, contact the 
Continuing and Distance Education Office at 508.531.2788 or 
visit the Web site at www.bridgew.edu/cde. 

TECHNOLOGICAL RESOURCES 

Bridgewater State College strives to remain in the forefront of 
educational technology. A wireless network across campus, an 
array of technology-enhanced courses, classroom and labora- 
tories that integrate technology, a robust residence network 
service, and a program for student notebook computers com- 
bine to give Bridgewater State College students an advantage 
in our technologically based society. See "The Educational 
Environment" section of this catalog for additional details. 

THE COMPUTER NOTEBOOK PROGRAM 

The college's computer notebook program, initiated in fall 2004, 
builds upon the college's strengths in technology to engage all 
students at Bridgewater State College in a technology-rich edu- 
cational experience and to help students develop skills that will 
be invaluable before and after graduation. Students can access 
the Internet using the college's wireless network, find and view 
course information and communicate with their classmates, and 
stay connected at home to keep up on e-mail and homework. 

Beginning with freshmen entering in the Fall of 2004 and 
applying to all subsequent entering classes, the college requires 
new full-time undergraduate students to own a notebook 
computer. This policy also applies to full-time transfer students 
whose accumulated credits place them in a graduating class for 
which notebooks are required. Students may purchase a com- 
puter on their own that meets the minimum specifications or may 
purchase their notebook through the college's agreement with 
a selected vendor offering competitive prices and the standard 
suite of office software. More information about the notebook 
program can be found at http://notebooks.bridgew.edu/. 

RESIDENCE NETWORK 

The residence network (ResNet) service provides all resident 
students with high-speed Internet access, reduced long distance 
telephone charges, voice mail, and cable TV, which includes HBO, 
NESN and movie channels that air on Residence Life Cinema. 
Every month, 16 recently released feature films are available 
for viewing. 



The ResNet program is handled by one payment each semes- 
ter, which provides for all support needed to ensure the availabil- 
ity of these services. Further information on the ResNet program 
can be found at http://resnet.bridgew.edu/. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR LEARNING 
BEYOND THE CLASSROOM 



THE HONORS PROGRAM 

The Honors Program at Bridgewater State College encourages 
gifted and highly motivated students to reach their highest 
potential through critical thinking, scholarship and research. 
Small classes and close student-faculty relations provide for the 
vigorous and thorough exchange of ideas, while the program as 
a whole works to create an atmosphere fostering intellectual, 
artistic and academic achievement. 

The program does not require students to complete additional 
course work beyond the credit hours necessary for graduation; 
instead, students earn honors credits by taking honors sections 
of regular courses and/or honors colloquia during their fresh- 
man and sophomore years, and by undertaking individualized 
research programs with faculty mentors during their junior and 
senior years. For information on funds available to support stu- 
dent research, see "The Office of Undergraduate Research and 
the Adrian Tinsley Program for Undergraduate Research" below. 

Honors students meet with the director or assistant director 
once a semester to discuss their work in the program. For all 
honors work completed with a grade of B (3.0) or higher, stu- 
dents receive honors credit on their transcripts, and those who 
complete the program receive an honors degree - a goal worth 
serious effort both for the intrinsic satisfaction it brings and the 
advantages it provides at a time of strong competition for gradu- 
ate and career opportunities. 

Commonwealth and Departmental Honors 

Students can participate in the Honors Program in two ways: 
by undertaking all of the requirements listed for Commonwealth 
Honors or by undertaking the requirements listed only 
under Junior and Senior Years for Departmental Honors. 
Commonwealth Honors thus runs throughout a student's under- 
graduate career, whereas Departmental Honors takes place only 
in the student's last two years. Commonwealth Honors includes 
the requirements for Departmental Honors; a student might 
undertake only Departmental Honors if he or she transferred to 
Bridgewater State College or developed an interest in pursuing 
honors work after the freshman year. 

A complete description of the opportunities and requirements 
for the Honors Program is available at www.bridgew.edu/honors 
program/ or the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



15 



The Undergraduate 
Academic Experience 



THE OFFICE OF UNDERGRADUATE 
RESEARCH AND THE ADRIAN TINSLEY 
PROGRAM FOR UNDERGRADUATE 
RESEARCH 

The Adrian Tinsley Program for Undergraduate Research 
(www.bndgew edu/atp/), with the support of the Office of 
Undergraduate Research, provides opportunities to Bridgewater 
State College undergraduates who wish to pursue research, 
scholarship or artistic work under the guidance of a full-time 
faculty or librarian mentor. Through ATP, students design and 
develop research projects, learn new research skills, gain a more 
sophisticated understanding of the nature of academic research, 
and have opportunities to present their research and creative 
work at regional and national conferences The outcome of the 
program is for students to graduate with the self confidence, 
motivation and ability to conduct independent scholarship 
and research. 

The Tinsley Program supports a variety of undergraduate proj- 
ects, conducted over the course of a semester, summer or longer, 
involving research or other forms of scholarship or artistic work 
in all disciplines. The project may include laboratory research in 
the physical and life sciences; research in education, mathematics 
and business; scholarship in the humanities and social sciences, 
and stage performances, displays or research in the visual arts 
and design. 

The Tinsley Program provides year-round support of under- 
graduate research through a variety of competitive opportunities: 

Summer Grants are awarded to students for work done over 
10 weeks of the summer on an in-depth, research project con- 
ducted under the supervision of a BSC faculty or librarian mentor. 
The grant includes a stipend awarded to the student, who may 
also apply for additional money for research expenses, and a 
stipend for the faculty or librarian mentor. 

Semester Grants are awarded each semester to offset the 
costs of research-related supplies and travel. 

Travel Grants support students who present their research 
at regional or national conferences, and fund travel, lodging, 
registration and related fees. 

The National Conference on Undergraduate Research. 

Bridgewater State College traditionally sends a number of 
students to the National Conference on Undergraduate 
Research (NCUR), which is held in different cities each year. 
Students may use their travel grants to attend the conference 
and present their work. 

The Undergraduate Research Symposium takes place in 
April each year in the Moakley Center and showcases under- 
graduate research through oral and poster presentations 
and displays. Faculty, staff, students, administration and guests 
are welcome. 

The Undergraduate Review: A Journal of Research and 
Creative Work publishes undergraduate research 
annually. For more information and submission guidelines, 
see www.bndgew edu/atp/ur htm. 

Midyear Symposium for First and Second Year 
Students takes place on the last day of the fall semester each 



year and showcases first experiences in research by individu 
als and groups at the college. Faculty, staff, administration and 
guests are welcome 

The Graduate Application Reimbursement Program 

reimburses students who have previously received an ATP sum 
mer or semester grant for up to S250 worth of fees for applica- 
tions to graduate schools. 

Additionally, The Office of Undergraduate Research features 
outside sources of funding for undergraduate research, oppor- 
tunities to present regionally and nationally, and to publish 
reasearch and creative work by undergraduates in national 
undergraduate journals Students interested in these or the 
Tinsley Program can contact the office at 508.53 1 .2436 or by 
visiting the OUR Web site at www.bridgew.edu/our. 



THE BRIDGE: A STUDENT JOURNAL OF 
FINE ARTS 

The Bridge is a journal of fiction, nonaction, poetry, drama and 
visual art created and published by undergraduate students 
and alumni. Once each year, students and alumni are invited to 
submit their creative works which are competitively selected by a 
student editorial board For more information, contact The Bridge 
at thebridgejournal@bndgew.edu, or at 508.53 1 .2983. 



INTERNSHIPS 

Internships consist of both on- and off-campus work experi- 
ence with a site supervisor/employer for academic credit under 
the guidance of a faculty member or noncredit through the 
Internship Office. Internships allow students to gain career- 
related experience while in college, an important factor in finding 
the first professional position. Students interested in internships 
should first check with their academic department if they wish to 
receive credit. Credited internships are usually tied to a student's 
academic major. Students need to have completed a specific 
number of credit hours and go through a formal approval process 
before credit can be awarded. To determine possible internship 
sites, students should check with their academic department as 
well as the Office of Career Services' Internship Program, which 
maintains a database of internship opportunities in the region. 
Some students who choose to do an internship but do not need 
credit may want to meet with the career services internship coor 
dinator to help locate opportunities, prepare for the internship 
interview, develop a cover letter and resume and learn important 
tips for getting the most from the experience. These services 
are offered to any student looking for an internship whether or 
not it is for credit. For further information, see the "Academic 
Programs" section of this catalog. 



COMMUNITY SERVICE AND SERVICE- 
LEARNING 

Bridgewater State College believes firmly in the relevance 
and importance of experiential learning in all of its academic 
programs. Service- learning is a teaching method that uses com- 
munity service to help students gain a deeper understanding of 
course objectives, acquire new knowledge and engage in civic 



16 



The Undergraduate 
Academic Experience 



activity. A number of faculty incorporate service-learning into 
their courses. The college has established a center for Community 
Service and Service-Learning in the Campus Center to develop 
community contacts and collect and disseminate information on 
service-learning and volunteer opportunities. 

In addition, various student leadership programs at 
Bridgewater State College include community service compo- 
nents. Projects include Habitat for Humanity, Jumpstart, Earth 
Day projects, domestic and international alternative spring break 
programs, Old Colony Big Sister Big Brother, programs that focus 
on homelessness and poverty, Meals on Wheels and many more. 

CHILDREN'S PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENTAL 
CLINIC 

For more than 35 years, Bridgewater State College has sponsored 
the Children's Physical Developmental Clinic (CPDC), a nationally 
recognized academic program that fosters professional develop- 
ment, community service and leadership qualities. The CPDC 
affords students from all majors a challenging opportunity for 
volunteering as clinicians to work with children and youth with 
disabilities between the ages of 1 8 months to 1 8 years. 

The aim of the clinic program is to improve the "total develop- 
ment" of children with disabilities by enhancing vital physical, 
motor and aquatic skills and patterns. In addition, the program 
stresses the improvement of self-esteem of children by strength- 
ening emotional-social aspects of their personalities through suc- 
cessful involvement in play, recreation and sport activities. 

Over a hundred students serve as clinicians and support staff 
each semester, making the CPDC the largest student organiza- 
tion on campus. Over the years, BSC students have determined 
that the CPDC not only augments their professional preparation; 
but, upon graduation, is most critical to them when seeking 
employment and entrance to graduate school. 

EXCHANGE AND INTERNATIONAL 
PROGRAMS 

Bridgewater State College students can study at many universi- 
ties in the world, including those in countries such as Brazil, 
Spain, France and Portugal. Bridgewater State College has 
exchange programs in Brazil, Canada, England, Ireland, Japan 
and Jordan. Students have the opportunity to study in Canada 
at more than a dozen institutions, including McGill University. 
Scholarships are available, and financial aid may be used for all 
travel programs. 

Through the National Student Exchange, students may spend 
up to one year attending a college or university in another state 
at the in-state tuition rate. The National Student Exchange direc- 
tory describes more than 175 institutions involved in this pro- 
gram. For further information contact the Office of International 
Programs, www.bridgew.edu/international. 



CAMPUS LIFE 



GETTING STARTED: ORIENTATION FOR 
NEW STUDENTS 

Bridgewater State College's orientation program has been 
designed to introduce new students and their families to the 
campus community. Through collaborative efforts between the 
divisions of Academic Affairs and Student Affairs, orientation 
provides programs that are conducive to the academic and devel- 
opmental success of new students. The goals of orientation are 
to develop and coordinate programs that promote academic suc- 
cess, to enhance personal and social development, and to pro- 
vide families and their students with information about services, 
support systems and issues facing college students. 

Orientation is divided into two different programs. The initial 
program in June is a comprehensive two-day, overnight intro- 
duction to the college with an emphasis on placement testing, 
academic advising and registration for fall classes. Students also 
have an opportunity to meet with faculty and staff and learn 
about the resources available at the college. A one-day concur- 
rent family program provides parents with information about 
services, support systems and resources for their students. 

The second program is prior to the opening of classes in the 
fall when students are given the opportunity to meet new friends, 
learn the traditions of Bridgewater State College and receive 
assistance with transition to college life. 

COLLEGE EVENTS AND SPECIAL 
PROGRAMS 

Literally hundreds of interesting programs, projects and events 
are available at Bridgewater State College throughout each 
year. Academic, cultural and social activities and programs are 
sponsored each year by students, faculty, staff and alumni of the 
college and include, but are certainly not limited to Homecoming, 
Parents Day, Convocation, the Massachusetts Hall of Black 
Achievement at Bridgewater State College, Dr. Martin Luther 
King Jr. Day Celebration and Breakfast, Awards for Excellence, 
Springfest and the Holiday Concert. 

Consult the Bridgewater State College Web site, the numer- 
ous bulletin boards across the campus, as well as college publica- 
tions, for information on campus events as they arise. 

CULTURAL, SOCIAL, ATHLETIC AND 
RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES 

In addition to classroom instruction, Bridgewater State College 
offers students a full social, cultural, athletic, recreational and 
religious life. Art exhibits, lectures, concerts, movies, plays, work- 
shops and sports events make for an active campus schedule. 
(Please refer to the college Web site www.bridgew.edu for a 
complete listing of clubs, organizations and a calendar of 
campus events.) 

Through programs sponsored by the Office of Student 
Involvement and Leadership, the Student Government 
Association, the Program Committee and other organizations, 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



17 



The Undergraduate 
Academic Experience 



BSC 



STATE COLLEGE 



members of the college community have opportunities to attend 
events featuring significant public figures and internationally 
acclaimed performing artists. 

The Art Building and Maxwell Library feature galleries where 
exhibits are displayed and the Rondileau Campus Center offers 
special programs such as performances by the college Chorale 
Society and the Bndgewater State College Dance Company. For 
students who enjoy the theater, Bndgewater State College has 
much to offer. Major productions are presented by students in 
the Department of Theater and Dance throughout the year. 

Bndgewater State College has a strong athletic tradition 
which has grown to include 2 1 intercollegiate varsity sports 
teams, a full range of intramural athletic programs and a number 
of club sports programs. The Adrian Tinsley Center features a 
state-of-the-art fitness center, a walking track and multi-sport 
surfaces. The college is a member of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association (NCAA) Division III, the Eastern Collegiate 
Athletic Conference (ECAC) and the Massachusetts State College 
Athletic Conference (MASCAC). 

Community members keep abreast of events and programs 
through a variety of campus media. The student newspaper, The 
Comment, and the college's home page focus on news and fea- 
ture stones highlighting campus life and individual achievements. 

The campus radio station, WBIM-FM, provides coverage of 
events plus a full range of musical and special interest program- 
ming. Resident students have access to a cable television local 
access channel offering college news and information. The Office 
of Institutional Communications maintains a Campus Events Line 
508.53 1 . 1 768, a weekly recording of campus events. 

RELIGIOUS LIFE 

The college supports student pursuit of spirituality both individu- 
ally and in groups. The college provides groups of students the 
opportunity to form student organizations so they may utilize col- 
lege facilities for meetings and events as well as request funding 
from the Student Government Association. The Catholic Center 
(122 Park Avenue) and the Christian Fellowship Center (29 Shaw 
Road) are independent entities that offer students both group 
and individual opportunities for worship and service. 



SERVICES TO STUDENTS 

Students face many decisions involving housing, finances, health, 
work, academic programs, post-undergraduate study and career 
goals. The Office of Student Affairs provides assistance in making 
these decisions through personal and career counseling, off- and 
on-campus housing information, health services, child care cen- 
ter, social activities and student advocacy. The Bndgewater State 
College Student Handbook provides detailed information about 
these services. It is available at www.bridgew.edu/handbook/. 

CHILDREN'S CENTER 

The Children's Center provides high-quality care and education 
to preschool-aged children. Open from the beginning of the fall 
semester in September through the end of Summer Session II 
in August, the center offers nine different enrollment options 
ranging from two half days to five full days. This model program, 
accredited by the National Association for the Education of 
Young Children, is also available for observation, fieldwork and 
data collection. The Children's Center is located in the Burnell 
Campus School, Room 135. For additional information contact 
the Children's Center at 508.53 1 . 1 244, www.bridgew.edu/child- 
renscenter/ or by e-mail at childrencenter@bndgew.edu. 



18 



Undergraduate Admission 



For information about admission to graduate programs, please 
consult the "School of Graduate Studies" section of this catalog. 

Bridgewater State College seeks to admit students who give 
evidence of intellectual capacity, motivation, character and who 
have a record of scholastic achievement. An effort is made to 
attract candidates of diverse academic, economic, racial, religious 
and geographic backgrounds. The admission requirements and 
procedures are designed to assist the college to select a fresh- 
man class from those applicants who can benefit from the educa- 
tional opportunities at Bridgewater State College. 

Bridgewater State College does not discriminate on the basis 
of race, color, creed, religion, national origin, gender, age, dis- 
ability, sexual orientation, gender identity, genetic information, 
marital status, political belief or affiliation, or veteran status. 

FRESHMAN ADMISSION 
REQUIREMENTS 

APPLICATION FORM 

Each candidate should submit the Bridgewater State College 
application. The form, aside from collecting biographical data, 
allows the candidate to provide additional information concern- 
ing their academic and extracurricular interests. The college 
prefers students to apply online at the college's Web site, www. 
bridgew.edu, but also accepts the Common Application as well as 
other electronically formatted applications. 

HIGH SCHOOL RECORD 

Candidates must request an official transcript of their second- 
ary school record be sent directly to the Office of Admission. The 
strength of the applicant's curriculum, grades, weighted grade 
point average and class rank as well as the level of competition 
in the applicant's high school are taken into consideration. 

The secondary program should include the following college 
preparatory subjects: 

English (a) 4 units 

Mathematics (b) 3 units 

Science (c) 3 units 

History/Social Science (d) 2 units 

Foreign Language (e) 2 units 

Elective Units (f) 2 units 

Related Courses (g) 4 units 

a. English must be college preparatory courses in composition 
and literature, which include the development of reading, 
writing and comprehension skills. 

b. Mathematics must be college preparatory courses in such 
subjects as algebra, geometry, trigonometry, elementary func- 
tions and mathematical analysis. A fourth year of mathematics 
is strongly recommended for students who plan to enter fields 
such as computer science, management science, mathematics, 
pre-engineering or the sciences. 

c. Two of the science courses must include laboratory work. 

d. This requirement should include one year of United States 
history and government. 



e. Students are encouraged to elect additional years of foreign 
language study. 

f. Students should choose from additional college preparatory 
courses in English, mathematics, computer science, foreign 
language, natural and physical science, visual and performing 
arts and humanities. 

g. Students are encouraged to elect courses that are consistent 
with their personal, educational and career goals. These cours- 
es may include, but are certainly not limited to, such offerings 
as computer science, business, communications, psychology 
and sociology. 

Students graduating from vocational-technical high schools 
may substitute vocational-technical vocabulary course work 
for the foreign language requirement even if foreign language 
courses are offered in their high schools. Two vocational-techni- 
cal courses may be used to fulfill the two required electives. 

STANDARDIZED TEST SCORES 

Candidates for admission to the freshman class must submit the 
results of the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT Reasoning Test) or 
the American College Test (ACT). Candidates should have official 
score reports forwarded directly from the Educational Testing 
Program or the American College Testing Program during the 
academic year in which application is made to the college. 

For evaluation according to the provisions of Chapter 344, 
students with learning disabilities are expected to submit veri- 
fication from their guidance office. In most cases, a copy of the 
student's current Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) is the 
appropriate verifying document. More specific documentation 
may be required for academic advising and special services when 
students enroll. 

Chapter 344, Section 19 of the 1983 Acts and Resolves of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts states that: "No resident of the 
commonwealth who has been diagnosed as being developmental^ 
disabled, including but not limited to, having dyslexia or other spe- 
cific language disabilities, by any evaluation procedure prescribed 
by chapter seventy-one B, or equivalent testing, shall be required to 
take any standardized college entrance aptitude test to gain admit- 
tance to any public institution of higher education in the common- 
wealth. Admission shall be determined by all other relevant factors 
excluding standardized achievement testing." 

Candidates who graduated from high school three or more 
years prior to their planned entrance date are exempt from the 
standardized testing requirement. 

FRESHMAN ADMISSION REVIEW 

Freshman admission to Bridgewater State College is selective. 
The Massachusetts Board of Higher Education has established 
minimum admission standards that require candidates to earn a 
"B" average for the required high school units mentioned above. 
Students whose average falls below this requirement can also 
meet the standard by the use of a sliding scale that begins with 
compensating SAT scores above 920, or an ACT composite score 
above 1 9. No student can be admitted whose high school grade 
point average falls below "C." Detailed information about the 
BHE admission standards can be found on their Web site, 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



19 



BJsC 

UK I I H.I U M I K 

STATE rev tan* 



Undergraduate Admission 



www.mass.edu. Admission decisions at Bndgewater are based 
upon the strength of the candidate's academic profile as com- 
pared to the pool of applicants. Generally, more than 7,000 
applications are reviewed for a freshman class of 1,400. 

Since Bndgewater State College seeks students who will con- 
tribute to the college in a variety of ways, other factors are con- 
sidered in the admission decision. These include demonstrated 
leadership, participation in extracurricular activities, motivation, 
maturity and special aptitudes and talents. Letters of recommen- 
dation and any additional supporting information a candidate 
wishes to submit are welcomed and encouraged. 

Special consideration is given to applicants out of high school 
for three years or more, students from educationally disadvan- 
taged environments, working adults and candidates who exhibit 
exceptional potential. 

Interviews are not required. Students are encouraged to 
attend one of the many group information sessions offered 
throughout the year. Dates, times and a telephone reservation 
number are available in the Viewbook or on the college Web 
site, www.bridgew.edu. 

Additional information concerning admission procedures, 
application fees, standardized testing requirements for admis- 
sion, notification date and deferred enrollment may be found 
in the Viewbook. Copies may be obtained from the Office 
of Admission - Gates House, Bridgewater State College, 
Bridgewater, MA 02325. 



TRANSFER ADMISSION 
REQUIREMENTS 

Bridgewater State College welcomes applications from qualified 
transfer students. To qualify for transfer admission, a student 
must have earned 1 2 semester hours of transferable credit; oth- 
erwise the applicant is considered under freshman 
admission requirements. 

Transfer applicants will be evaluated on the basis of their pre- 
vious college work and must request an official transcript to be 
sent from each college or university attended. Transfer applicants 
who have earned fewer than 24 transferable credits must also 
submit to an official high school transcript and standardized 
testing results. 

It is expected that candidates for transfer admission will be 
in good standing at the last institution attended and will have 
earned a cumulative grade point average of 2.2 or higher on a 
4.0 scale. Students transferring fewer than 24 semester hours 
of credit must present a minimum cumulative grade point aver- 
age of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale. Special consideration may be granted 
for exceptional high school performance, evidence of maturity 
and motivation, or other extenuating circumstances and will be 
handled on an individual basis. Please note that these 
are minimum eligibility requirements and do not 
guarantee admission to the college or to a specific 
degree program. 

Transfer credit toward the degree will be granted for course work 
completed at other accredited institutions of higher education. A 
minimum grade of "C-" is required for credit transfer. Courses that 



do not have a direct equivalent at Bridgewater State College may 
be counted as fulfilling elective requirements in the curriculum. 
Transfer students are required to fulfill the same degree require- 
ments as any other student; however, any student who has com- 
pleted the general education requirements of one of the other 
Massachusetts State Colleges will not be subject to additional 
core curriculum requirements at Bridgewater State College. One 
half of the required courses in major and minor fields must be 
completed at Bridgewater State College. Students transferring 
from an accredited two-year institution are limited to 69 hours of 
transfer credit toward the degree. Students transferring from an 
accredited four-year institution are limited to 90 hours of transfer 
credit toward the degree. 

Grades for courses taken at an institution other than BSC 
are not used to compute a student's grade point average. Only 
courses actually taken at BSC are used to calculate a student's 
BSC grade point average. 



JOINT ADMISSION PROGRAM 

Bridgewater State College participates with the Massachusetts 
Community Colleges, Dean College and Quincy College in Joint 
Admission. This program guarantees admission to Bridgewater 
State College for transfers from participating institutions who are 
enrolled in preapproved programs of study, providing the associ- 
ate degree is completed. Joint Admission students must maintain 
a cumulative grade point average at the two-year college of 2.5 
or better to be eligible. 

Transfers indicate their desire to participate in Joint Admission 
by contacting either the Admissions Office or Transfer Office 
at their community college. A written application for Joint 
Admission can be filed upon enrollment at the two-year partici- 
pating institution. One semester prior to their planned enrollment 
at Bridgewater State College, Joint Admission students must file 
an Intent to Enroll form in lieu of a regular Bridgewater State 
College application. This form is available from the transfer coun- 
selor at the participating colleges or the Office of Admissions at 
Bridgewater State College. To complete the review process, an 
official transcript of all college work completed to date at any 
prior institution(s) and the community college must be requested 
by the applicant. BSC's Joint Admission deadlines are November 
1 for spring and March 1 for fall. 



COMMONWEALTH TRANSFER COMPACT 

For students transferring from Massachusetts 
community colleges to Bridgewater State College 
(effective January 1990) 

1) Requirements for Transfer Compact Status 

A student shall be eligible for transfer compact status if he or she 
has met the following requirements: 

• Completed an associate's degree with a minimum of 60 
hours exclusive of developmental course work. 

• Achieved a cumulative grade point average of not less than 
2.0 (in a 4.0 system) at the community college awarding the 
degree. This is merely a minimum grade point average and by 
no means guarantees admission. 



20 



Undergraduate Admission 



• Completed the following minimum core curriculum 
requirements, exclusive of developmental course work: 

English Composition/Writing 6 credit hours 
Behavioral and Social Science 9 credit hours 
Humanities and Fine Arts 9 credit hours 
Natural or Physical Science 8 credit hours 
Mathematics 3 credit hours 

The community college from which the student is applying is 
responsible for identifying on the transcript of the candidate that 
the student has fulfilled the compact specifications. 

2) Credits to be Transferred 

The 35 credits in core curriculum courses specified in section I 
will be applied toward the fulfillment of the Bridgewater State 
College general education requirements. 

A minimum of 25 additional credits will be accepted as 
transfer credits. These credits may be transferred as free electives 
toward any additional core curriculum requirements, toward 
the student's major, or any combination, as Bridgewater State 
College deems appropriate. 

Only college-level course credits consistent with the recom- 
mended standards set forth in the Undergraduate Experience 
publication are included under this compact. Credits awarded 
by the sending institution through CLEP, challenge examinations 
and other life experience evaluations for course credit may be 
included when the community college certifies that a student 
qualifies under this compact. 

3) Credits Beyond the Associate's Degree 

To complete the baccalaureate degree, a student who transfers 
under this compact may be required to take no more than 68 
additional credits unless: 

• The student changes his or her program upon entering 
Bridgewater State College, or 

• The combination of additional core curriculum requirements, 
if any, and the requirements of the student's major at the 
receiving institution total more than 68 credits. 

Under these circumstances, transfer students will be subject to 
the same requirements as students who began their undergradu- 
ate education at Bridgewater State College. 

4) Admission to Competitive Majors or Programs 

If because of space or fiscal limitations the receiving institution 
does not admit all qualified applicants to a given major or pro- 
gram, the receiving institution will use the same criteria for appli- 
cants who are transfer students under this compact as it does for 
its native students. 

5) Student Appeals 

A student who believes that the provisions of this compact have 
not been applied fairly has the right to appeal. 

Initially, differences of interpretation regarding the award 
of transfer credit shall be resolved between the student and 
the receiving institution. If a difference remains unresolved, 
the student shall present his or her evaluation of the situa- 
tion to the institution from which the student is transferring. 



Representatives from the two institutions shall then have the 
opportunity to resolve the differences. 

Absent a satisfactory resolution, differences of interpreta- 
tion may be presented to the State-Wide Transfer Coordinating 
Committee. 

DECISION AND NOTIFICATION DATES 

Early Action Program* 

Freshman candidates may apply under the Early Action Program. 
Candidates need to have fulfilled the standardized testing 
requirements on or before the November test date and will need 
to have their application complete and transcripts on file in the 
Office of Admissions by Nov. 16. 

Early Action applicants are notified by mid-December. The 
college either offers admission, denies admission or defers 
admission and reviews the application again during the regular 
admissions cycle. A student offered admission under the Early 
Action Program has until the May 1 Candidates Reply Date to 
respond to the college's offer. 

Regular Freshman Admission* 

Freshman applicants for the fall semester must submit their 
completed application by Feb. 1 5 for consideration. Candidates 
meeting this deadline are notified of the Admission Committee 
decision no later than April 1 5. A limited number of freshman 
candidates are accepted for the spring semester each year. The 
application deadline for priority consideration is Nov. 1 . 

Transfer Admission* 

Transfer applications should be filed by April 1 for September 
admission or by Nov. 1 for January admission for 
priority consideration. 

Notification for transfer candidates is done on a rolling 
basis as the application file becomes complete. Notification for 
September admission begins in March. 

*A student who has been denied admission to Bridgewaater 
State College may not register for courses at the college. 

Note: The college reserves the right to close admission at 
any time. 

REINSTATEMENT AND READMISSION 

Undergraduate students who have not registered for courses 
for one or more semesters, or who have been academically 
separated from the college and who wish to re-enroll must file 
an application for reinstatement/readmission with the Office of 
Admission. An official transcript from all colleges attended (if 
any) since last enrolling at BSC as well as a personal statement 
explaining the circumstances of separation/non-enrollment must 
be submitted with the application while meeting the above pub- 
lished priority deadlines for transfer students. 

Upon readmission/reinstatement, transfer credit, if applicable, 
will be awarded according to established policies. The grade 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Undergraduate Admission 



HR I IX/H A I I R 

STATE C:<X-Lfc(it 



point average achieved at BSC upon separation will be resumed 
as grades achieved at other institutions are not included when 
calculating a student's BSC grade point average. 

Students who have been academically separated from the col- 
lege must meet the requirements of separation outlined by their 
appropriate dean before being considered for readmission. 



INTERNATIONAL ADMISSION 

International students who wish to apply for admission to 
the college should address a letter of inquiry to the Office of 
Admission indicating their educational background and intended 
area of study. Eligible candidates will be mailed a special interna- 
tional student admission application packet and asked to submit 
official transcripts and credentials. Students for whom English is 
a second language will be required to submit an official copy of 
results from the "Test of English as a Foreign Language" (TOEFL), 
unless they have at least two years' experience in an American 
college or university. 

Documentation of financial support resources is required. 

All students applying as freshmen are required, in addition 
to TOEFL, to submit official results of the SATI Reasoning or ACT 
Assessment exam. 

During the initial orientation/registration period, international 
students' TOEFL examination records and academic transcripts 
will be evaluated for placement in appropriate English as a 
Second Language courses offered through the Department of 
Foreign Languages and in writing courses offered through the 
Department of English. In addition to the above-mentioned 
mandatory records, other institutional placement exams may be 
required. Candidates should begin the application procedure no 
less than nine months in advance of the expected date 
of admission. 



PLACEMENT POLICY FOR ESL 
POPULATIONS 

Students for whom English is a second language are evaluated 
and tested on their English proficiency upon admission to the 
college. Based on transcripts, Accuplacer, TOEFL and SAT scores, 
as well as precollege writing samples and other valid methods 
of language proficiency assessment, students are placed in an 
appropriate level of English as a Second Language (ESL) and 
writing. Depending on placement, students will complete to 6 
credits in ESL. Students can take three additional credits in ESL. 

Students are exempt from taking ESL courses based on the 
following criteria: 

• reading score of 68 or above on the Accuplacer 

• SAT verbal score of 450 or above 

• GPA of 3.00 or above from a high school in the United States 
or another English-speaking country 

• TOEFL score of or above 550 (paper-based) or 1 73 
(computer-based) 



PROGRAM FOR REGISTERED NURSES 

Provisions have been made for graduates of three-year diploma 
schools of nursing to complete programs leading to degrees in 
any of the academic majors being offered at the college. 

While encouraging registered nurses to pursue degree work 
for personal enrichment, the college supports the guidelines of 
the National League of Nursing for the professional education 
of nurses. These guidelines caution nurses whose career goals 
include the opportunity to assume supervisory and/or teaching 
responsibilities in the field of nursing, that degree programs to 
be pursued should be taken only at those institutions which offer 
degrees in nursing education. 

Through this special admission program, students accepted 
to the college are granted 60 credit hours for their school or 
nursing work. Where applicable, these credits may be used to 
meet core curriculum, major or elective requirements. As with 
all others transferring into the college, registered nurses are 
expected to meet the same degree requirements as outlined in 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 



NEW ENGLAND REGIONAL STUDENT 
PROGRAM 

Bridgewater State College participates in the New England 
Regional Student Program. The program is administered by 
the New England Board of Higher Education and is designed 
to permit qualified New England residents to study at the in- 
state tuition rate plus surcharge tuition in certain programs at 
Bridgewater State College. 

Information about the program can be obtained from the 
Bridgewater State College Office of Admission. 



ADVANCED STANDING 

Advanced standing with college credit is granted to entering stu- 
dents who have demonstrated college-level proficiency through 
established procedures. 

Advanced Placement Program 

Bridgewater State College participates in the Advanced 
Placement Program of the College Board, providing academic 
credit for students qualified for advanced placement stand- 
ing. Those interested should take the College Board Advanced 
Placement tests and have the results submitted to the Office of 
Admissions for evaluation. Students scoring three, four or five 
receive placement and credit from the college. 

College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

Bridgewater State College awards academic credits that students 
may earn though the College Level Exam Program (CLEP) of the 
College Board. 

Credit earned with CLEP examinations may be applied 
toward fulfilling core curriculum requirements, major and elec- 
tive requirements. The chart in this section provides information 
about the specific CLEP examinations and equivalent 
BSC courses. 



Undergraduate Admission 



BSC Course 



BSC Credit 



BUSINESS 



Financial Accounting (introduced 6/30/07) 


50 


ACF1 100 


6 


Introductory Business Law 


50 


ACFI 305 


3 


Information Systems and Computer Applications 


50 


COMP Elective 


3 


Principles of Management 


50 


MGMT130 


3 


Principles of Marketing 


50 


MGMT200 


3 



COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 



American Literature 




Analyzing and Interpreting Literature 



English Composition with Essay 
English Composition without 
English Literature 
Freshman College Com 
Humanities 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


French Language, Level 1 


50 


LAFR 101 and 102 


6 


French Language, Level 2 


59 


LAFR 101/102/151/252 


12 


German Language, Level 1 


50 


LAGE101 and 102 


6 


German Language, Level 2 


63 


LAGE 101/102/151/252 


12 


Spanish Language, Level 1 


50 


LASP101 and 102 


6 


Spanish Language, Level 2 


63 


LASP 101/102/151/200 


12 


HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 


American Government 


50 


POL1 172 


3 


Introduction to Educational Psychology 


50 


Free Elective 


3 


History of the United States I: Early 
Colonization to 1877 


50 


HIST 221 


3 


History of the United States II: 1865 to Present 


50 


HIST 222 


3 


Human Growth and Development 


50 


PSYC 224 


3 


Principles of Microeconomics 


50 


ECON 101 


3 


Principles of Macroeconomics 


50 


ECON 102 


3 


Introductory Psychology 


50 


PSYC 100 


3 


Social Sciences and History 


50 


Free Elective 


6 


Introductory Sociology 


50 


SOC1 102 


3 


Western Civilization I: Ancient Near East to 1648 


50 


HIST 111 


3 


Western Civilization II: 1648 to Present 


50 


HIST 112 


3 


SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 


Biology 


50 


BIOL 100/102 


8 


Calculus 


50 


MATH 141 


3 


Chemistry 


50 


CHEM 131/132 


4&3 


College Algebra 


50 


MATH 105 


3 


College Mathematics 


50 


MATH 100 and 105 


6 


Natural Sciences 


50 


BIOL 102 and Free Elective 


8 


Precalculus 


50 


MATH 100 


3 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Undergraduate Admission 



Credit by CLEP is regarded as transfer credit and is not reflect 
ed in the BSC grade point average. CLEP transcripts are regarded 
as four-year-school transfer credit and are counted towards the 
maximum allowance of transfer credit. CLEP credit does not sat- 
isfy residency requirements for financial aid, student housing or 
student medical insurance purposes 

CLEP credit may not be awarded if equivalent course work 
is completed either prior to or later than the equivalent CLEP 
examination or if the CLEP equivalent already appears on a stu- 
dent transcript. CLEP credit may not be retroactively substituted 
for requirements waived or satisfied though prior 
academic arrangement. 

Bridgewater State College follows the American Council 
of Education (ACE) recommendation that a student achieve a 
minimum score of 50 to earn credit for most CLEP examinations. 
Please note that some exams require higher scores to earn 
full credit. 

Students may arrange to take CLEP examinations at any of 
the national test centers, including Bridgewater State College. 
Those interested in taking CLEP examinations at BSC should con- 
tact the Office of Testing Services in the Academic Achievement 
Center at 508.531.1780. 

BSC Office of testing Services: www.bridgew.edu/ 
TestingServices 

College Board Online: www.collegeboard.com/clep 



SECOND DEGREE OPTION 

A student who has earned a bachelor's degree at Bridgewater 
State College or at another accredited institution may be admit- 
ted to the college to pursue an additional bachelor's degree in 
a field of study substantially different from the initial degree 
program. That student should make application through the 
Undergraduate Office of Admission, providing official transcripts 
from all previous colleges other than Bridgewater State College. 
Please note that second bachelor degree candidates are subject 
to transfer admission deadlines of April 1 for fall entrance and 
Nov. 1 for spring entrance. 

Admission is dependent on approval of the department in 
which the student wishes to pursue a major. Certain departments 
may recommend that the student pursue a graduate program 
with some prerequisite courses rather than a second bachelor's 
degree. Some majors have specific admission requirements 
and/or limited space, which may result in a student not being 
accepted into the desired major. 

For second undergraduate degree graduation requirements, 
see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of 
this catalog. 



NON-DEGREE STATUS 

A student who does not wish to seek a degree but who wishes to 
broaden his or her interests or to review or improve certain skills 
may register for courses as an undergraduate non-degree stu- 
dent at Bridgewater State College. A non-degree student should 
be aware, however, that he or she is not eligible for financial aid 
or various other services provided for degree-seeking students. 

A non-degree student must have a high school diploma or 
GED and must meet any prerequisites for the courses for which 
he or she wishes to register. A non-degree student must also 
maintain the same academic standards required of degree-seek- 
ing students (see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section 
of this catalog for more information regarding undergraduate 
academic standards). 

An undergraduate non-degree student may register for 
courses after the registration sessions for new degree-seeking 
students have been held in August and January. 

Once an undergraduate non-degree student has earned 1 5 or 
more credit hours, he or she must meet with a representative of 
the Office of Admission to determine the purpose of continuing 
as a non-degree student. If a non-degree student is seeking to 
obtain a degree from Bridgewater State College, he or she will 
be required to apply as a degree-seeking student and meet the 
admission requirements as outlined in the catalog. If admitted, 
the student must satisfy the requirements for a bachelor's degree 
under the catalog in effect at the time of matriculation and com- 
plete a minimum of 30 credit hours as a matriculated student. 

Note: A student who has been denied undergraduate admis- 
sion to Bridgewater State College may not register for courses at 
the college. 



Tuition and Fees 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



APPLICATION FEES 

A nonrefundable undergraduate application and processing 
fee of $25 is required of all students applying for admission. 
Upon acceptance, an advance tuition deposit of $ 1 00 must be 
submitted by May 1 for commuter students accepted for the 
fall semester. Students accepted with on-campus housing must 
also submit a $1 50 residence hall deposit. The tuition deposit is 
nonrefundable. 

All new students will be assessed an orientation fee upon 
entering the college. For students entering in the fall semester, 
this orientation fee will be $ 1 60 for freshmen and $80 for trans- 
fers and readmitted students. For the spring semester, the orien- 
tation fee is $80 for all students. 



be returned by the due date indicated on the bill. In an effort 
to aid our students with their tuition payments, we have made 
important changes regarding your student statement. Due to 
federal regulations, the signed certificates (the remittance por- 
tion of your statement) must be received by Bridgewater State 
College. See the Web page at www.bridgew.edu/studentac- 
counts/depts/fiscal/stuaccj.htm for the latest information on 
billing and payment procedures. Payment may be made by the 
following methods: 

1) Check or money order payable to Bridgewater State 
College mailed to our lock box facility as printed 

on the portion of the bill you return in the return 
envelope provided. 

2) MasterCard, Visa or Discover by providing your credit card 
number and expiration date: 

• call our cashiers at 508.531.1225. 

• Web: Select the Account Summary/Credit Card Payment link 
via your InfoBear account. 

• e-mail this information to your student representative at 
first initial, last name ©bridgew.edu (i.e.,jsmith@bridgew. 
edu for Jane Smith); if you are unsure of your student repre- 
sentative's name, please call the number listed above or visit 
the Web site listed above or 

• fax this information to 508.531.6163. 

3) Financial aid may be used to pay your tuition, fees, room, 
board, books, as well as flex points or dining points on 
your Connect Card. 

• Students who have received an award letter from the 
Financial Aid Office may claim the award specifically desig- 
nated for the semester. The amount to be claimed must be 
indicated on the bill and must be signed 

and returned by the due date to avoid cancellation of your 
course schedule. 

• Students wishing to claim credit for financial assistance from 
sources other than the Bridgewater State College Financial 
Aid Office (outside scholarships, waivers, loans, etc.) must 
do so by indicating the amount of assistance on the bill. 
Official documentation verifying the assistance must be 
enclosed with the bill, which must be returned by the due 
date or your course schedule will be cancelled. 

• Flex points may be used for laundry, vending, bookstore 
items and food services at any location on campus that 
accepts the Connect Card. For more information on the 
Connect Card please see www.bridgew.edu/PSCC/ 
ConnectCard.htm or call 508.531.2897. 

For your convenience there is a 24-hour drop box located 
in Boyden Hall on the first floor outside the Office of Student 
Accounts for your payments and signed bills. In addition, the 
Student Accounts Office is open evening hours the first two 
weeks of each semester Monday through Thursday, 8 am -7 pm. 

Students who take credits in excess of 1 1 8 percent of required 
credit hours for degree completion will be assessed a surcharge 
of $235 per credit hour for these credits. For example, students 
enrolled in baccalaureate programs may take up to 142 credits 
(118 percent of 1 20 minimum required credits) at no additional 
charge. Any credits taken in excess of 1 42 will be subject to the 



TUITION AND FEES 2008-2009 
ACADEMIC YEAR 

Daytime Course Charges 

Full-time undergraduate students who are Massachusetts resi- 
dents pay approximately $910 per year in tuition and $5,197 in 
required fees. Students residing on campus are charged between 
$5, 100 and $6,656 per year, depending on the facility occupied. 
Board for resident students is approximately $3, 1 00 per year. 
Please note that all figures are subject to change. 

For a breakdown of these costs, please see the Tuition and 
Fees table in the following pages. It should be noted this sched- 
ule is subject to change. Published tuition and fees are for the 
2008-2009 academic year. 

Evening Course Charges 

Students enrolled in evening undergraduate courses will be 
charged all tuition and fees associated with the cost to provide 
the evening programs. As a result, full-time undergraduate day 
students who enroll in an evening (or weekend) course may incur 
additional charges. Evening tuition is charged at $38 per credit 
hour with no credit hour maximum. Evening fees will be charged 
at $216.55 per credit hour with no credit hour maximum. Full- 
time undergraduate students who are Massachusetts residents 
taking 1 2 credit hours for evening courses pay approximately 
$910 per year in tuition and $5,197 in required fees. Students 
residing on campus are charged between $5,100 and $6,656 
per year, depending on the facility occupied. Board for resident 
students is approximately $3, 1 00 per year. Please note that all 
figures are subject to change. 

For a breakdown of these costs, please see "Semester Tuition 
and Fees" in the following pages. This schedule is subject 
to change. 

Billing and Fee Payment 

Students are billed through the Office of Student Accounts 
twice annually, in July and November, prior to the start of each 
semester. Bills are sent to students at their permanent addresses 
as maintained in the Registrar's Office. It is critical to notify the 
office immediately if your permanent address changes. Please 
visit the Registrar's Office, Boyden Hall, Room 003, or print the 
Change of Address Form found at www.bridgew.edu. Bills must 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgewedu/catdlogladdenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 









BRIIX'tWATfcK 
SIAII ( l)!ll(>l 







Tuition and Fees 



S235 per credit hour surcharge. In determining accumulated 
credit hours, students should exclude from their total any credits 
transferred in from other institutions. 

Senior Citizens 

Tuition and 1/2 fees in the day and/or 1/2 tuition and 1/2 fees for 
courses 4 pm or after are waived to any person 60 years of age or 
older. The person must pay 1/2 fees and bring proof of age to the 
Registrar's Office to be eligible. 

SGA (Student Government Association) Fee 

This fee is charged to all matriculated undergraduate students 
attending classes. 

Fewer than 1 2 semester hours S25.00 

1 2 semester hours or more $50.00 

Other Fees 

Health Insurance Fee (waivable) $1,189.00 

Parking Decal Fee (waivable) 8 credits or less $50.00 

9 credits or more $125.00 

Software Fee $15.00 

Hospitalization/Major Medical coverage for all students carry- 
ing nine credits or more is required by Massachusetts state law. 
A Student Health Insurance brochure can be obtained from the 
Office of Student Accounts 508.53 1 .1 225 or the Office of Health 
Services 508.53 1 . 1 252. If a student is covered under a similar 
plan and wishes to waive the coverage, he/she must complete a 
waiver form which will be mailed along with your bill and return 
it to the Office of Health Services prior to payment of your bill. 
Failure to do so will leave an outstanding balance due on the 
student's bill. 

Full Year $1,189.00 

Spring $699.00 

Distance Learning Fee 
(interactive video conferencing courses, 
telecourses, teleweb courses and 

video courses) $50.00 

Official Transcript Charge (per copy with 

2-5 working days to process) $2.00 

On-the-Spot Official Transcript Charge $5.00 

SEMESTER RESIDENCE HALL AND 
DINING CHARGES 

Room 

Pope and Scon Halls* $2,570.00 

Woodward Hall* $2,614.00 

Shea/Durgin Halls* $2,614.00 

East Hall (Single) $2,965.00 

(Double) $2,652.00 

Crimson Hall (Single) $3,328.00 

(Double) $3,068.00 

Student Apartments* $2,550.00 

DiNardo/Miles* $2,876.00 

Mandatory Residential Activity Fee $10.00 

* Single rooms are $ 1 50.00 more per semester 



DINING CHARGES 



Meal 



Per Semester Rates 



Plan 


Base Meal 


Din. $$$* 


Guest 


Cost 


Plan A 


210 


$21000 


5 


$1550.00 


Plan B 


75 


$500.00 


5 


$1508.00 


PlanC 


15 


$200.00 


N/A 


$312.00** 


* Dining Dollars expire the end of each semester. 
•• Great Hill Student Apartments ONLY 



TUITION MANAGEMENT PLAN 

In order to assist students in financing their education, the 
college has contracted exclusively with Tuition Management 
Systems. This company's plan offers a low-cost, flexible system 
for financing educational expenses out of current income 
through regularly scheduled payments over a 10-month 
period. For information call Tuition Management Systems, 
1 .800.722.4867, or refer to the Tuition Management Systems 
Web site www.afford.com. 

REFUND POLICY 

Notification Requirements 

All undergraduate matriculated (degree seeking) students who 
withdraw from school must communicate that withdrawal in writ- 
ing through the Academic Achievement Center. 

All graduate matriculated (degree seeking) students who 
withdraw from school (program) must communicate that with- 
drawal in writing through the (School of Graduate Studies). 

All withdrawals from courses must be communicated by the 
student in writing through the Registrar's Office. 

Nonattendance at class does not constitute official with- 
drawal and will result in a failing grade. Students are responsible 
for all course charges except when an official withdrawal from 
college form is on file. 

1) Standard and "Non-Standard Date" 
Semester Courses 

Policy 1.1. Full-Semester Courses. Refunds for full-semester 
courses will be awarded as follows: 1 00 percent refund dur- 
ing the drop/add period; 85 percent refund in the second 
week, during the four weekdays after the drop/add period has 
ended; and a 70 percent refund during the third week of the 
semester. No refund will be available thereafter. 

Policy 1.2. Seven-Week Quarter Courses. Refunds for 
seven-week quarter courses will be awarded as follows: 
100 percent refund during the drop/add period; 70 percent 
refund during weekdays 4 and 5 of the quarter. No refund 
will be available thereafter. 

Policy 1.3. Odd-Day, Non-Standard Courses. The refund for 
odd-day, non-standard courses will be a 100 percent 
refund during the drop/add period. No refund will be 
available thereafter. 



26 



Tuition and Fees 



b!sc 



BRIPGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



2) Noncredit Courses Offered Through 
Continuing Education 

Policy 2.1. Nontechnology Courses. The refund for nontech- 
nology courses will be 1 00 percent prior to the start of the 
course. No refund will be available thereafter. 

Policy 2.2.A. Technology Courses (deposits). The refund policy 
for deposits for technology courses will be 1 00 percent five or 
more days (including weekend days) prior to the start of class; 
no refund for four or fewer days (including weekend days) 
prior to the start of class. 

Policy 2.2.B. Technology Courses (course fee). The refund poli- 
cy for course fees for technology courses will be 90 percent up 
to the end of the first class; no refund thereafter. 

3) Summer Courses 

Policy 3.1. Five-week Summer Courses. Refunds for five-week 
summer courses will be awarded as follows: 1 00 percent 
refund during the drop/add period; 70 percent refund during 
weekdays four and five of the summer session; and no 
refund thereafter. 

Policy 3.2. 1 0-Week Summer Courses. Refunds for 1 0-week 
summer courses will be awarded as follows: 1 00 percent 
refund during the drop/add period; 70 percent refund during 
the three weekdays after the drop/add period has ended; and 
no refund thereafter. 

Policy 3.3. Odd-Day, Non-Standard Courses. The refund for 
these courses will be 1 00 percent during the drop/add period; 
no refund thereafter. 

4) Housing, Meal Plan, and Dining and Flex Dollars 

Policy 4.1. Housing. Refunds for housing will be awarded as 
follows: 100 percent refund during the drop/add period; 85 
percent refund in the second week, during the four weekdays 
after the drop/add period has ended; and a 70 percent refund 
during the third week of the semester. No refund thereafter. 

Policy 4.2. Meal Plan - Dining. Refunds for Meal Plan - 
Dining options will be awarded as follows: 1 00 percent refund 
during the drop/add period; 85 percent refund in the second 
week, during the four weekdays after the drop/add period has 
ended; and a 70 percent refund during the third week of the 
semester. No refund thereafter. 

Policy 4.3.A. Flex Dollars (Students). Flex dollars carry from 
year to year and balances greater than $20* are refundable at 
the time of graduation/withdrawal from the college. 

• If the student's college account is paid in full, we will issue 
a refund to the cardholder within 60 days of graduation 
or withdrawal. 

• If the student has an outstanding balance with the college, 
we will apply the flex dollars balance to that account. 

Policy 4.3. B. Flex Dollars (Employees). Flex dollars carry from 
year to year and balances greater than $20* are refundable 
at the end of employment with the college. A refund will be 
issued within 60 days of the end of employment. 

*There will be a $20 processing fee deducted from the balance 
prior to refund. 



RETURN OF FINANCIAL AID POLICY 

Students who receive financial aid and withdraw from the college 
during the semester may not be eligible for their entire financial 
aid award. A revised financial aid award notice will be mailed to 
students once awards have been adjusted. Bridgewater State 
College must return federal and state grants, loans and scholar- 
ships to the federal or state government based on the student's 
length of enrollment. The student may retain only a prorated 
portion of the federal and state aid awarded based on the length 
of the term and the student's withdrawal date. The remainder 
of the student's financial aid must be returned by BSC to the 
Department of Education or Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
If the student received a cash disbursement of aid, he or she may 
owe a repayment to BSC or to the federal government. 

The Return of Title IV Funds requirement remains in effect 
until the 60 percent point of the semester. See Web site for actual 
dates in the current semester. After those dates the student may 
retain all financial aid. 

Bridgewater State College uses the Federal Return of Title IV 
Funds formula and dates to calculate the amount of institutional 
scholarship/grant funds a withdrawn student may retain. 

It is very possible that a student who receives financial aid and 
withdraws during the Return of Title IV funds period will owe a 
balance to the BSC Student Accounts Office and may be required to 
repay funds to the U.S. Department of Education. 

All undergraduate, matriculated (degree seeking) students 
who withdraw from school must notify, in writing, both the 
Academic Achievement Center and the Financial Aid Office. 

All graduate, matriculated (degree seeking) students who 
withdraw from school (program) must notify, in writing, both the 
School of Graduate Studies and the Financial Aid Office. 

Note: Federal, State or Institutional regulations, 
and/or action by the Board of Higher Education may 
necessitate revision to the above Return of Financial 
Aid Policy. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Tuition and Fees 



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Financial Aid 



The mission of the Financial Aid Office at Bndgewater State 
College is to assist students and parents in financing their edu- 
cation. Our main goal is to ensure access for all who desire to 
pursue higher education. 

Financial aid award packages may consist of a combination of 
resources such as grant, scholarship, tuition waiver, work-study 
and loan. An award package is always dependent on the avail- 
ability of funds from the state and federal government. Awarding 
of funds is based on "need," which is the difference between 
the cost of attendance (COA) and the Expected Family 
Contribution (EFC). 

The cost of attendance includes direct expenses such as 
tuition and fees, and also incorporates estimated costs for 
books and supplies, room and board, transportation and per- 
sonal expenses. The expected family contribution is determined 
by using the federal need analysis formula when the Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is completed and 
processed. The difference between the two is the "need," which 
is met by financial aid funds. 

COST OF ATTENDANCE 
- FAMILY CONTRIBUTION 
= FINANCIAL NEED 

All students who desire consideration for financial aid funds 
must complete the FAFSA each year. FAFSA on the Web (www. 
fafsa.ed.gov) is the easiest and fastest way to apply. The entire 
process can be completed electronically when both the student 
and the parent apply for a Personal Identification Number (PIN), 
which allows the family to sign the application electronically. 
Apply at www.pin.ed.gov. The PIN permits a family to sign and 
access the FAFSA year after year; there is no need to reapply for 
a PIN each year. 

To obtain priority consideration for financial aid funds, the 
federal government must receive the student's completed FAFSA 
by March 1 s ' of the award year. This is a receipt date, not a post- 
mark date. Electronic applications are considered received when 
applicants click the "submit" button at the end of the application 
process from their computer. Applicants should print a copy of 
their confirmation page when applying online. 

Applications are accepted after the March 1 sl priority date, but 
awards will be made on a funds-available basis. Applications for 
the spring semester are accepted on a rolling basis. 

Students must reapply for financial aid funds each year they 
attend the college. Although the amount and type of aid offered 
may be changed due to funding availability and program guide- 
lines, an applicant will continue to be eligible as long as financial 
need is demonstrated and the student maintains satisfactory aca- 
demic progress. Please see the section of Satisfactory Academic 
Progress and Student Financial Aid. 

The college has strict guidelines regarding refunds of tuition 
and the distribution of financial aid funds for students who with- 
draw from the institution. Please refer to the refund section of 
this catalog. 

Financial aid is available for study abroad. 



For a complete list and description of financial aid programs, 
see www.bridgew.edu/financialaid/FinAidPrograms.dm or con- 
tact the Financial Aid Office at 508.53 1 . 1 34 1 for details. 



SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS AND 
STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) is a federal policy that mea- 
sures two components: quantitative and qualitative progress. 

The quantitative portion requires students attending an insti- 
tution that awards federal financial aid be making progress 
toward the completion of their degree within a reasonable 
period of time. All attempted credits count toward the calcula- 
tion, and withdrawals, failures and incomplete grades will all 
negatively impact a student's progress. The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and Bridgewater State College's institutional 
financial aid programs adhere to the same standards. Since Stan-, 
dards are applied to all students, one does not necessarily have 
to be a financial aid applicant to fall under the auspices of 
this regulation. 

The maximum time frame for completing an undergraduate 
degree is 1 50 percent of the published length of the program. 
For programs that are 1 20 credits, students would be allowed to 
attempt no more than 180 credits before completing the require- 
ments for their degree. Generally, for full-time students, this is 
equal to six years. Students who have not completed their degree 
within this parameter would be deemed ineligible for 
financial aid. 

Since students have 1 50 percent of the published length 
of a program to complete their degree, they must complete at 
least 75 percent of all credits attempted to maintain compliance 
with the satisfactory progress standards. Courses that do not 
carry credit, but are successfully completed, are not considered 
punitive under the calculation. Progress is measured over time, 
and the entire academic record is reviewed at the end of each 
academic year. Repeating classes for which a passing grade has 
already been earned will negatively impact a student's progress 
since no additional credits are earned, but additional credits are 
attempted. Students who do not meet the college's standards are 
notified of the loss of financial aid eligibility prior to the start of 
the next semester. When students are notified of their ineligibility, 
they are also given the opportunity to appeal, in writing, based 
on mitigating circumstances. Summer classes are included as 
attempted and/or completed credits in the following academic 
year (unless a special condition is imposed by the Satisfactory 
Progress Committee). 

To remain in compliance with the satisfactory academic 
progress policy, a completion rate of 75 percent is required. 
Simply stated, students must complete at least 75 percent of all 
attempted credits over time. To determine the number of credits 
required to maintain satisfactory progress, multiply the total 
number of attempted credits by 75 percent. 



Financial Aid 



The following chart provides an example: 



Total of Required to 

Student Attempted Complete 

Example Credits (75 percent) 

#1 30 23 

#2 20 15 

#3 65 49 

#4 9 7 



All appeals are reviewed by the Satisfactory Progress 
Committee, whose representatives are from the Registrar's 
Office, Academic Achievement Center and the Financial Aid 
Office. Decisions by the committee are final. Students whose 
appeals are approved will have their financial aid eligibility rein- 
stated on a probationary basis. These students must be especially 
diligent in completing all attempted credits until compliance with 
the policy is reestablished. In some cases, a student's eligibility 
may be regained for only one semester, with the stipulation that 
the student successfully complete all attempted credits to regain 
eligibility for the next semester. 

Transfer credits are not evaluated toward the BSC comple- 
tion rate that is performed at the end of each academic year. 
However, transfer credits will affect the maximum time frame in 
which students must earn their degree. For example, a student 
who transfers 60 credits toward an undergraduate degree would 
presumably have to earn 60 more credits to complete their BSC 
degree. Using the federal 1 50 percent rule, the students would 
be allowed to attempt only 90 more credits before losing finan- 
cial aid eligibility. 

The qualitative component of the policy deals with progress as 
it relates to the student's Grade Point Average (GPA). Satisfactory 
academic progress standards adhere to the college's policy for 
academic standards. (See chart below.) Students who are aca- 
demically separated from the college are not eligible for financial 
aid funds unless they successfully appeal to the appropriate 
academic dean and are subsequently reinstated. If such a student 
has met the quantitative component of the Satisfactory Academic 
Progress policy, no further appeal is required, and financial aid 
can be reinstated. However, if the quantitative standard has not 
been met, the student must present an additional appeal to the 
satisfactory progress committee. 

Academic Standards: 



Credit 






Separation 


Hours 


Academic 


Probation 


Below 


Attempted 


Warning 


GPA 


This GPA 


0-16 


2.0-2.19 


Below 2.0 


1.00 


17-31 


2.0-2.19 


Below 2.0 


1.50 


32-46 


2.0-2.19 


Below 2.0 


1.65 


47-61 


2.0-2.19 


Below 2.0 


1.75 


62-89 


2.0-2.19 


Below 2.0 


1.85 



Eligibility can be regained in two ways: students who are 
deemed ineligible may find an alternative funding source, con- 
tinue to take classes and regain eligibility on their own over time, 
or students may instead decide to appeal to the Satisfactory 
Progress Committee. Students who submit their appeal by the 
deadline that is communicated in their letter will retain their 



on-time status if their FAFSA was received by the published pre- 
ferred deadline of March 1 and all other required documents, if 
any, are submitted to the Financial Aid Office in a timely manner. 
Appeals received after the deadline, if approved, will be awarded 
on a funds-available basis regardless of the FAFSA receipt date. 
Appeals will be reviewed throughout the academic year. 

This policy may be subject to changes or updates. The policy 
on the financial aid Web page supersedes the policy in 
this catalog. 



STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

In addition to the Federal Work Study Program, Bridgewater State 
College provides opportunities for employment both on and 
off campus through the Student Employment Center located in 
Boyden Hall. Services of the center are open to all Bridgewater 
State College students regardless of financial aid status. 



ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Bridgewater Alumni Association provides scholarships to 
Bridgewater undergraduate students. These individual scholar- 
ships are provided by separate trust funds, each specifying the 
particular criteria to be utilized in selecting a recipient for that 
award. Application forms are available during February each year 
and may be accessed on the BSC Web site at www.bridgew.edu. 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIPS 

A limited number of graduate assistantships are offered by the 
School of Graduate Studies, subject to the availability of funds, in 
areas associated with certain programs of the college. For details 
regarding graduate assistantships, see the "School of Graduate 
Studies" section of the catalog. 



OTHER SCHOLARSHIPS 

In order to give recognition and prestige to student achievement 
on campus, many academic departments, clubs and campus 
organizations sponsor scholarships and monetary awards to 
deserving Bridgewater State College students. A complete listing 
may be found in the Bridgewater State College Handbook and 
further information regarding application procedures may be 
obtained in the Office of Student Affairs, or on the BSC Web site 
at www.bridgew.edu. 



VETERANS' AFFAIRS 

The Office of Veterans' Affairs provides general information on 
Veterans Educational Assistance programs, educational guidance 
and other related assistance. The office is also responsible for 
maintaining veterans' benefit records and for submitting 
necessary documentation for initial enrollment and continuing 
eligibility benefits. 

Students who may be eligible for educational benefits include 
students who are enrolled in day or evening classes, either full- 
or part-time in undergraduate, graduate and some certificate 
programs and are veterans of World War II, Korean, Vietnam and 
post-Vietnam eras; men and women in the Reserves or National 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Financial Aid 



Guard; husbands, wives, widows, widowers and children of 
veterans whose death or permanent and total disabilities were 
service connected, service connected disabled veterans, depen- 
dents of servicemen missing in action or prisoners of war for 
more than 90 days. 

For information concerning the Veterans' Educational 
Assistance programs, the National Guard and selective reserve 
programs or the state tuition waiver program, please contact 
the Veterans' Affairs Office, Financial Aid Office, Tillinghast Hall, 
or call or visit between the hours of 8:30 am and 5 pm, Monday 
through Friday. Telephone 508.531.1341. 



AIR FORCE RESERVE OFFICER TRAINING 
CORPS (ROTC) 

Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) is an educa- 
tional and leadership program designed to provide young men 
and women the opportunity to become Air Force officers while 
completing a bachelor's or master's degree. The Air Force ROTC 
program prepares students to assume challenging positions of 
responsibility and importance in the Air Force. 

Through a cross-enrolled program with Boston University, 
interested Bridgewater State College students may partici- 
pate in the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps Program. 
Requirements include yearly Aerospace Studies classes, 
Leadership Laboratory classes, and physical fitness training. 
Mandatory weekly time commitments range from 5 to 7 hours. 
Once students complete their degree, the Air Force offers a wide 
variety of career fields from which to choose including flying, 
opportunities as a pilot, navigator or weapons controller. The Air 
Force has opportunities for students of any major. 

In addition to the tremendous leadership and management 
training that cadets receive, they can also benefit from several 
scholarship programs. 

If you are interested in joining the Air Force ROTC program 
or want additional information, contact the Department of 
Aerospace Studies, Boston University, 1 18 Bay State Road 
Boston, MA 022 1 5 at 6 1 7.353.63 16 or 4705. 

Classes are held at Boston University. You can also visit the 
detachment Web site at www.bu.edu/af-rotc. 




32 



Undergraduate Academic Programs 



BACHELOR OF ARTS/BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE 

The Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degree programs pre- 
pare students for fields of endeavor related to the following areas 
of study and for graduate school. Some of the degree programs 
prepare students for secondary, middle school or PreK- 12 specialist 
teaching if secondary education is selected as a minor. 

Accounting and Finance 

Anthropology 

Art 

Athletic Training 

Aviation Science 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Chemistry-Geology 

Communication Studies 

Computer Science 

Criminal Justice 

Earth Sciences 

Economics 

English 

Geography 

Health Education 

History 

Management 

Mathematics 

Music 

Philosophy 

Physical Education 

Physics 

Political Science 
Psychology 
Social Work 
Sociology 
Spanish 

The decision as to whether to award the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts or the degree of Bachelor of Science shall be consistent with 
the standards in the student's major field as determined by the 
major department. 

In cases where students with double or dual majors are 
eligible for a BA, BS and/or BSE degree, the student will select 
which major department will make the decision regarding the 
degree to be awarded. 

Students are advised to consult with their department chair- 
person or major adviser early in their academic career, but no 
later than the end of the sophomore year, in order to be 
certain that course selection will allow graduation with the 
desired degree. 



Students should be aware that not all courses are offered in 
the evening. Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm 
or after should consult the appropriate department chairperson 
for information about the availability of evening sections of 
courses required in a specific major, concentration and/or minor. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

All candidates for Massachusetts Educator Licensure are advised 
to check with their individual education departments or 
the School of Education and Allied Studies regarding proposed 
regulations changes that may have an impact on their 
licensure program. 

All undergraduate and graduate students seeking licen- 
sure must consult the section of this catalog titled "School of 
Education and Allied Studies" for important licensure information 
including institutional deadlines. 

The Bachelor of Science in Education is offered in the follow- 
ing areas: 

Early Childhood Education 
Elementary Education 
Special Education 

In cases where students with double or dual majors are 
eligible for a BA, BS and/or BSE degree, the student will select 
which major department will make the decision regarding the 
degree to be awarded. 

Students should be aware that not all courses are offered in 
the evening. Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm 
or after should consult the appropriate department chairperson 
for information about the availability of evening sections of 
courses required in a specific major, concentration and/or minor. 



MAJOR 

Students must meet all requirements of the major as specified 
under the departmental listings. A minimum of 30 credits and 
a maximum of 36 credits within the major may be required by 
a department. The 30 to 36 credits reflect all courses taken in 
the major department, including those that are listed under the 
distribution of Core Curriculum Requirements. At least one half of 
the required courses in the major field (excluding cognate require- 
ments) must be successfully completed at this college. A minimum 
2.0 GPA in the major is required for graduation. The major GPA 
includes all courses completed in the major field (excluding cog- 
nate requirements). The minor GPA includes all courses required for 
completion of the minor, regardless of the department in which the 
courses are offered. Students should select a major by the end of 
the sophomore year. 



DOUBLE MAJOR 

In order to graduate with a double major, students must meet all 
requirements of both majors. Completion of the double major 
will be reflected on the finalized transcript. 

Students who wish to be elementary, early childhood or 
special education teachers are required to select a major in 
elementary, early childhood or special education and a major in 
the liberal arts or sciences. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Undergraduate Academic Programs 



CONCENTRATION 

A concentration is a unified set of courses usually composed of 
core requirements and of those additional course requirements 
particular to the chosen area of concentration. The total number 
of core and particular requirements must be at least 24 but not 
more than 36 credit hours. Cognate courses (required courses 
outside the major department) are not counted as part of the 
36 hours. Only students selecting the major field of study may 
complete a concentration within that major. The concentration is 
noted on the transcript. Concentrations are available in: 

Accounting and Finance 

Accounting 
Finance 

Anthropology 

Cultural Anthropology 
General Anthropology 
Public Archaeology 

Art 

Art Education 
Art History 
Crafts 
Fine Arts 
Graphic Design 
Photography 

Aviation Science 

Aviation Management 
Flight Training 

Biology 

Biomedical/Molecular Biology 
Environmental Biology 
General Biology 

Chemistry 

Biochemistry 
Environmental Chemistry 
Professional Chemistry 

Communication Studies 

Corporate Communication 
Individualized 

Media Studies and Communication Technologies 
Speech Communication 
Dance Education 
Theater Arts 
Theater Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Early Education and Care, PreK-K 

Earth Sciences 

General 

Environmental Geosciences 
Geology 

English 

English Education (High School, Middle School) 
Writing 



Health Education 

Community Health 
School Health 

History 

Military History 

Management 

General Management 

Energy and Environmental Resources Management 
Global Management 
Information Systems Management 
Marketing 

Operations Management 
Transportation 

Music 

Music Education 
Philosophy 
Applied Ethics 
Physical Education 

Coaching 

Exercise Science/Health Fitness 

Motor Development Therapy/Adapted Physical Education 

Recreation 

Recreation and Fitness Club Administration 
Teacher Licensure in Physical Education (PreK-8) 
Teacher Licensure in Physical Education (5-12) 

Physics 

General Physics 
Professional Physics 

Political Science 

American Politics 
International Affairs 
Legal Studies 
Public Administration 

Psychology 

Child Psychology 

Industrial and Organizational Psychology 
Medical and Health Psychology 

Sociology 

City, Community and Region 

Education 

Global Studies 

Special Education 

Communication Disorders 

MINOR 

A minor is a unified set of courses chosen outside of the major 
field of study requiring not less than 1 8 nor more than 2 1 hours. 
The minor is recorded on the student's transcript. Minors may 
include courses from only one department or may be interdisci- 
plinary. Students may use courses that satisfy Core Curriculum 
Requirements or departmental requirements to fulfill interdisci- 
plinary minor requirements unless otherwise prohibited. At least 



34 



Undergraduate Academic Programs 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



one half of the courses required for the minor must be success- 
fully completed through Bridgewater State College. Students 
must achieve a minimum 2.0 cumulative average in declared 
minors. The minor GPA includes all courses required for comple- 
tion of the minor regardless of the department in which the 
courses are offered. Specific requirements for a minor are found 
under the departmental descriptions. 

Minors are offered in: 

Accounting and Finance 
Actuarial Science 
American Studies 
Anthropology 
Art 

Art History 
Asian Studies 
Aviation Science 
Biochemistry 
Biology 
Biotechnology 
Canadian Studies 
Chemistry 

Civic Education and Community Leadership 
Coaching 

Communication Disorders 
Communication Studies 
Computer Science 
Criminal Justice 
Dance 

Earth Sciences 

Economics 

English 

Environmental Biology 

Ethnic Studies 

Exercise Physiology 

Forensic Psychology 

Geography 

Geophysics 

Health Promotion 

Health Resources Management 

History 

Inclusive Practices in Special Education and Communication 

Disorders 
Irish-American Studies 
Latin American and Caribbean Studies 
Management 
Mathematics 
Middle East Studies 
Music 
Philosophy 
Physics 

Political Science 
Portuguese 

Professional Practices in Special Education and Communication 

Disorders 
Psychology 
Public History 
Public Relations 
Recreation 



Russian and East European Studies 
Secondary Education 

(High School, Middle School, PreK-12 Specialist)* 
Social Welfare 
Sociology 
Spanish 
Theater Arts 
Urban Affairs 

Women's and Gender Studies 

* Students who wish to become middle school, secondary teach- 
ers or PreK-1 2 specialists elect a minor in secondary education 
and a major from one of the major fields offered. This minor 
requires more than 21 hours in order to satisfy Massachusetts 
licensure standards. 

All candidates for Massachusetts Educator Licensure are 
advised to check with their individual education departments or 
the School of Education and Allied Studies regarding proposed 
regulations changes which may have an impact on their 
licensure program. 

All undergraduate and graduate students seeking licen- 
sure must consult the section of this catalog titled "School of 
Education and Allied Studies" for important information includ- 
ing institutional deadlines. 



CORE CURRICULUM REQUIREMENTS 

Bridgewater State College's core curriculum was developed to 
serve as the educational foundation that all Bridgewater State 
College students will build on to complete their program of study. 
The core curriculum features a skills-centered, outcomes-based 
distribution model of general education that allows students a 
wide choice of courses and the flexibility to integrate the require- 
ments of their major with the broader, liberal education that is 
required of responsible citizens of the 21 st century. Students who 
complete the BSC core curriculum will learn a significant body of 
factual knowledge as well as understand the intellectual founda- 
tions, conceptual frameworks, and methodologies of the major 
academic disciplines. 

The BSC core curriculum is composed of four main 
areas: 

Skill Requirements: All students are required to demonstrate 
proficiency in the skill areas of writing, logical reasoning, math- 
ematical reasoning, and spoken communication. 

Core Distribution Requirements: All students will learn 
about the arts, humanities, the natural and social and behavior- 
al sciences, global culture, multiculturalism, application of quan- 
titative skills and the U.S. and Massachusetts Constitutions. 

Seminars: The First and Second Year Seminars are key fea- 
tures of the BSC core curriculum. These topic courses will allow 
students to explore an area of interest in a small, discussion- 
oriented course. The First Year Seminar is a writing intensive 
course designed to engage the student in college-level learning. 
The Second Year Seminar is either speaking or writing intensive 
and will engage students in the connections between classroom 
learning and the world. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Undergraduate Academic Programs 



BSC 



BRI DC. fc WATER 

STATE COLLtCt 



Requirements in the major: To conned the Core Curriculum 
with each major, students will complete one writing intensive 
course in their major and will be able to demonstrate information 
literacy and technology proficiency in their major. 

Core Skills Requirements 

ENGL 101 Writing I (CWR1)* 
ENGL 102 Writing II (CWR2)* 

Foundations of Logical Reasoning (CLOR)* 

Se/ecf one course: 

MATH 180 Transition to Advanced Mathematics 
PHIL 111 Foundations of Logical Reasoning 

Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning (CMAR)** 

Se/ecf one course 

MATH 100 Precalculus Mathematics 
MATH 105 Selected Topics in Mathematics 
MATH 107 Principles of Mathematics I 
MATH 108 Principles of Mathematics II 
MATH 110 Elementary Statistics I 
MATH 120 Introduction to Linear Algebra 
MATH 130 Discrete Mathematics I 
MATH 141 Elements of Calculus I 
MATH 142 Elements of Calculus II 
MATH 144 Applied Calculus for Business 
MATH 151 Calculus I 
MATH 152 Calculus II 

Spoken Communication (CSPK)** 

Se/ecf one course. 

COMM 130 Human Communication Skills 
COMM 250 Public Speaking 
THEA 210 Oral Interpretation 

Core Distribution Requirements*** 

These courses will not satisfy the Core Skills Requirements. A 
course may be applied to a Core Distribution Requirement and 
one or more of the Additional Distribution Requirements. All 
requirements must be met. 

Fine and Performing Arts (CFPA) 

Select two courses from below: 

ARTH 101 Introduction to Art 

ARTH 102 Introduction to Architecture 

ARTH 103 Survey of Ancient and Medieval Art 

ARTH 104 Survey of Art from the 14 th Century to the Present 

ARTH 203 American Art and Architecture 

ARTH 205 Asian Art Survey: India, China and Japan 

ARTH 207 Introduction to African Art 

ARTH 208 Survey of Islamic Art and Architecture 

ARTH 211 Monuments as Cultural Symbols and Emblems 

of Power 
ARTH 214 Art History Study Tour 
ARTH 215 Themes in the Visual Arts 
ARTH 217 African-American Art 

* Must be taken in 1" year 
** Must be taken in 2 nd year 
*** May be taken anytime 



ARTH 218 History of Photography 
ARTH 219 Mesoamerican Art and Architecture 
ARTH 220 United States Art Study Tour 
ARTH 308 Women in the Visual Arts 
ARTH 311 Orientalism 

ARTS 104 Introduction to Digital Imaging and 4-D Design 

ARTS 125 Drawing I 

ARTS 130 Two-Dimensional Design 

ARTS 140 Three-Dimensional Design 

ARTS 204 Time-Based Art 

MUSC 120 Class Guitar I (Classical Guitar) 

MUSC 130 Voice Class I 

MUSC 140 Class Piano I 

MUSC 160 Music: A Listening Approach 

MUSC 162 Music in African Culture 

MUSC 163 Music of the Non-Western World 

MUSC 165 Introduction to Women Composers 

MUSC 166 Survey of American Jazz 

MUSC 168 American Popular Music 

MUSC 170 Music Fundamentals 

MUSC 240 Class Piano II 

PHED/THEA 146 Dance Appreciation 

PHED/THEA 255 Creative Dance I 

PHED/THEA 260 World Dance 

THEA 110 Theater Appreciation 

THEA 115 Play Production 

THEA 120 Introduction to Acting 

THEA/PHED 146 Dance Appreciation 

THEA 222 Asian Theater 

THEA 226 Children's Theater 

THEA 236 The American Musical Theater 

THEA/PHED 255 Creative Dance I 

THEA/PHED 260 World Dance 

Humanities (CHUM) 

Select three courses from below: 

ENGL 211 Literary Classics of Western Civilization to 1600 

ENGL 214 The Classical Tradition 

ENGL 221 Major British Writers to 1800 

ENGL 222 Major British Writers since 1800 

ENGL 231 Major American Writers to 1865 

ENGL 232 Major American Writers since 1865 

ENGL 233 Introduction to the African-American Novel 

ENGL 241 Shakespeare 

ENGL 251 Literary Themes 

ENGL 252 Literary Types 

ENGL 253 Non-Western Literature 

ENGL 254 Literature for Elementary Education Majors 

ENGL 255 East Asian Literature in Translation 

ENGL 261 Film Study: Introduction to the Art 

ENGL 262 Film Study: Literature and Film 

ENGL 324 Language in Context 

ENSL 101 English as a Second Language I 

ENSL 102 English as a Second Language II 

ENSL 151 Intermediate English as a Second Language 

HIST 1 1 1 Western Civilization to the Reformation 

HIST 1 1 2 Western Civilization since the Reformation 

HIST 131 World History to 1500 



36 



Undergraduate Academic Programs 



HIST 132 World History since 1500 

HIST 151 Asian Civilization 

HIST 161 History and Culture of Mexico 

HIST 221 United States History and Constitutions to 1865 

HIST 222 United States History and Constitutions since 1865 

INTD/WMST 240 Critical Perspectives in Women's and 

Gender Studies 
LAAR 101 Elementary Arabic I 
LAAR 102 Elementary Arabic II 
LACH 101 Elementary Chinese I 
LACH 102 Elementary Chinese II 
LACV 101 Elementary Cape Verdean Creole 
LAFR 101 Elementary French I 
LAFR 102 Elementary French II 
LAGE 101 Elementary German I 
LAGE 102 Elementary German II 
LAIT 101 Elementary Italian I 
LAIT 102 Elementary Italian II 
LAJA 101 Elementary Japanese I 
LAJA 102 Elementary Japanese II 
LAJA 151 Intermediate Japanese 
LANG 300 Languages of the World 
LANG 350 International Women's Cinema 
LAPO 101 Elementary Portuguese I 
LAPO 102 Elementary Portuguese II 
LAPO 151 Intermediate Portuguese 
LARU 101 Elementary Russian I 
LARU 102 Elementary Russian II 
LARU 151 Intermediate Russian 
LASP 101 Elementary Spanish I 
LASP 102 Elementary Spanish II 
LASP 151 Intermediate Spanish I 
LASP 200 Intermidate Spanish II 
LASP 230 Contemporary Latin America Short Story in 

Translation 

PHIL 203 Happiness and the Meaning of Life 

PHIL 205 Medical Ethics 

PHIL 207 Philosophy of Education 

PHIL 210 Liberation Ethics 

PHIL 212 Philosophies of India 

PHIL 213 Philosophies of China and Japan 

PHIL 215 Environmental Ethics 

PHIL 216 Values and Technology 

PHIL 222 Philosophy of Law 

PHIL 225 Philosophy of Art 

PHIL 228 Philosophy of Religion 

PHIL 229 Explaining the Paranormal 

PHIL 231 Amoralism, Egoism and Altruism 

PHIL 232 Philosophy of Feminist Thought 

PHIL 234 Free Will, Determinism and Responsibility 

PHIL 235 Human Rights and Human Liberties 

PHIL 242 Philosophy and Human Nature 

PHIL 248 Buddha, Socrates, Jesus 

PHIL 301 Plato and Aristotle 

PHIL 303 Major Modern Philosophers 

PHIL 305 American Philosophy 

PHIL 320 Topics in Philosophy 

PHIL 402 Knowledge and Truth 



PHIL 403 Ethics and Action 
PHIL 404 Mind and Language 
WMST/INTD 240 Critical Perspectives in Women's and 
Gender Studies 

Natural Sciences (CNSL; CNSN) 

Select two courses from below (one must be a laboratory science): 

Laboratory Sciences (CNSL): 

BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 
BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 
BIOL 117 The Biological Environment 
BIOL 121 General Biology I 
CHEM 131 Survey of Chemistry I 
CHEM 141 Chemical Principles I 
CHEM 142 Chemical Principles II 
EASC 100 Physical Geology 
EASC 101 Historical Geology 
GEOG 121 Physical Geography 
PHYS 100 Physics in the Natural World 
PHYS 107 Exploring the Universe 
PHYS 181 Elements of Physics I 
PHYS 182 Elements of Physics II 
PHYS 183 Aviation Physics 
PHYS 243 General Physics I 
PHYS 244 General Physics II 
Non-Laboratory Sciences (CNSL): 

BIOL 110 Biology: A Human Approach 
BIOL 115 Microbial World and You 
BIOL 119 The Botanical World 
BIOL 128 The Biology of Human Sexuality 
CHEM 102 Chemistry in Everyday Life 
CHEM 132 Survey in Chemistry II 
EASC 102 History of the Earth 
EASC 194 Environmental Geology 
EASC 101 Historical Geology 
GEOG 122 The Physical World 
GEOG 130 Environmental Geography 
PHYS 102 Modern Physics for the Humanist 
PHYS 180 Energy and its Social Uses 

Social and Behavioral Sciences (CSOC) 

Select two courses from below: 

ANTH 100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 

ANTH 101 Biological Anthropology 

ANTH 103 Introduction to Archaeology 

ANTH 110 Introduction to Folklore 

ANTH 111 Myth and Culture 

ANTH 1 1 5 Anthropology of Race, Class and Gender 

ANTH 120 First Nations: Global Indigenous People 

ANTH 130 Introduction to Primates 

ANTH 204 Global Human Issues 

ANTH 206 Native Cultures of North America 

ANTH 208 Anthropology of Women 

ANTH 209 Peoples and Cultures of Africa 

ANTH 213 Latin American Peoples and Cultures 

ANTH 215 The Caribbean 

ANTH 216 Peoples and Cultures of the Near East 

ANTH 224 Anthropology of South Asia 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



BSC 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE c ULLBGB 



Undergraduate Academic Programs 



ANTH 305 Culture Change 

ARTH 306 Urban Anthropology 

ANTH 307 Anthropology of Religion 

ANTH 308 Anthropology of Education 

ANTH 309 Anthropology of Art 

ANTH 314 Women in Myth and Lore 

ANTH 315 Ethnic Experience in America 

ANTH 319 Contemporary Native Americans 

ANTH 322 War, Peace and Culture 

ANTH 328 Archaeology of North America 

ANTH 330 Medical Anthropology 

ANTH 331 Political Anthropology 

ANTH 340 Myths and Peoples of the Ancient Near East 

ANTH 355 Anthropological Study Tour 

ANTH 399 Special Topics in Anthropology 

ANTH 404 Seminar: Culture and Consciousness 

ANTH 405 Forensic Anthropology 

ANTH 406 Seminar: Human Evolution 

ANTH 417 She/He: Two Spirits: Gender Cross-Culturally 

ANTH 420 Visual Anthropology 

ANTH 426 New England Ethnic and Regional Communities 

ANTH 435 Seminar: Global Feminism 

COMM 365 Introduction to Intercultural Communication 

ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics 

ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics 

GEOG 151 Human Geography 

GEOG 171 Geography of the Global South 

INTD 200 Introduction to Canadian Studies 

POLI 172 Introduction to American Government 

POLI 250 Research Methods in Political Science 

POLI 260 International Relations 

POLI 274 Western Political Thought: Plato to the Present 

POLI 275 Comparative Government 

POLI 277 American Government: State and Local 

POLI 279 Introduction to Public Administration 

POLI 285 Law and the Judicial Process 

PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 

PSYC 200 Non-Western Theories of Personality 

PSYC 230 Cross-Cultural Psychology 

SCWK 250 Introduction to Social Work 

SCWK 270 Social Work Issues of Diversity and Oppression 

SOCI 102 Introduction to Sociology 

SOCI 103 Social Problems 

SOCI 104 Global Social Problems 

SOCI 204 Gender, Sexuality and Society 

SOCI 211 Homeless in U.S. Society 

SOCI 214 Middle Eastern Societies 

SOCI 217 East Asian Societies: China and Japan 

SOCI 218 Chinese Society and Culture 

SOCI 219 Population and Society 

SOCI 220 The Developing World 

SOCI 338 Game Theory and the Law 

SOCI 360 Feminist Theory in Sociology 

SOCI 391 Seminar: Social Data Analysis 

Additional Distribution Requirements*** 

Core Skills courses may not satisfy these requirements, but 
courses listed in Core Distribution Requirement areas may also 
be listed here. 



Writing Intensive (CWRT) 

Select two courses from below. 

Note: First Year and writing intensive Second Year Seminars may also 
be used. 

ANTH 110 Introduction to Folklore 

ANTH 111 Myth and Culture 

ANTH 215 The Caribbean 

ANTH 305 Culture Change 

ANTH 307 Anthropology of Religion 

ANTH 330 Medical Anthropology 

ANTH 340 Myths and Peoples of the Ancient Near East 

ANTH 404 Seminar: Culture and Consciousness 

ANTH 426 New England Ethnic and Regional Communities 

ARTH 214 Global Art History Study Tour 

ENGL 211 Literary Classics of Western Civilization to 1600 

ENGL 214 The Classical Tradition 

ENGL 221 Major British Writers to 1800 

ENGL 222 Major British Writers since 1800 

ENGL 231 Major American Writers to 1865 

ENGL 232 Major American Writers since 1865 

ENGL 233 Introduction to the African-American Novel 

ENGL 241 Shakespeare 

ENGL 251 Literary Themes 

ENGL 252 Literary Types 

ENGL 253 Non-Western Literature 

ENGL 254 Literature for Elementary Education Majors 

ENGL 255 East Asian Literature in Translation 

ENGL 261 Film Study: Introduction to the Art 

ENGL 262 Film Study: Literature and Film 

***May be taken anytime 

HIST 161 History and Culture of Mexico 

INTD/WMST 240 Critical Perspectives in Women's and 

Gender Studies 
PHIL 212 Philosophies of India 
PHIL 213 Philosophies of China and Japan 
PHIL 222 Philosophy of Law 
PHIL 225 Philosophy of Art 
PHIL 228 Philosophy of Religion 
PHIL 231 Amoralism, Egoism and Altruism 
PHIL 234 Free Will, Determinism and Responsibility 
PHIL 248 Buddha, Socrates, Jesus 
PHIL 301 Plato and Aristotle 
PHIL 303 Major Modern Philosophers 
PHIL 305 American Philosophy 
PHIL 320 Topics in Philosophy 
PHIL 402 Knowledge and Truth 
PHIL 403 Ethics and Action 
PHIL 404 Mind and Language 
POLI 274 Western Political Thought: Plato to the Present 
POLI 285 Law and the Judicial Process 
PSYC 212 Research Methods II 
SOCI 204 Gender, Sexuality and Society 
SOCI 211 Homeless in U.S. Society 
SOCI 219 Population and Society 
SOCI 360 Feminist Theory in Sociology 



38 



Undergraduate Academic Programs 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



THEA 236 The American Musical Theater 
WMST/INTD 240 Critical Perspectives in Women's and 
Gender Studies 

Speaking Intensive (CSPI) or Additional Writing 
Intensive (CWRT) 

Select one Speaking Intersive course (CSPI): 
ANTH 216 Peoples and Cultures of the Near East 
ARTH 208 Survey of Islamic Art and Architecture 
ARTH 211 Monuments as Cultural Symbols and Emblems 

of Power 
ARTH 218 History of Photography 
ARTH 311 Orientalism 

or 

an additional Writing Intensive Course (CWRT) 
Note: first and second year seminars may be used. 

Writing Intensive in the Major (CWRM) 

Select one course for each major as described in the major(s) 
requirements listed in the appropriate academic department 

section of this catalog. 

Global Culture (CGCL) 

Select two courses from below. 

ANTH 100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 

ANTH 110 Introduction to Folklore 

ANTH 111 Myth and Culture 

ANTH 120 First Nations: Global Indigenous People 

ANTH 204 Global Human Issues 

ANTH 206 Native Cultures of North America 

ANTH 208 Anthropology of Women 

ANTH 209 Peoples and Cultures of Africa 

ANTH 213 Latin American Peoples and Cultures 

ANTH 215 The Caribbean 

ANTH 216 Peoples and Cultures of the Near East 

ANTH 224 Anthropology of South Asia 

ANTH 305 Culture Change 

ANTH 307 Anthropology of Religion 

ANTH 308 Anthropology of Education 

ANTH 309 Anthropology of Art 

ANTH 314 Women in Myth and Lore 

ANTH 319 Contemporary Native Americans 

ANTH 322 War, Peace and Culture 

ANTH 328 Archaeology of North America 

ANTH 330 Medical Anthropology 

ANTH 331 Political Anthropology 

ANTH 340 Myths and Peoples of the Ancient Near East 

ANTH 404 Seminar: Culture and Consciousness 

ANTH 417 She/He: Two Spirits: Gender Cross-Culturally 

ANTH 435 Seminar: Global Feminism 

ARTH 101 Introduction to Art 

ARTH 102 Introduction to Architecture 

ARTH 103 Survey of Ancient and Medieval Art 

ARTH 104 Survey of Art from the 14 th Century to the Present 

ARTH 205 Asian Art Survey: India, China and Japan 

ARTH 207 Introduction to African Art 

ARTH 208 Survey of Islamic Art and Architecture 

ARTH 214 Global Art History Study Tour 



ARTH 218 History of Photography 

ARTH 219 Mesoamerican Art and Architecture 

ARTH 311 Orientalism 

COMM 462 Patterns of International Communication 

ENGL 211 Literary Classics of Western Civilization to 1600 

ENGL 214 The Classical Tradition 

ENGL 253 Non-Western Literature 

ENGL 255 East Asian Literature in Translation 

ENSL 101 English as a Second Language I 

ENSL 102 English as a Second Language II 

ENSL 151 Intermediate English as a Second Language 

GEOG 151 Human Geography 

GEOG 171 Geography of the Global South 

HIST 111 Western Civilization to the Reformation 

HIST 112 Western Civilization since the Reformation 

HIST 131 World History to 1500 

HIST 132 World History since 1500 

HIST 151 Asian Civilization 

HIST 161 History and Culture of Mexico 

INTD 200 Introduction to Canadian Studies 

LAAR 101 Elementary Arabic I 

LAAR 102 Elementary Arabic II 

LACH 101 Elementary-Chinese I 

LACH 102 Elementary Chinese II 

LACV 101 Elementary Cape Verdean Creole 

LAFR 101 Elementary French I 

LAFR 102 Elementary French II 

LAGE 101 Elementary German I 

LAGE 102 Elementary German II 

LAIT 101 Elementary Italian I 

LAIT 102 Elementary Italian II 

LAJA 101 Elementary Japanese I 

LAJA 102 Elementary Japanese II 

LAJA 151 Intermediate Japanese 

LANG 300 Languages of the World 

LAPO 101 Elementary Portuguese I 

LAPO 102 Elementary Portuguese II 

LAPO 151 Intermediate Portuguese 

LARU 101 Elementary Russian I 

LARU 102 Elementary Russian II 

LARU 151 Intermediate Russian 

LASP 101 Elementary Spanish I 

LASP 102 Elementary Spanish II 

LASP 151 Intermediate Spanish 

LASP 200 Intermediate Spanish II 

LASP 230 Contemporary Latin American Short Story 

in Translation 
MUSC 162 Music in African Culture 
MUSC 163 Music in the Non-Western World 
PHED/THEA 260 World Dance 
PHIL 212 Pholosophies of India 
PHIL 213 Philosophies of China and Japan 
PHIL 248 Buddha, Socrates, Jesus 
PHIL 301 Plato and Aristotle 
PHIL 303 Major Modern Philosophers 
POLI 275 Comparative Government 
PSYC 200 Non-Western Theories of Personality 
PSYC 230 Cross-Cultural Psychology 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



BSC 



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STATE < 


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Undergraduate Academic Programs 



SOC1 104 Global Social Problems 

SOCI 214 Middle Eastern Societies 

SOCI 217 East Asian Societies. China and Japan 

SOCI 218 Chinese Society and Culture 

SOCI 220 The Developing World 

THEA 222 Asian Theater 

THEA/PHED 260 World Dance 

Multiculturalism (CMCL) 

Select one course from below. 

ANTH 100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 

ANTH 115 Anthropology of Race. Class and Gender 

ANTH 204 Global Human Issues 

ANTH 206 Native Cultures of North America 

ANTH 208 Anthropology of Women 

ANTH 209 Peoples and Cultures of Africa 

ANTH 213 Latin American Peoples and Cultures 

ANTH 215 The Caribbean 

ANTH 216 Peoples and Cultures of the Near East 

ANTH 306 Urban Anthropology 

ANTH 308 Anthropology of Education 

ANTH 315 Ethnic Experience in America 

ANTH 319 Contemporary Native Americans 

ANTH 322 War, Peace and Culture 

ANTH 330 Medical Anthropology 

ANTH 331 Political Anthropology 

ANTH 417 She/He: Two Spirits: Gender Cross-Culturally 

ANTH 420 Visual Anthropology 

ANTH 426 Seminar: New England Ethnic and Regional 

Communities 
ANTH 435 Seminar: Global Feminism 
ARTH 203 American Art and Architecture 
ARTH 205 Asian Art: India, China and Japan 
ARTH 207 Introduction to African Art 
ARTH 208 Survey of Islamic Art and Architecture 
ARTH 211 Monuments as Cultural Symbols and Emblems 

of Power 

ARTH 214 Global Art History Study Tour 
ARTH 217 African-American Art 
ARTH 218 History of Photography 
ARTH 220 United States Art Study Tour 
ARTH 308 Women in the Visual Arts 
ARTH 311 Orientalism 

COMM 365 Introduction to Intercultural Communication 

ENGL 233 Introduction to the African-American Novel 

ENGL 255 East Asian Literature in Translation 

ENGL 324 Language in Context 

GEOG 151 Human Geography 

GEOG 171 Geography of the Global South 

HIST 111 Western Civilization to the Reformation 

HIST 112 Western Civilization since the Reformation 

HIST 131 World History to 1500 

HIST 132 World History since 1500 

HIST 151 Asian Civilization 

HIST 161 History and Culture of Mexico 



INDT/WMST 240 Critical Perspectives in Women's and 

Gender Studies 
LANG 350 International Women's Cinema 
LASP 230 Contemporary Latin American Short Story 

in Translation 
MUSC 166 Survey of American Jazz 
PHIL 210 Liberation Ethics 
PHIL 212 Philosophies of India 
PHIL 232 Philosophy and Feminist Thought 
POLI 275 Comparative Government 
PSYC 200 Non-Western Theories of Personality 
PSYC 230 Cross-Cultural Psychology 
SCWK 270 Social Work Issues of Diversity and Oppression 
SOCI 102 Introduction to Sociology 
SOCI 103 Social Problems 
SOCI 104 Global Social Problems 
SOCI 204 Gender, Sexuality and Society 
SOCI 214 Middle Eastern Societies 
SOCI 217 East Asian Societies: China and Japan 
SOCI 220 The Developing World 
SOCI 360 Feminist Theory in Sociology 
SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in Society and Schools 
THEA 222 Asian Theater 

WMST/INTD 240 Critical Perspectives in Women's and 
Gender Studies 

Application of Quantitative Skills (CQUR) 

Select one course from below, or a second Mathematical 
Reasoning course may be taken (CMAR): 

AFCI 100 Fundamentals of Financial Reporting 

ACFI 150 Personal Finance 

AFCI 200 Financial Accounting 

ACFI 240 Principles of Accounting I 

ACFI 241 Principles of Accounting II 

ACFI 340 Intermediate Accounting I 

ACFI 341 Intermediate Accounting II 

ACFI 350 Managerial Accounting 

ACFI 385 Managerial Finance 

BIOL 297 Biometry 

CHEM 141 Chemical Principles I 

CHEM 142 Chemical Principles II 

ECON 210 Statistics for Economics and Business 

PHYS 100 Physics in the Natural World 

PHYS 102 Modern Physics for the Humanist 

PHYS 107 Exploring the Universe 

PHYS 180 Energy and its Social Uses 

PHYS 181 Elements of Physics I 

PHYS 182 Elements of Physics II 

PHYS 183 Aviation Physics 

PHYS 243 General Physics I 

PHYS 244 General Physics II 

POLI 250 Research Methods in Political Science 

PSYC 211 Research Methods I 

PSYC 212 Research Methods II 

SOCI 338 Game Theory and the Law 

SOCI 391 Seminar: Social Data Analysis 



Undergraduate Academic Programs 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



United States and Massachusetts Constitutions (CUSC) 

Select one course from below: 
ACFI 305 Business Law I 

HIST 221 United States History and Constitutions to 1865 
HIST 222 United States History and Constitutions since 1865 
POL1 172 Introduction to American Government 
POLI 277 American Government: State and Local 
POLI 279 Introduction to Public Administration 
POLI 285 Law and the Judicial Process 

Seminars 

Each seminar may also fulfill a Core Distribution Requirement 
and an Additional Distribution Requirement. 

XXXX 199 First Year Seminar (CFYS) 
XXXX 298 Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive) 
(CSYS) 

or 

XXXX 299 Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive) 
(CSYS) 

Bridgewater State College considers any student with fewer than 
24 credit hours to be a 1 st year student and any student with 24- 
53 earned credit hours to be a 2 nd year student. 

Please note: 

• Only certain BSC courses have been approved for use in the 
core curriculum. Please see www.bridgew.edu/corecurricu- 
lum for a complete list of approved courses and for the most 
up-to-date information regarding the core curriculum. 

• Students who entered BSC in the fall of 2006 or later as first 
time students to BSC MUST follow the new core curriculum. 

• Students who matriculated at BSC prior to fall 2006 may 
petition to follow an earlier catalog. 

• Students who transfer more than 23 credits to BSC will have 
the CFYS (First Year Seminar) waived. Students who trans- 
fer more than 53 credits will have the CSYS (Second Year 
Seminar) waived. However, transfer students will still need to 
fulfill the Writing Intensive and Speaking Intensive require- 
ments. 

• Appeals will be heard by the associate dean of Arts and 
Sciences. 

• Transfer students who believe that they have met the out- 
comes for a BSC Core Curriculum Requirement by taking a 
course at another college should submit a Core Curriculum 
Substitution form to the Office of the Dean of Arts and 
Sciences. 

DIRECTED STUDY 

The college permits students to pursue their interests through 
directed study. Such an undertaking involves independent 
thinking, hard work and creativity along with the guidance 
and help of a faculty member. The end result should be a paper 
or project accepted by the faculty member working with the 
student. Directed Study, which is limited to three credits with a 
maximum of six credits for graduation purposes and is primarily 
for upperclassmen, is available for the pursuit of independent 



work. Application forms for directed study are available from 
the student's major department and should be submitted to the 
department chairperson for his/her recommendation and then 
forwarded to the appropriate school dean for approval. 

INTERNSHIP, PRACTICUM AND FIELD 
EXPERIENCE 

A number of departments within the college offer students the 
opportunity to enroll in an internship, practicum or field experi- 
ence for academic credit. Such experiences provide students, 
usually in their third or fourth year, the chance to undertake a 
supervised practical experience in their field of study. Normally, 
field experience opportunities are available only during the fall 
and spring semesters. 

Students interested in such a field experience have the option 
of consulting with their faculty adviser for details on programs 
available through the department or developing their own pro- 
gram proposals, subject to the approval of the department. If 
the field experience desired is proposed by the student, it is the 
student's responsibility to locate a faculty member who will pro- 
vide the necessary supervision. 

Application and Selection 

Application forms for a field experience are available from the 
student's department. The completed form must be filed with the 
chairperson of the department in which the field experience is 
to be undertaken no later than the end of the first quarter of the 
semester prior to the semester in which the field experience is to 
be undertaken. 

The department will screen all applications in order to select 
students best suited for the positions available. The chairperson 
will forward the application forms to the dean of the appropriate 
school for approval. The completed form must be received by the 
Registrar's Office prior to the end of the drop/add period to enroll 
the student. 

Applicants to internships must have completed at least 54 
credits with a minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA. Departments may 
set higher standards. 

Supervision and Grading 

Supervision, evaluation and grading of a field experience are the 
responsibilities of faculty members in the department offering 
the program. A student may be removed from the program if, in 
the judgement of the faculty supervisor, it is in the best interests 
of the student, agency and/or college. Grades are based on 
written evaluations from both the faculty supervisor and the 
agency supervisor. 

From 3 to 1 5 credits in field experience may be earned and 
applied toward graduation requirements. The number of credits 
that may apply toward the major will be determined by each 
department. A minimum of 45 clock hours in the field is required 
for each credit hour granted. 

Compensation 

Normally, students may not be compensated except for minimal 
amounts to cover such expenses as travel. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at vvww.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Undergraduate Academic Programs 



H 



HONORS PROGRAM 

The Honors Program at Bridgewater State College encourages 
gifted and highly motivated students to reach their highest 
potential through critical thinking, scholarship and research. 
Small classes and close student-faculty relations provide for the 
vigorous and thorough exchange of ideas, while the program as 
a whole attempts to create an atmosphere fostering intellectual, 
artistic and academic achievement. 

The program does not require students to complete additional 
course work beyond the 1 20 credit hours necessary for gradua- 
tion; instead, students earn honors credits, as described below, 
by taking honors sections of regular courses and/or honors dur- 
ing their freshman and sophomore years, by completing honors 
work in certain 300- and 400-level courses during their junior 
and senior years, and by researching and writing an honors thesis 
in their senior year. 

Honors students are required to meet with either of the direc- 
tors once a semester to discuss their work in the program. 

For all honors work completed with a grade of B (3.0) or high- 
er, students receive honors credit on their transcripts, and those 
who complete the program receive an honors degree - a goal 
worth serious effort both for the intrinsic satisfaction it brings 
and the advantage it provides at a time of strong competition for 
graduate and career opportunities. 

COMMONWEALTH HONORS 

Students can participate in the Honors Program in two ways: 
by undertaking all of the requirements listed below for 
Commonwealth Honors or by undertaking the requirements listed 
only under "Junior and Senior Years" for Departmental Honors. 
Commonwealth Honors runs throughout a student's undergradu- 
ate career, whereas Departmental Honors takes place only in 
the student's last two years. Commonwealth Honors includes 
the requirements for Departmental Honors; a student might 
undertake only Departmental Honors if he or she transferred to 
Bridgewater State College or developed an interest in pursuing 
honors work after the freshman year. 

Freshman and Sophomore Years 
(for Commonwealth Honors) 

Students seeking Commonwealth Honors must accumulate a total 
of 1 2 credits of honors level work at the 100-200 level preferably, 
but not necessarily, during their first two years Honors credit at 
this level can be earned in two ways: by taking four three-credit 
honors courses or by taking a mix of three-credit honors courses 
and one-credit honors colloquia totaling 1 2 credits. Both honors 
courses and colloquia are listed in the Course Schedule issued 
shortly before registration. 

Honors courses: Honors courses are specially-designed 
sections of regular 100-200 level courses. Most fulfill Core 
Curriculum credit and thereby impose no additional requirements 
for graduation. These courses offer small class size (capped at 
1 5 students), more active discussion, greater student and faculty 
interaction, more challenging material, and often an emphasis on 
writing and oral presentation. Honors courses have recently been 
offered in art, biology, chemistry, English, history, mathematics, 
philosophy, political science and psychology. 



Honors colloquia: Honors colloquia carry one academic credit, 
meet once a week for 50 minutes, and culminate in a paper 
or scientific project that provides the major part of the grade. 
Minimum enrollment in each colloquium is two and the maxi- 
mum is 1 2. Although most colloquia stand on their own, some 
are attached to regularly offered courses that form part of the 
student's normal program. Colloquia do not carry core curriculum 
credit, but offer intense study in a wide range of topics not 
usually found at this level. 

Whether in honors classes or colloquia, students are expected 
to maintain a cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA) of 3.3. 
Students whose GPA falls between 3.3 and 2.7 may remain 
in the program for a further semester after which they will be 
dropped if the deficiency is not corrected; students whose GPA 
falls below 2.7 will be dropped from the program at that time. In 
either case, whenever the GPA returns to 3.3, students may re- 
enter the program. Although the honors directors have discretion 
to retain students in the program who do not meet these require- 
ments, by the time of graduation students must have attained a 
cumulative GPA of 3.3. 

Junior and Senior Years 

Students who have completed the 1 2 credits of honors work 
described above and who have attained a cumulative GPA of 
at least 3.3 are eligible to continue by entering a Departmental 
Honors program or, if the student's major does not offer 
Departmental Honors, by undertaking, through the Honors 
Center, an individually designed interdisciplinary honors program 
(both of which require an application, either to the Departmental 
Honors Committee or the Honors Center). 

The following departments offer Departmental Honors: 

Accounting and Finance Movement Arts, Health 

Art Promotion and Leisure 

Aviation Science Studies 

Biology Philosophy 

Chemistry Physics 

Communication Studies Political Science 

Criminal Justice Psychology 

English Social Work 

Foreign Languages Sociology 

History Theater and Dance 

Management 

Mathematics and 
Computer Science 

Honors work at this level emphasizes independent study and 
research in the major, or combination of majors if interdisciplin- 
ary. Students are required to take nine credits of honors work at 
the 300-400 level and can do so by combining Honors Contracts 
and the Honors Thesis. With an Honors Contract, the student 
and instructor devise an advanced project within the course that 
emphasizes independent research on a particular subject. The 
student then completes a special advanced project, under the 
instructor's direction, in conjunction with the course. 

The honors courses or colloquia are advanced 300- and 400- 
level course work that typically replace honors contracts and are 
designed to prepare students for upper-level research within 
their field. Students should check with their departments for 
more information about specific requirements. 



Undergraduate Academic Programs 



BSC 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



As a senior, the student researches and writes an honors the- 
sis (earning 3 credits for "XXXX485 Honors Thesis") under the 
direction of a faculty member on a one-on-one basis; this can be 
done for either one or two semesters. (We encourage two semes- 
ters, but students should discuss this with their Departmental 
Honors Committee and thesis adviser. Note that some depart- 
ments require a two-semester thesis). Whether the thesis qualifies 
the student to graduate with honors will be determined by the 
departmental honors committee or, where appropriate, by the stu- 
dent's interdisciplinary honors committee. For many students the 
honors thesis is the intellectual high point of the undergraduate 
experience -fascinating and exciting in its own right, and valuable 
as a preparation for graduate school or professional employment. 

Credit requirements for Commonwealth Honors may be sum- 
marized as follows: 

• At least 12 honors credits at the 100 or 200 level in three- 
credit honors classes and one-credit honors colloquia 

• Nine credit hours in honors course work at the 300 or 400 
level obtained by undertaking the requirements specified by 
the academic department, which may include honors con- 
tracts or honors courses or colloquia, and either one or two 
semesters of an honors thesis. Forms for honors contracts 
and the honors thesis can be downloaded from the Honors 
Program Web site, www.bridgew.edu/honorsprograms or 
they may be picked up from the Honors Center. They should 
be filled out, signed and returned to the Honors Center dur- 
ing the first two weeks of the semester. 

• A public presentation of the thesis work at a campus forum, 
such as an event sponsored by the student's deparment or 
the Undergraduate Research Symposium held each April. 

Students who complete the program will have the phrase 
"with Commonwealth Honors" entered on their transcripts. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS 

Students wishing to undertake only upper-division honors work 
can apply to their major department to do departmental honors 
around the end of the sophomore or beginning of the junior year, 
and should complete those requirements listed under "Junior 
and Senior Years." For specific requirements and expectations, 
please consult your departmental honors committee or request 
information at the Honors Center. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Bridgewater State College offers a variety of academic schol- 
arships ranging from presidential andTsorigas scholarships, 
administered by the Off ice of Admissions, to the more special- 
ized scholarships described on the Student Affairs Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/student affairs. Of particular interest to 
students in the Honors Program is the Adrian Tinsley Program for 
Undergraduate Research, which offers generous financial sup- 
port for students' research. Full details are available at 
www.bridgew.edu/atp. 



HONORS CENTER 

Students in the program have access throughout the year to 
the Honors Center in the Academic Achievement Center on the 
ground floor of Maxwell Library. Designed as a study area and 
meeting place for students in the honors program, the center has 
large work tables, comfortable chairs, computers, a color laser 
printer and a refrigerator. Students will also find copies of past 
honors theses written by BSC honors students, and announce- 
ments of national and regional undergraduate research confer- 
ences in which honors students are encouraged to participate. 
The center is open from 9 am to 5 pm on Monday through Friday 
during the academic year. 

HONORS EVENTS 

Twice a year the program hosts a dinner for students and faculty 
featuring an informal talk by a faculty recipient of the Honors 
Outstanding Faculty Award. The honors program also hosts other 
events such as the Fall Book Club, the Thesis Workshop and the One 
Book, One Community Program where BSC honors students and high 
school students gather together with faculty facilitators to discuss the 
same book. 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Several departments invite academically talented students to join 
nationally recognized honor societies. For information on the fol- 
lowing, contact the department chairperson. 

Alpha Mu Alpha (Marketing) 

Eta Sigma Gamma, Delta Pi Chapter (Health) 

Kappa Delta Pi (Education) 

Lambda Pi Eta (Communication Studies) 

Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics) 

Phi Alpha, Beta Chi Chapter (Social Work) 

Phi Alpha Theta (History) 

Pi Kappa Delta (Forensics) 

Pi Mu Epsilon (Mathematics) 

Pi Sigma Alpha, Pi Upsilon Chapter (Political Science) 

Psi Chi (Psychology) 

Sigma Gamma Epsilon, Zeta lota Chapter (Earth Science and 
Geography) 

INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS 

The college offers a number of interdisciplinary programs, provid- 
ing majors, minors and preprofessional programs. See the section 
on "Interdisciplinary and Preprofessional Programs." 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



43 



Undergraduate Academic Policies 



BSC 



state OOUBBB 



ACADEMIC INTEGRITY 

Institutions of higher education are dedicated to the pursuit of 
truth. In this pursuit, academic honesty is of fundamental impor- 
tance. Faculty, students and administrators all have a responsibil- 
ity to value, demonstrate and safeguard academic integrity as 
one of the college's most essential institutional values. 

The college has an obligation to establish and promote stan- 
dards of academic integrity, and each member of the college 
community has the responsibility to understand, support and 
practice them. When standards of academic integrity are fol- 
lowed, teaching and learning can proceed in an environment of 
trust. When such standards are violated, teaching and learning 
are in doubt. Therefore, the best interests of the college com- 
munity require that cases of alleged academic dishonesty be 
addressed seriously but equitably. 

At Bridgewater State College, academic honesty is expected 
of all students; plagiarism and cheating are not condoned and 
are subject to academic penalty, which may result in a failure 
for the course in which the violation took place. A violation 
may result in a reduced grade, suspension or dismissal from 
the college. 

Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to, pla- 
giarism, cheating and dishonest practices. The procedure for 
implementing an academic penalty for academic misconduct is 
as follows: 

• The instructor shall notify the student of the alleged viola- 
tion, and they shall discuss the matter usually within seven 
days of the notice of the alleged infraction. The instructor 
and/or the student may request that the department chair, 
or other party from the college, be present at this meeting. 
The instructor shall notify the department chair and the 
associate vice president for academic affairs of the nature of 
the alleged violation, the outcome of the meeting held with 
the student, and the penalty, which may include a reduced 
grade on an assignment or in the course, including failure. 
The instructor reports the case to the academic review panel, 
and may refer the case for review. The instructor shall inform 
the student that further action may be taken by the associate 
vice president for academic affairs, in cases of repeat offens- 
es. The associate vice president for academic affairs will refer 
cases of repeat offenses to the academic review panel. 



If the matter is not resolved, the student or instructor may 
request a hearing within five school days before the academ- 
ic review panel, and the student and instructor, each with a 
representative serving in an advisory capacity, should either 
choose to have one, shall meet with the panel to discuss 
the alleged violation of college policy. The academic review 
panel shall conduct its investigations, usually within 15 days 
following notification, and shall follow the requirements 
of due process. Based upon the allegations or evidence 
received, the panel may recommend further sanctions, or 
no change in sanctions, or a reduction in sanctions, and will 
take into account any previous infractions only after it con- 
cludes its investigation of the present case. Further sanctions 
may include suspension or expulsion. 

Requests by students for hearings by the academic review 
panel will be considered on the basis of inappropriate sanc- 
tions, violation of due process, procedural error that negatively 
impacted the outcome, or new evidence that was not reasonably 
available at the time of the meeting with the instructor. 

The academic review panel will consist of three faculty mem- 
bers and two student members of the academic policies commit- 
tee, appointed annually by the chairperson of that committee; 
three members must be present, including at least two faculty 
members, to constitute a quorum. In addition, the associate vice 
president for academic affairs will serve in a nonvoting capacity 
as adviser to the panel and will maintain a record of reported 
violations by students. Multiple offenses by a student may have 
a bearing on the sanctions imposed by the panel. All evidence 
before the academic review panel is confidential. 

Any decision of the academic review panel shall be forwarded 
in writing to the associate vice president for academic affairs, 
who shall inform both the student and the instructor of the deci- 
sion in writing by hand delivery or by return-receipt-requested, 
addressee-only mail. 

An appeal by either party shall be made to the vice president 
for academic affairs. 



CLASSROOM CONDUCT POLICY 

Because all students and faculty at Bridgewater State College 
are entitled to a positive and constructive teaching and learning 
environment, Bridgewater State College students are prohibited 
from engaging in behavior or activity that causes the disruption 
of teaching, learning, research or other academic activities neces- 
sary for the fulfillment of the college mission. 

If disruptive behavior occurs, whether in the classroom or 
another academic environment, a faculty member has the right 
to remove the student from the classroom setting. Examples of 
potentially disruptive behavior may include, but are not limited 
to, using derogatory, vulgar and insulting language directed at 
an individual or group, unsolicited talking in class, sleeping in 
class, using or activating cell phones, arriving at or leaving the 
classroom while class is in session, and/or failing to comply with 
the legitimate request of a college faculty member. 

If a student exhibits disruptive behavior, the faculty member 
may ask the student to stop the behavior. If the student does not 
comply with the professor's request, he or she will be asked to 



ACADEMIC INTEGRITY AND 
CLASSROOM CONDUCT 

Students are admitted to Bridgewater State College with the 
expectation that they will accept and abide by the standards of 
conduct and scholarship established by the faculty, administra- 
tion and student governing boards. The college reserves the right 
to require students to withdraw who do not maintain acceptable 
academic standing. The college also reserves the right to dismiss, 
with due process, students who do not meet the requirements 
of conduct and order or whose behavior is inconsistent with the 
standards of the college. The Bridgewater State College Student 
Handbook outlines campus policies and may be viewed at 
www.bndgew.edu/handbook/index.htm. 



44 



Undergraduate Academic Policies 



leave and the professor will indicate the expected appropriate 
conduct to be able to return to class. If the student agrees to the 
faculty member's instructions and returns to class but subse- 
quently continues to engage in disruptive behavior during future 
class sessions, the faculty member will forward written documen- 
tation of the student's behavior to the respective department 
chairperson, who will meet with the student to review the matter 
and determine an appropriate course of action. While the courses 
of action will vary, they may include referral to advising or coun- 
seling, reduction in grade, or withdrawal from the course. 

If the student does not comply with the course of action and 
continues to engage in disruptive behavior, the student may be 
withdrawn from the course after a review conducted by the asso- 
ciate vice president for academic affairs. This action may have 
implications for the student's full-time status, financial aid, health 
insurance and resident status. 

Students who exhibit behavior that immediately endangers or 
seriously disrupts the establishment or maintenance of an appro- 
priate learning environment in the classroom are subject to an 
immediate review by the associate vice president for academic 
affairs. If, at any time, faculty or students feel threatened, they 
should call Campus Police at 1 2 1 2. 

In all cases involving an individual with a disability, including 
mental disabilities, this policy will operate to make determina- 
tions based upon an individual's behavior rather than upon the 
individual's status of having a disability. Students have a personal 
obligation to obtain medical care for conditions that may affect 
their conduct, and to take any related medications as prescribed 
by their physicians. Under applicable disability laws, students 
with disabilities are responsible for their disruptive conduct. 

The vice president for academic affairs will act as the sole and 
final appeal for any decisions made by the associate vice presi- 
dent for academic affairs. 

The student may also be subject to disciplinary action under 
the Student Code of Conduct. 



ACADEMIC STANDARDS 

In order for a degree-seeking or non-degree student to avoid 
separation from Bridgewater State College, his/her cumulative 
Grade Point Average (GPA) must remain above the probation 
level as indicated below: 



Earned 


Academic 


Probation 


Separation 


Credit Hours 


Warning 


GPA 


Below This GPA 


0-16 


2.0-2.19 


Below 2.0 


1.00 


17-31 


2.0-2.19 


Below 2.0 


1.50 


32-46 


2.0-2.19 


Below 2.0 


1.65 


47-61 


2.0-2.19 


Below 2.0 


1.75 


62-89 


2.0-2.19 


Below 2.0 


1.85 


90 and above 


must maintain 




2.00 




2.00 or better 







In order for a first semester transfer student to avoid separa- 
tion from the college, his/her cumulative GPA must remain at 1 .5 
or above. After the first semester, a transfer student follows the 
table above. 



ACADEMIC PROBATION 

Students on academic probation are limited to 13 semester hours 
during the semester they are on probation. In addition, academic 
probation may involve 1) an adjustment in the student's academ- 
ic load, 2) frequent interviews between the student and adviser 
for the analysis of difficulties and for checking the student's prog- 
ress, 3) a stipulation that certain courses be taken to improve the 
student's academic performance, 4) restrictions on the student's 
extracurricular activities, and 5) other such precautions as are 
deemed advisable. 



ACADEMIC SEPARATION 

Students who have been academically separated from the col- 
lege may not take courses at the college (day or evening) for at 
least one academic semester. After this time period, students 
may apply for readmission through the Office of Admission. 
Although not required, it is recommended that readmission 
applicants give evidence of at least one semester of academic 
work with a 2.5 GPA or better at some other institution of higher 
learning. Students who have previously completed courses at 
a college are reminded that a total of not more than 69 credit 
hours may be transferred from two-year institutions. However, 
course work taken elsewhere will not necessarily be accepted as 
transfer credit. An undergraduate degree-seeking student who 
is academically dismissed twice can only apply for readmission 
after a three-year period. If readmitted, the student is placed on 
academic probation and must achieve a minimum GPA of 2.0 in 
order to continue. 

The grade point average of the student will be resumed after 
readmission. Students who have left the college for a minimum 
of three years may be given special consideration upon written 
appeal to the vice president for academic affairs. 

Note: Academic readmission or reinstatement to the college 
does not guarantee renewed financial aid eligibility. The student 
must contact the Financial Aid Office to be considered for 
financial aid. 



SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS 

In addition to being in good academic standing (please see the 
preceding section), a student is defined as making satisfactory 
academic progress when the academic record shows successful 
completion of a specified number of credits per semester. Full- 
time students must earn a minimum of 1 semester credits each 
semester to achieve satisfactory academic progress. 

Students should note that many financial assistance programs 
require participants to make satisfactory academic progress in 
order to remain eligible. The definition of satisfactory progress 
differs from that stated in the policy above. 

See the " Financial Aid " section of this catalog for further 
information concerning satisfactory academic progress for finan- 
cial aid purposes. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



bSc 



BRIDGE WATER 

STATfc ooun 



Undergraduate Academic Policies 



AWARDING OF UNDERGRADUATE 
DEGREES 



COMMENCEMENT CEREMONY 

The college conducts two commencement ceremonies annually, 
in winter and in spring. Students who complete requirements 
in August or December will be invited to participate in the 
winter ceremony. 



DEGREE APPLICATION 

Students who believe they are ready to receive their degree from 
Bridgewater State College are required to complete a formal 
degree application. These applications are available in the 
Registrar's Office. Each student is responsible for meeting all 
degree requirements and for ensuring that the Registrar's Office 
has received all credentials. 

Recommended graduation application deadlines are 
listed below: 

August 1 : for winter/January graduation 
December 20: for spring/May graduation 
April 15: for summer/August graduation 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Curricula leading to baccalaureate degrees are so planned that a 
student carrying 1 5 credit hours each semester will ordinarily be 
able to complete the requirements for graduation in four years 
or eight semesters. Degrees will be awarded to candidates who 
have fulfilled the following: 

• A MINIMUM of 120 credits, distributed according to the core 
curriculum requirements, the requirements of the declared 
major and any free electives. Satisfactory completion of all 
requirements for a bachelor's degree must be under a cata- 
log in effect within eight years of the date of graduation. The 
catalog used, however, may be no earlier than the catalog in 
effect at the time of matriculation or, in the case of a change 
of major, concentration or minor, no earlier than the catalog 
in effect when the major, concentration or minor was 
formally declared. 

Note: This policy does not apply to students enrolled in pro- 
grams governed by state and/or federal regulations where 
current academic requirements may need to be met. Students 
should check with their departments where applicable. 

• A MINIMUM of 30 credit hours completed through 
Bridgewater State College, as a degree-seeking student, 
including at least one half of the required courses in the 
major and any minor field (excluding cognate requirements). 
Note: Of the 90 credits that may be accepted in transfer by 
Bridgewater State College and applied to the baccalaureate 
degree, only 69 credits will be accepted from two-year 
institutions. 

• A MINIMUM of 15 credit hours of the final 30 credit hours of 
a student's degree program completed through Bridgewater 
State College. 



Note: Any course taken at another accredited institution 
after admission to Bridgewater State College must have 
departmental preapproval. A student must complete an 
Approval Form for the Transfer of Undergraduate Credits 
After Admission for each course in advance. 

• A MINIMUM cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 (or 
higher if required by the major at Bridgewater State College) 
and any other academic requirements of the student's major 
department as approved by college governance procedures; 

• A MINIMUM cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or 
higher in the student's major(s) and minor(s) requirements 
taken through Bridgewater State College. The major GPA 
includes all courses completed in the major field (excluding 
cognate requirements). The minor GPA includes all courses 
required for completion of the minor, regardless of the 
department in which the courses are offered. 

a) The credit earned in an introductory college skills course 
may not be used to satisfy Core Curriculum Requirements 
nor may it be applied toward the minimum number of cred- 
its required for graduation in any major. 

b) Students will not be allowed to receive their diplomas or 
transcripts until all financial debts to the college have 
been paid. 

Conferral of a degree occurs when the registrar finalizes the 
student's academic record and confirms that all requirements 
have been satisfied. Participation in the commencement ceremo- 
ny does not constitute conferral of the degree. Similarly, inclusion 
of a student's name in such publications as the commencement 
program does not confirm eligibility for the degree. 

Graduation Requirements - Second Degree Program 

Upon admission to a second undergraduate degree program 
(see the "Undergraduate Admission " section of this catalog), the 
student will meet with an adviser from the major department to 
plan a course of study based on the current requirements of that 
major. That course of study must be approved by the chair of the 
department and forwarded to the assistant registrar. Any changes 
in that course of study must also have the approval of the adviser 
and the chair and be forwarded to the assistant registrar. If a 
student does not complete the course of study within four years 
of admission, the department may require the student to change 
the course of study to reflect changes in major requirements. 
(Note: This time period does not apply to students enrolled in 
programs governed by state and/or federal regulations where 
current academic requirements may need to be met. Students 
should check with their departments where applicable.) 

The graduation requirements for a second degree are as follows: 

1 ) The completion of a minimum of 30 semester hours through 
Bridgewater State College, as a degree-seeking student, 
beyond the first degree with a minimum cumulative grade 
point average (GPA) of 2.0 (or higher if required by the 
major department). 

2) The completion of at least one half of the required courses in 
the second degree major (excluding cognate requirements) 
through Bridgewater State College. The remainder of the 
major requirements may be satisfied by the transfer of courses 
from another accredited institution. 



46 



Undergraduate Academic Policies 



3) A minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 (or 
higher if required by the major department) in the student's 
major requirements taken through Bridgewater State College. 
The major GPA includes all courses completed in the major 
field (excluding cognate requirements). The minor GPA 
includes all courses required for completion of the minor, 
regardless of the department in which the courses are offered. 

4) The completion of all cognate requirements for the major as 
outlined on the adviser-approved course of study. 

The Bridgewater State College Core Curriculum Requirements 
are satisfied by the student's first bachelor's degree, whether that 
degree was earned through Bridgewater State College or anoth- 
er accredited institution. Each student, however, must fulfill the 
state-mandated requirement in United States and Massachusetts 
Constitutions. 

Both the cumulative grade point average (GPA) and the major 
grade point average (GPA) for the second degree will be based 
on all grades received through Bridgewater State College, and all 
undergraduate courses will appear on one continuous academic 
record. A student must maintain a minimum 2.0 cumulative GPA 
in order to remain in good academic standing at the college and 
continue in the program. Upon completion of the second degree, 
the student will be eligible to attend commencement and gradu- 
ate with honors based on the cumulative GPA for all undergradu- 
ate-level work attempted through Bridgewater State College. 



GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Academic excellence for the baccalaureate program is recog- 
nized by awarding degrees summa cum laude (cumulative GPA of 
3.8 or higher), magna cum laude (cumulative GPA of 3.6 to 3.79), 
and cum laude (cumulative GPA of 3.3 to 3.59). The cumulative 
GPA determined for honors is based on all college-level work 
attempted through Bridgewater State College. 

The Commencement Program is printed prior to grades 
being submitted for the student's final semester; therefore, 
the Registrar's Office must print the honors designation that a 
student has earned up to the time of publication. The student's 
diploma and finalized transcript, however, will reflect the official 
honors designation based upon the student's final grade 
point average. 



GRADING SYSTEM 

The college uses the letter-grade system of marking to indicate 
the student's relative performance: A (Superior); B (Good); 
C (Satisfactory); D (Poor); F (Failure); IP (In Progress); W 
(Withdrawn). Grades in the A, B, C, and D ranges may include a 
designation of plus or minus. In computing averages, grades are 
assigned the following numerical values: 



A 


4.0 


B- 


2.7 


D+ 


1.3 


A- 


3.7 


C+ 


2.3 


D 


1.0 


B+ 


3.3 


c 


2.0 


D- 


0.7 


B 


3.0 


- c- 


1.7 


F 


0.0 



Certain courses such as internships and practica may be 
offered on a Pass (P)/No Pass (N) basis. Courses whose credits 
cannot be used toward degree credits earned (ex. Freshman 
Skills (FRSK) courses) are assigned grades of Satisfactory (S)/ 
Unsatisfactory (U). No numeric value is assigned to grades P, N, 
S or U. A symbol of WA may be given to any student who ceases 
attending a course without withdrawing between the end of the 
drop/add period and the end of the withdrawal period. 

Grades for all courses (day and evening) at Bridgewater State 
College become a part of the student's record and are used in 
computing the GPA. 



AUDIT 

A student may audit (AU) a course to gain knowledge in a par- 
ticular subject area without earning credit or a grade. Students 
auditing a course attend and participate in classes; however, they 
are exempt from examinations. The course is automatically des- 
ignated AU and becomes part of the student's permanent aca- 
demic record. Audited courses will not be used to fulfill degree 
or graduation requirements. Students must submit a completed 
Course Audit Request form before the close of the drop/add 
period. Forms are available at the Registrar's Office. 



CHANGE OF GRADE 

If a student believes that a mistake was made in the original 
grade recorded for a course, the student may petition the 
instructor for a change of grade no later than the last day of 
final exams in the academic semester following that in which 
the grade was recorded. A change of grade will not be consid- 
ered after this time. 



DEAN'S LIST 

The dean's list is published at the end of each semester to honor 
the academic achievement of full-time, degree-seeking under- 
graduate students. A 3.3 average for the semester is required 
with a minimum of 1 2 credits completed and no grades of 
"incomplete" (IN). 



GRADE POINT AVERAGE (GPA) 

The Grade Point Average indicates the student's overall academic 
average. It is calculated on both a semester and a cumulative 
basis. The GPA is computed by multiplying the grade numerical 
value received in each course by the number of credit hours per 
course. These totals are combined, and the result is divided by the 
total number of semester hours carried. 



Example 


No. Of 










Course 


Hours 




Grade 




Total 


Biology 


3 


X 


(A) 


4.0 


12.0 


French 


3 


X 


(C+) 


2.3 


6.9 


English 


3 


X 


(B) 


3.0 


9.0 


History 


3 


X 


(B+) 


3.3 


9.9 


Math 


3 


X 


(B-) 


2.7 


8.1 




15 








45.9 




45.9- 


15 


= 3.06 GPA 







Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Undergraduate Academic Policies 



Ilk 1 1 M.I * M I K 

STATE COLLEGE 



Projecting an Anticipated Grade Point Average 

If a student hopes to earn an overall 3.3 GPA, he or she can 
project the semester GPA needed to achieve this goal by follow- 
ing the steps listed below: 



1) 3.3 

desired GPA 



2) 99.0 
necessary 
qrade points 
for desired GPA 

3) 53.1 
grade 

points needed 



30 

total credit 
hours at the end 
of next semester 

45.9 

grade points already 
earned 

15 

credit hours 
for next semester 



990 

necessary grade 
points 

53.1 

grade points 
needed next 
semester 

3.54 

semester GPA 
needed for an 
overall 3.3 GPA 



INCOMPLETE 

An incomplete (IN) may be given at the discretion of the instruc- 
tor. The time by which missing work must be made up, both in 
graduate and undergraduate courses, is also at the discretion of 
the instructor; however, this time period may not extend beyond 
the last day of classes of the academic semester following that in 
which the incomplete was earned. If a course is not successfully 
completed by this deadline, the incomplete will automatically 
be changed to a grade of "F" (Failure), "N" (No Pass), or "U" 
(Unsatisfactory). 

All work must be completed prior to graduation, including 
resolution of any grades of incomplete. The record is finalized as 
of the date the degree is conferred. 

MID-SEMESTER WARNING NOTICES 

Faculty may elect to send mid-semester warning notices to 
undergraduate students who are receiving less than a " C - " (1.7) 
average in any course at that time. It is the student's responsibil- 
ity to meet with his/her adviser and the instructor of any course 
in which a warning is received. Since mid-semester warning 
notices are not issued by all instructors, students who do not 
receive notification are cautioned not to presume that they are 
maintaining a grade of "C-" or better. 

REPEAT COURSES 

Undergraduate students may repeat a course for which they 
receive a grade of "C-" or less. Although all courses will appear 
on the student's transcript, credit for the course will be awarded 
only once unless otherwise stated in the college catalog. For 
the first three times that a course is taken, only the most recent 
grade will be used to calculate the GPA, regardless of which 
grade is higher. All grades for courses taken the third and subse- 
quent times will be used in the calculation of the student's GPA. 
(Only courses taken at Bridgewater State College and 
repeated at Bridgewater State College will be eligible 
for use under this policy.) This policy does not apply to 
courses taken after a student has been awarded a bachelor's 
degree from Bridgewater State College. 



Note Repeating courses taken in a previous semester may 
affect certain federal and state benefits, various financial aid 
programs, loans, scholarships and social security benefits, in 
addition to athletic eligibility and veteran's benefits. The Veterans 
Administration will not pay for a repeated course in which a 
passing grade has been previously earned. Satisfactory Academic 
Progress requirements must be met for continued financial aid 
eligibility. 

REGISTRATION AND ENROLLMENT 
POLICIES 



ATTENDANCE POLICY 

Students are responsible for satisfactory attendance in each 
course for which they are registered. Satisfactory attendance 
shall be determined by the instructor within the context of this 
policy statement. The approval of excused absences and the 
assignment of make-up work are the prerogative of the course 
instructor. The college's health services does not make judgments 
about whether a student can attend class except in rare cases 
when attendance would be harmful to the student's health or 
the health of others. In general, students will be excused without 
penalty for reasons such as illness, participation in official college 
events, personal emergencies and religious holidays. Students 
should consult with faculty members in advance of any absence 
whenever feasible. 

NOTE: If a student fails to attend the first three class hours 
of a course, the instructor has the option of deleting the student 
from the class roster. 

If a student has a concern with regard to the attendance poli- 
cies or a faculty member has a concern about a student's exces- 
sive absence, he or she should confer with the chairperson of 
the department. 

CHANGE/DECLARATION OF 
CONCENTRATION 

To elect a concentration, students must complete a Concentra- 
tion Declaration Form in the Academic Achievement Center. 
Students may change their concentration at anytime by obtaining 
the necessary form from the Academic Achievement Center. 

CHANGE/DECLARATION OF MAJOR FOR 
FRESHMEN 

All students who enter as freshmen must formally declare 
a major or choose the status of an undeclared major. The 
undeclared student should select a major by the end of the 
sophomore year. Freshmen may change their area of interest by 
obtaining the necessary forms from the Academic Achievement 
Center. Although early childhood, elementary education and 
special education majors may not be formally admitted into the 
teacher education program until the second semester of the 
sophomore year, they must confirm their continued interest in 
these majors by the same process used by the other freshmen 
for declaration of majors. In addition to their education program, 
students must also elect a major in the liberal arts. 



Undergraduate Academic Policies 



bSc 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



CHANGE OF MAJOR FOR UPPERCLASSMEN 

Students may change majors at any time by obtaining the neces- 
sary forms from the Academic Achievement Center, securing the 
signatures of the department chairpersons involved, and filing 
the completed form with the Registrar's office. 

CHANGE/DECLARATION OF MINOR 

In order to be enrolled in any minor offered by the college, a 
student must declare the intended minor on forms available 
from the Academic Achievement Center. Students may change 
their minor at anytime by obtaining the necessary form from the 
Academic Achievement Center. 

Degree-seeking students planning on being certified as sec- 
ondary or middle school teachers should declare their minor in 
secondary education during their freshman or sophomore year. 

Certification that the requirements of the minor have been 
met is made on the Degree Application card by the department 
offering the minor. Students must achieve a minimum 2.0 cumu- 
lative average in declared minors for graduation. 

CLASSIFICATION DESIGNATION 

Degree-seeking students are designated as being in a given clas- 
sification on the basis of the number of credits they have earned 
for courses completed successfully. The list below shows the 
number of credits that must be recorded in order for a student to 
be designated as a member of a particular classification. 

Students should understand that these are minimum totals of 
credits accrued. The normal course load is 1 5 credits per semes- 
ter, and it is this total which, maintained over eight semesters, 
yields the 1 20 credits required as a minimum for the baccalaure- 
ate degree. 

For registration purposes, degree-seeking students will be classi- 
fied based upon the total number of credit hours earned prior to the 
semester in which the registration is held. 

Classification Credit Hours 
Completed 

Senior 84 
Junior 54 
Sophomore 24 
Freshman 

COURSE AUDIT 

Students may audit courses under the guidelines noted below. 
The student will receive no academic credit for the courses nor 
will a grade be reflected in his or her cumulative grade point 
average. 

• A student may audit a course subject to the approval of his 
or her adviser or department chairperson and consent of 
the instructor. 

• A student is subject to conditions established by the depart- 
ment and/or instructor for the audited course. 

• A student registering for credit has course enrollment prefer- 
ence over an auditing student. Therefore, a student must reg- 
ister for audit only during the drop/add period by submitting 



forms provided by the Registrar's Office. A student's status 
as an auditor in a course cannot be changed. 

• A student may register for one audit course per semester. 
Exception may be granted by petition to the appropriate 
school dean. 

• A student receives no credit for an audited course. The 
student's academic record will reflect the course enrollment 
with the notation AU. 

• A student will be charged the same tuition and fees for an 
audited course as for a course taken for credit. 

COURSE DROPS AND ADDS 

The Drop/Add Schedule is as follows: 

• The Drop/Add period for 15-week semester courses ends 
after the 6 th weekday of the semester. 

• The Drop/Add period for seven-week quarter courses ends 
after the 3 rd weekday of the quarter. 

• The Drop/Add period for five-week summer courses ends 
after the 3 rd weekday of the session. 

• The Drop/Add period for 10-week summer courses ends after 
the 5 th weekday of the session. 

• The Drop/Add period for nonregular courses ends one week- 
day after the first class meeting. However, students cannot 
add intensive - e.g., weekend or one-week - courses after 
the first class meeting. 

No adds or drops will be permitted after these deadlines. Drop/ 
Add forms are available at the Registrar's Office during the drop/ 
add period. It is advisable that students discuss changes in their 
schedule with their adviser. 

If students fail to drop courses appropriately, a grade of "F" 
may be entered on their academic record. This grade will be used 
in computing the GPA. 

COURSE LOAD 

Full-time undergraduate students must carry a course load of 1 2 
to 1 8 credit hours or the equivalent each semester. The typical 
course load is 1 5 credit hours. Students wishing to carry more 
than 18 credit hours must receive permission from the appropri- 
ate school dean prior to registration. Failure to carry at least 12 
credit hours may jeopardize housing, financial aid status and 
athletic eligibility. 

Undergraduate students wishing to carry a course load of 
more than 14 credit hours during the summer must obtain per- 
mission from the appropriate school dean prior to registration. 

It is recommended that students not carry semester courses 
during the semester in which they enroll in student teaching. 

Note: Intersession credits are included in the spring semester 
in determining the student's time status. 

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

The college encourages qualified students to meet certain gradu- 
ation requirements through "Credit by Examination." Currently 
the college will award credit for successful completion of the 
College Level Examination Program's (CLEP) general or subject 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at vwwv.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Undergraduate Academic Policies 




area examinations. In addition, certain departments offer their 
own examinations for which credit can be awarded. Additional 
information can be obtained from the Test Center in the 
Academic Achievement Center, 508.53 1 . 1 780 

See the "Undergraduate Admission " section of this catalog 
for further information concerning credit by examination. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS ELIGIBILITY 

The following five rules govern intercollegiate athletics eligibility 
for most students attending Bndgewater. 

1) A student athlete must be a full-time, degree-seeking under- 
graduate student. 

2) A student athlete must maintain a minimum of 1 2 credit 
hours or the equivalent each semester. 

3) A student athlete must maintain a minimum grade point aver- 
age (GPA) of 2.0. 

4) A student-athlete must pass 24 credit hours (normal progress 
rule) or the equivalent in an academic year as a full-time 
student. 

5) A student athlete must sign the NCAA student athlete state- 
ment concerning eligibility, a Buckley Amendment consent 
and a drug testing consent. 

Student athletes are required to undergo both physical 
and orthopedic examinations prior to competing on intercol- 
legiate teams. Specific information on these exams can be 
obtained either from the director of athletics or from the head 
athletic trainer. 

In addition, there are very specific requirements which must 
be met by transfer students from other four-year institutions, 
transfer students from two-year or junior colleges and students 
who have been involved in multiple transfers. For information, 
please confer with the director of athletics. 

On a case-by-case basis, a student enrolled in a part-time 
academic course load, as an accommodation to a documented 
disability, will not be excluded from participating in athletic pro- 
grams. The student shall follow the normal petition and appeal 
processes through the director of athletics and recreation. 



MAKE-UP TESTS AND EXAMINATIONS 

The procedure for making up an examination held during the 
semester is determined by the individual instructor or the depart- 
ment. If a student misses an examination, it is the student's 
responsibility to notify the instructor immediately so that alterna- 
tive arrangements may be made. 

The privilege of making up a final examination will be granted 
only when the cause has been the serious illness of the student 
or a member of his or her immediate family. All such excuses 
must be documented by a medical doctor and submitted to the 
instructor of the course. 



PREREQUISITES 

Students must have the necessary prerequisite for each course. 
Prerequisites, if any, are indicated with the individual course 
listing and are enforced at the time of registration. Prerequisite 
courses taken at institutions other than Bndgewater State 
College must be documented (transcript or grade report, and in 
some cases, course description) prior to registration. 

Students who wish to enroll in a course without the 
prerequisite(s) must obtain a Prerequisite Override Form prior 
to registering for the course. The form must be signed by the 
chairperson of the department through which the course is 
offered and, in some cases, the instructor of the course. Students 
seeking an override of professional education prerequisites 
for courses taught through the School of Education and Allied 
Studies must complete a Request for a Student to Take an Upper 
Level Professional Education Course Without Formal Program 
Admission form and obtain all required signatures. 



REGISTRATION 

Preregistration is held for returning, degree-seeking undergraJu- 
ate, graduate and joint admission students in November for the 
spring semester and in April for the fall semester. During the 
advising period held two weeks prior to registration, a student 
meets with his/her adviser to review the student's progress 
toward meeting core curriculum requirements and specific 
degree requirements. A class schedule is developed, and the 
student's registration form is signed by the adviser. In the case of 
double majors, the form must be signed by both advisers. 

Preregistration is available via the Web and in person. 
Students who wish to register via the Web must secure elec- 
tronic permission to register from their adviser at their advis- 
ing session. Preregistration time is based on the student's 
classification (senior, junior, sophomore, etc.) at the close of 
the previous semester. An undergraduate non-degree seeking 
student may register for courses after the registration sessions 
for new degree-seeking students have been held in August and 
January. For more information about non-degree status, see the 
"Undergraduate Admission" section of this catalog. Students will 
not be allowed to register for courses until all financial debts to 
the college are paid and health records are up to date. 

Prior to each registration period, course listings, specific reg- 
istration dates and registration instructions as well as up-to-date 
information concerning course openings and prerequisites are 
online through InfoBear under QuickLinks at the Bridgewater 
State College Web site www.bridgew.edu/infobear. 



50 



Undergraduate Academic Policies 



bSc 

BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



TRANSFER OF CREDIT AFTER ADMISSION 

In order to receive credit for courses taken at other accredited 
institutions, degree-seeking undergraduate students must obtain 
approval in advance. Failure to obtain this approval could result 
in denial of the course credit. 

Request forms are available on the Registrar's Web site 
at www.bridgew.edu/registrar and in the Registrar's Office. 
Requests for approval of a course from another institution should 
be accompanied by the course description from that institution's 
catalog. Approval must be obtained prior to registering for the 
course at the other institution. It is the student's responsibility 
to have official transcripts sent directly by the institution to the 
Registrar's Office upon completion of the course. 

NOTE: A minimum grade of "C-" is required for 
credit transfer. Of the 90 credits that may be accepted in 
transfer by Bridgewater State College and applied to the bac- 
calaureate degree, only 69 credits will be accepted from two-year 
institutions. Grades for courses taken at an institution 
other than Bridgewater State College are not used in 
computing the student's GPA. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE 

Forms for official withdrawal from the college may be obtained 
from the Academic Achievement Center located in the Maxwell 
Library. Professional staff from the Academic Achievement Center 
will assist in completing the process, including the review of 
alternatives available to the student. Should the student leave 
the college without giving official notification, failing grades will 
be recorded for all courses. After the 1 th week of classes, grades 
will be recorded for all classes and the withdrawal will not be 
effective until the last day of the semester. 



The Course Withdrawal Schedule is as follows: 

• The withdrawal period for 1 5-week semester courses ends 
the weekday following the completion of the tenth week of 
the semester. 

• The withdrawal period for seven-week quarter courses ends 
the weekday following the completion of the fifth week of 
the quarter. 

• The withdrawal period for five-week summer courses ends 
the weekday following the completion of the third week of 
the session. 

• The withdrawal period for 10-week summer courses ends the 
weekday following the completion of the seventh week of 
the session. 

• The withdrawal period for nonregular courses typically ends 
one weekday following the point when approximately 70 
percent of the course has been completed. Students should 
consult the Registrar's Office for exact deadlines for with- 
drawal from these courses. 

• Students who are taking a course online or off-campus or 
who are non-degree seeking must meet established dead- 
lines and procedures. 

No withdrawals will be permitted after these deadlines unless 
the student can demonstrate that extraordinary circumstances 
(e.g., sudden illness, a death in the family) have prevented the 
student from withdrawing by the published deadline. Consult the 
Academic Achievement Center for more information about with- 
drawals after the deadline. 

Course withdrawals will be indicated on the student's 
transcript with a "W" and will not affect the calculation of the 
student's grade point average. 



WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES FOLLOWING 
THE DROP/ADD PERIOD 

Students may withdraw from courses following the drop/add 
period if they submit a Course Withdrawal Form to the Registrar's 
Office by the appropriate semester deadline date, which is posted 
at www.bridgew.edu/registrar/dropaddwithdraw.cfm.The Course 
Withdrawal Form must be signed by the course instructor and the 
student's adviser or the chairperson of student's major depart- 
ment to acknowledge that the student has conferred with these 
parties. If a student falls below full-time status after withdrawing 
from a course, he or she should be aware that eligibility for 
some sources of financial aid and health insurance and participa- 
tion in extra curricular activities and on-campus housing may 
be affected. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



51 



School of Graduate Studies 



IIKIIK.IIMIH 
MA! I < oil X.I 



Dr. William Smith, 508 531 2809 
Dean, School of Graduate Studies 

Dr. Raymond Guillette, 508.53 1 . 1 300 
Assistant Dean 

Web site: www.bridgew.edu/sogs/ 

The School of Graduate Studies is responsible for the admmistra 
tion of all graduate courses and programs. 

The School of Graduate Studies at Bridgewater State College 
provides leadership, coordination and support for all academic 
departments engaged in graduate instruction. The graduate 
dean, the graduate faculty and the Graduate Education Council 
are responsible for the maintenance of appropriate standards for 
graduate degrees and certificates. 

The primary objective of Bridgewater State College's gradu- 
ate programs is to increase to an advanced level each graduate 
student's understanding of and competence in a designated field 
of study. By extending the student's area of knowledge, research 
skills and creative talents, the graduate programs of the college 
aim to increase the individual's ability to pursue and contribute 
to a satisfying career. 

The School of Graduate Studies is located in the Maxwell 
Library, ground floor, Park Avenue entrance. With some excep- 
tions, the office is open Monday through Thursday from 8 am to 
7:30 pm and Friday from 8 am to 5 pm. The office is open evenings 
only when classes are in session. Contact the School of Graduate 
Studies for evening hours at 508.53 1 . 1 300 or e-mail at grad- 
school@bridgew.edu. 

Persons interested in pursuing a master's degree, certificate of 
advanced graduate study (CAGS) or postbaccalaureate licensure 
program on either a full- or part-time basis should request appro- 
priate application materials from the School of Graduate Studies. 
Students are responsible for being aware of the general policies, 
procedures and requirements for graduate courses and programs 
outlined in the following pages prior to enrolling in courses 
carrying graduate credit. 

For additional information relative to a specific graduate 
program, students should contact the appropriate department 
graduate program coordinator in the department involved. 



GENERAL POLICIES AND 
PROCEDURES 

Students are responsible for all information given in the latest 
edition of the catalog. Students who have questions regarding 
the graduate regulations presented in this catalog should contact 
the School of Graduate Studies. 



ACADEMIC INTEGRITY POLICY 

The School of Graduate Studies at Bridgewater State College, like 
all institutions of higher learning, considers academic integrity to 
be an important hallmark for graduate students and scholars. The 
importance of academic integrity and honesty, which is taught 
at the undergraduate level, continues to be even more vital for 
scholars and researchers at the graduate level, who find them- 
selves writing seminar papers, research papers and theses. All 
graduate degree programs at Bridgewater State College require 
courses in research where conventions of documentation are 
taught. Graduate students, who are acquiring scholarly habits 
and skills in degree programs, must rely on the scholarship that 
has preceded them, and they must acknowledge the scholarship 
in their own academic work by adhering to the time-honored 
conventions of their discipline. In short, graduate students are 
entering a community of scholars and must respect the rules 
and traditions of that community. Sometimes, however, graduate 
students violate the accepted principles and policies of academic 
integrity and honesty. The dean of the School of Graduate Studies 
reviews any infractions of academic integrity. The following 
examples represent a partial list of serious breaches of 
academic integrity: 

• Plagiarizing any published or online source, including 
"Blackboard" and other online discussions, and claiming 
them as one's own; 

• Not properly documenting quotations and paraphrases in 
one's texts, i.e., not using footnotes, endnotes, parenthetical 
citations or other conventional methods of documentation; 

• Inadequate paraphrasing, with or without proper 
documentation; 

• Copying portions of Internet sources without proper 
documentation and citations; 

• Creating false documentation, i.e., purposely fabricating 
information used in references, endnotes and footnotes; 

• Using or copying from another student's written work with or 
without the student's permission; 

• Taking an examination for another student; 

• Cheating on an examination; 

• Purchasing a paper or assignment from an online source or 
another student and claiming it as one's own; 

• Writing a paper or report for another student; 

• Altering or falsifying data. 

Serious violations of academic integrity are not limited to this list. 
Penalties for academic misconduct may include the following: 

• A grade of "F," "N," or "U" (as appropriate) in the course; 

• A grade of "F" for the assignment being evaluated; 

• The assigning of additional course work; 

• Suspension from graduate programs; 

• Dismissal from graduate programs. 

The procedure for implementing a penalty for academic 
dishonesty or misconduct, which includes, but is not limited to, 
plagiarism and cheating, is as follows: 



b£c 

BRIPGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



School of Graduate Studies 



• The professor will notify graduate students of any alleged 
violations of the Graduate School's Academic Integrity Policy, 
and they shall discuss the matter in person, via e-mail or by 
phone within seven business days of the discovery of the 
alleged misconduct. (The professor may invite a third party to 
the meeting, if warranted.) If it is determined that academic 
dishonesty or misconduct has occurred, the students' advis- 
ers, the graduate program coordinators, department chair- 
persons, the appropriate school deans and the dean of the 
Graduate School will be notified by the professor in writing 
of the misconduct, the proposed penalty, and the outcome 
of the discussion with the students. A record of the case, 
including the letter from the professor, along with any sup- 
porting documentation, will be kept in students' files at the 
School of Graduate Studies. 

• If the matter is not resolved through the initial process 
described above, students may file letters of appeal within 
five business days to the dean of the School of Graduate 
Studies, attaching any relevant documents. The dean will 
submit appeals to the Graduate Education Council (GEC). 
The professors and the students will be notified of the meet- 
ing times and dates and invited to attend a meeting of the 
Graduate Education Council, at which time matters will be 
reviewed. In conducting its reviews, the Graduate Education 
Council will follow the requirements of due process. Both 
students and professors can attend the meetings with repre- 
sentatives, who may serve as advisers or advocates. 

Under the direction of the chair of the Graduate Education 
Council, the GEC will review student appeals and make its deci- 
sion, which shall be forwarded in writing to the dean of the 
School of Graduate Studies. Based upon the allegations or evi- 
dence received, the Graduate Education Council may recommend 
further sanctions, no change in sanctions or a reduction in sanc- 
tions. The Graduate Education Council will take into account any 
previous infractions only after it concludes its investigation of the 
present case. Further sanctions may include suspension 
or dismissal. 

Students and professors involved will receive copies of the 
decision letter from the Graduate Education Council, and copies 
will be provided to the students' advisers, graduate coordinators, 
department chairs and appropriate school dean. A copy of this 
letter will also be placed in students' official files in the School of 
Graduate Studies. 

ACADEMIC DISMISSAL 

If students' grade point averages (GPAs) remain below a 3.0 for 
two consecutive semesters, their academic progress is in jeop- 
ardy. The School of Graduate Studies makes every attempt not 
to dismiss students from academic programs, though prolonged 
GPAs below 3.0 may result in academic dismissal. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION 

Any degree-seeking or non-degree graduate students whose 
cumulative GPA falls below 3.0 will be notified that they are 
on academic probation. When graduate students are placed on 
academic probation, they will receive a letter from the School of 



Graduate Studies. This letter informs students that they should be 
mindful that their GPA has fallen below a 3.0. Students should 
discuss the matter with their advisers. 

ACADEMIC STANDING FOR GRADUATE 
STUDENTS 

In the courses used to satisfy degree requirements, the minimum 
standard for satisfactory work is a 3.0 average. 

APPEALS 

Graduate students who experience problems pertaining to 
graduate policies, including academic performance, program 
requirements or other academic issues, may petition to have the 
matter considered through the established review process of the 
School of Graduate Studies: 

• Submit a written appeal to the course instructor if the issue 
is course-related or to the academic adviser if the matter is 
program-related. 

• If unresolved, submit a written appeal to the department 
graduate program coordinator. 

• If unresolved, submit a written appeal to the appropriate 
school dean. 

• If unresolved, submit a written appeal to the dean of the 
School of Graduate Studies. 

• The dean of the School of Graduate Studies will submit grad- 
uate student petitions to the Graduate Education Council for 
review. (The Graduate Education Council consists of repre- 
sentatives from the college's graduate faculty, administrators 
and graduate student body.) 

CHANGE OF GRADE 

If students believe that a mistake was made in the original grade 
recorded for a course, they may petition instructors for a change 
of grade no later than the last day of final exams in the academic 
semester following that in which the grade was recorded. A 
change of grade will not be considered after this time. 

CHANGE OF NAME AND/OR ADDRESS 

Students must promptly notify the Registrar's Office of any 
change in name or address by using the appropriate form. 
Official legal documentation (i.e., marriage certificate) must 
be presented. Forms may be printed from the college Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/registrar/forms.cfm. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION 

In most graduate programs, graduate students must take com- 
prehensive examinations that reflect the full ranges of their 
programs. The comprehensive examination is based upon the 
students' major areas of study, as well as related areas, and may 
include work done on a thesis. Students must give evidence that 
they can integrate information and ideas from the various areas 
in which they have studied. The comprehensive examination 
may be written, oral and/or Web-based, as determined by the 
students' departments. The academic departments determine the 
format of their comprehensive examinations. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 




School of Graduate Studies 



KKIIX.I % A I I K 

ram coixbgb 



To be eligible for a comprehensive examination, students 
should be near completion of the course work specified by 
their major academic departments. Students who plan to take 
the comprehensive examination must file a Comprehensive 
Examination Request form in the School of Graduate Studies, 
with a nonrefundable comprehensive examination fee of S60 for 
master's degree candidates and S75 for CAGS candidates. 

Checks should be made payable to Bridgewater State College. 
The completed forms with necessary signatures and fees must be 
filed in the School of Graduate Studies on or before the appropri- 
ate application deadlines: 

Oct. 1 for November comprehensive examinations 

Feb. 1 for March/April comprehensive examinations 

Ordinarily, comprehensive examinations are given during the 
months of November and March/April. The academic depart- 
ments set the specific date of the comprehensive examination. 

All students who take the comprehensive examination will 
receive their results by mail in a timely fashion. 

Students who fail the comprehensive examination shall be 
given one additional opportunity to pass. Students should meet 
immediately with their faculty advisers or designated personnel 
to review weaknesses of their performances, and prescribed pro- 
grams of study should be designed to help students prepare for 
the second examination. After students have made substantial 
progress in the additional work prescribed by the department, 
students will be allowed to retake the comprehensive examina- 
tions. Students will be required to notify the School of Graduate 
Studies of the exam date and repay the comprehensive examina- 
tion fee. Students who fail a second comprehensive examination 
are subject to academic dismissal. 



CONTINUATION OR INTERRUPTION OF 
COURSE REGISTRATION 

Graduate students have six years to complete their degree pro- 
grams. Should graduate students not enroll in courses during 
the fall or spring semesters or summer sessions, students will be 
considered inactive. If students are deemed inactive and wish to 
register for courses, they should seek reinstatement by contact- 
ing the School of Graduate Studies at 508.53 1 . 1 300 or www. 
bridgew.edu/sogs. This policy is designed to ensure appropriate 
academic advising and counseling for all graduate students 
enrolled in degree programs as well as nondegree students. 



COURSE DROPS AND ADDS 

The Drop/Add schedule is as follows: 

• The Drop/Add period for 1 5-week semester courses ends 
after the sixth weekday of the semester. 

• The Drop/Add period for seven-week quarter courses ends 
after the third weekday of the quarter. 

• The Drop/Add period for five-week summer courses ends 
after the third weekday of the session. 

• The Drop/Add period for 10-week summer courses ends after 
the fifth weekday of the session. 



• The Drop/Add period for non-regular courses ends one 
weekday after the first class meeting. However, students 
cannot add intensive - e.g., weekend or one-week - courses 
after the first class meeting. 

No adds or drops will be permitted after these deadlines. 
Drop/Add forms are available at the Registrar's Office during the 
drop/add period. It is advisable that students discuss changes in 
their schedule with their adviser. 

If students fail to drop courses appropriately, a grade of "F" 
will be entered on their academic record. This grade will be used 

in computing the GPA. 



COURSE LOAD 

Full-time graduate study for master's degree and CAGS students 
is defined, for academic purposes only, as being enrolled in nine 
or more graduate credits in a given semester. To be considered 
full-time, postbaccalaureate program students must carry a 
course load of at least 1 2 credits each semester, as defined under 
"Course Loads" in the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" sec- 
tion of this catalog. (The Accelerated Postbaccalaureate program 
does not fall into this category.) 

Full-time graduate students may register for up to 1 5 credits 
during the fall and spring semesters and up to six credits during 
each of the two summer sessions. Students wishing to register 
for more than the maximum credit load must receive permission 
in writing from their graduate advisers and graduate program 
coordinators. 

Full-time graduate students enrolled in nine credits or more: 
see Immunization Requirements for Graduate Students section. 

Note: Intersession credits are included in the spring semester 
in determining the student's time status. 



COURSE REGISTRATION 

Prior to the registration period for the fall and spring semesters 
and summer sessions, a course schedule is published by the 
Registrar's Office. Hard copies of this schedule are available at 
the Registrar's Office and the School of Graduate Studies. The 
course schedule is also available online through InfoBear at 
www.bridgew.edu. Graduate students are not required to have 
registration forms signed by their advisers; however, graduate 
students should consult their advisers on a regular basis regard- 
ing their course schedules. 

Graduate course work is offered on either a full- or part-time 
basis. Students should realize that it is not possible to set an 
absolute deadline for completing a graduate program due to 
such factors as the college's need to reserve the right to cancel 
any course for which there is insufficient enrollment and the need 
of the departments to offer courses on a rotating basis. 



DEADLINES 

Graduate students are reminded of their responsibility to con- 
sult the School of Graduate Studies Web site at www.bridgew. 
edu/sogs for deadlines and dates for admission, comprehensive 
examination requests and applications to graduate. 



School of Graduate Studies 



DIRECTED OR INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Graduate students are allowed to undertake a directed or 
independent study under the supervision of a faculty member. 
The course Directed Study XXXX 503 (credit to be arranged) is 
designed for graduate students who desire to study selected 
topics in their fields. Directed study may not be used to substitute 
for courses that are required in the program or to study topics 
that are covered in required or elective courses in the program. 

Directed study follows the same registration procedures as 
all academic course work on campus; that is, arrangement for 
directed study must take place prior to the time of registration 
with all forms completed and on file at the appropriate depart- 
mental office. Enrollment in directed study is limited to students 
who have been accepted to a graduate program at Bridgewater 
State College and who have completed a minimum of 1 5 
approved graduate credits. 



GRADING SYSTEM 

The School of Graduate Studies requires that degree-seeking 
graduate students maintain a high level of academic standing 
as they advance in their degree programs. The grading system 
for graduate students at BSC is different from that of the under- 
graduate programs. Graduate course achievement will be rated 
A (4.0), A- (3.7), B+ (3.3), B (3.0), B- (2.7), C+ (2.3), C (2.0), C- 
(1 .7), F (0),W (Withdrawn), IN (Incomplete), or AU (Audit). Some 
courses are graded on a P (Pass)/N (No Pass) or S (Satisfactory)/U 
(Unsatisfactory) basis. Refer to the "Course Descriptions" section 
in this catalog. 

This grading system puts more pressure on graduate students 
to perform at a higher level than undergraduate students.Though 
graduate students may earn less than a B in a course, the overall 
GPA must be a 3.0 at the time of graduation. 



GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE CREDIT 

Courses at BSC with 500- and 600-level numbers carry graduate 
credit and are open only to graduate students. 

An undergraduate may request to enroll in a 500-level course for 
undergraduate credit. Approval is based upon the following criteria: 

• Students must be seniors in their last semester of course 
work. 

• Students' GPAs must be a 3.5 or higher. 

• Students' written requests must be approved by the chair of 
the students' major departments, academic school dean and 
the dean of the School of Graduate Studies. 

Certain designated 400-level courses may be taken for either 
graduate or undergraduate credit. The School of Graduate 
Studies guidelines for faculty teaching these courses indicate 
that advanced work must be required of graduate students tak- 
ing 400-level courses. The guidelines recommend more rigorous 
examinations and preparation of longer, more sophisticated 
research papers, so that graduate students may take into account 
the different quantitative and qualitative standards associated 
with graduate study. It is the responsibility of graduate students 
to register for the graduate-level section of 400-level courses. 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP 

Graduate assistantships are available to full-time students who 
are admitted to a graduate program and who maintain good 
academic standing during the time of the assistantship. The total 
assistantship equals approximately $ 1 2, 500 per academic year, 
which includes tuition and fee remission for up to 1 2 credits 
per fall and spring semesters, plus a stipend. The stipend varies 
between $600 and $650 per month. Graduate assistantships 
are competitive and are determined on the basis of undergradu- 
ate and/or graduate grade point average, test scores, letters of 
recommendation, pertinent experience, educational preparation, 
interviews or a combination of these factors. Graduate assistants 
work in an academic department or administrative office of the 
college for 20 hours per week. Assistantships are intended to 
encourage and assist superior students in pursuing graduate 
study and in completing the requirements for graduate degrees 
in the minimum possible time. 



GRADUATE RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP 

Admitted full- and part-time graduate students may apply to the 
Graduate Research Assistantship program. Graduate Research 
Assistantships are designed to link a graduate student together 
with a professor in a meaningful research project, which will 
be one semester or one academic year in duration. During the 
assistantship period, a graduate research assistant will work 
directly with a professor on a joint project, which will lead to a 
presentation at a professional conference and/or a joint publica- 
tion. The research assistant will have the equivalent of a "half" 
assistantship, in that the student will work ten hours per week 
with a professor, be paid a half-stipend (approximately $3,000 
per year), and have tuition/fees remission for six graduate credits 
per fall and spring semesters. 



GRADUATION APPLICATION 

Students who are nearing the completion of their graduate pro- 
gram requirements and who plan to receive a master's degree or 
CAGS in January, May or August should complete an Application 
to Graduate form. These forms must be completed by students, 
approved by the students' advisers and graduate program coor- 
dinators, and submitted with the candidates' Graduate Program 
Proposal forms to the School of Graduate Studies on or before 
the appropriate application deadline. Students should check with 
their advisers regarding exit requirements for their academic 
program, as requirements vary for each program. 

Feb. 1 for May graduation 

June 1 for August graduation 

Oct. 1 for January graduation 

Failure to file an application before the deadline may postpone 
degree conferral. Any questions regarding graduate commence- 
ment and requirements should be directed to the School of 
Graduate Studies at 508.531.1300. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



School of Graduate Studies 



GRADUATION DATES 

Though graduate students have a separate annual commence- 
ment ceremony in May, the college has three graduation dates 
(January, May and August). Students graduating in January and 
August are encouraged to attend the May commencement cer- 
emony. In order to participate in a commencement ceremony, all 
required course work and exit requirements must be completed 
No degree or certificate will be conferred, and no graduate tran 
scripts will be issued unless all outstanding financial balances 
have been paid in full. 



GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

In order for students to exit from a graduate program, they 
must satisfactorily complete all credit requirements (with a 
minimum GPA of 3.0), and, in most programs, pass a 
comprehensive examination. 



IMMUNIZATION REQUIREMENTS FOR 
GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Immunization requirements apply to all full-time graduate stu- 
dents, regardless of age. To achieve full time graduate student 
status, according to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Immunization Laws, students must be enrolled in nine or more 
credits from one institution in any one semester, regardless of 
the location of the course or the actual dates that the course or 
internship is held. 

Proof of immunizations must be provided by a physician or a 
prior school and must include the dates of: 

• two doses of measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) after the 
patient's first birthday and after 1967 

• one dose of tetanus diphtheria (TD) within the last 10 years 

• three doses of hepatitis B 

Note: All new residential students must provide proof of 
meningitis immunization or waiver. Proof must be: 

• documentation of one dose of meningitis immunization 
within five years or 

• sign the meningitis waiver at www.bridgew. 
edu/HealthServices/Health%20Form%20and%20 
Meningitis%20Waiver.doc. 

The Health Services staff can assist you in meeting the 
requirements by offering immunizations and advice on how to 
be compliant with the law. Failure to comply places future 
registration for classes on hold until all requirements 
are met. 

Please call Health Services at 508.53 1 . 1 252 to arrange 
an appointment. 



INCOMPLETE 

An incomplete (IN) may be given at the discretion of the instruc 
tor. The time by which missing work must be made up, in gradu- 
ate and undergraduate courses, is also at the discretion of the 
instructor; however, this time period may not extend beyond the 
last day of classes of the academic semester following that in 



which the incomplete was earned. Courses that are not success- 
fully completed by this deadline will automatically be changed 
to a grade of "F" (Failure) or "N" (No Pass). Candidates for 
graduation should note, however, that all work must be com- 
pleted prior to graduation, including resolution of any grades 
of incomplete, since as of the date the degree is conferred the 
record is finalized. 



PROGRAM AND COURSE PREREQUISITES 

Program and course prerequisites may be required to ensure 
adequate preparation for graduate work in the area of study 
In certain cases, program prerequisites may be fulfilled after 
the applicant's acceptance by the School of Graduate Studies. 
Certain advanced courses may require that students have com- 
pleted specific prerequisite courses 



REPEAT COURSE POLICY 

Graduate-level courses may be taken more than once; however, 
only the grade earned in the initial course may be included in the 
degree requirements. 



RESEARCH 

A graduate program may require enrollment in the course 
Research XXXX 502 (credit to be arranged) or PSYC 504 for 
Psychology for completion of original research undertaken by 
graduate students in their field. The students' investigations 
ordinarily culminate in theses. The number of credits awarded for 
the research may vary and students may repeat the course until 
a maximum of nine credits in a MA program and six credits in a 
MAT, MEd, MPA, MS or CAGS program is earned toward the min- 
imum credit requirements for the degree or certificate. Consent 
of department and formal application required. 



SATISFACTORY OR REASONABLE PROGRESS 

Graduate students must make satisfactory or reasonable prog- 
ress toward completion of their degree programs within the 
college's statute of limitations. Students who are not making 
such progress are subject to separation from their programs. 



STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS-PROGRAM AND 
COURSES 

All graduate program requirements, including the comprehensive 
examination, must be completed within six years of the date 
of the student's acceptance In addition, no graduate course 
offered for master's degree or CAGS credit may be more than six 
years old at the time program requirements are completed. 

If graduate students cannot complete degree requirements 
within the six-year limit because of extraordinary circumstances, 
they may file written appeals, requesting a reasonable extension 
from the School of Graduate Studies. 



School of Graduate Studies 



THESIS 

A number of departments require or recommend theses in 
master's degree programs. Theses, which represent original 
research in disciplines, are especially recommended if students 
have future doctoral plans. At the same time, theses allow gradu- 
ate students, working closely with theses committees, to spend 
serious academic time researching a narrowly focused topic in 
depth and produce an original text of publishable quality. The 
culmination is often a text that gives students great academic 
pride and satisfaction. 

Students writing master's theses must adhere to the following 
policies: 

1 ) All graduate students writing master's theses must have 
theses committees, consisting of a thesis committee chair- 
person and two faculty readers. The thesis committee must 
be approved by the graduate program coordinator. 

2) Students writing a thesis must submit a Thesis Proposal 
Form, with a detailed proposal and signatures of the thesis 
chairperson, the two faculty readers, the graduate 
program coordinator and the dean of the School of 
Graduate Studies. (The Thesis Proposal Form is available 
for download on the School of Graduate Studies Web 
page.) This form must be completed and signed in order 
for students to register for the appropriate research course, 
which is always the departmental XXXX 502 or PSYC 504 
Research course. Students must register for at least six 
credits of XXXX 502, but the credits can be broken into 
smaller credit segments and taken over multiple semesters, 
particularly if students need a full academic year to write 
their theses. Otherwise, students can register for the full six 
credits during one semester. 

3) After students obtain the necessary signatures, they then 
take the theses proposal forms to the Registrar's Office to 
register for the XXXX 502 or PSYC 504 Research course. 

4) Students who have registered for the XXXX 502 or PSYC 
504 Research course and do not complete their theses in a 
semester will receive an Incomplete, which will be changed 



to a letter grade by the theses committee chairpersons once 
the theses are completed. 

5) When the theses are written and fully approved by the three 
members of the theses committees, the chairpersons and 
readers sign the "approval page" of the thesis, which are 
placed in the text of the manuscripts. 

6) The theses committee chairpersons will acquaint graduate 
students with the manuscript form and style used in 
their respective disciplines; graduate students writing 
theses should examine recent theses in their academic 
departments. 

7) Students must provide the School of Graduate Studies with 
a minimum of four copies of the theses to be bound: one for 
the Maxwell Library, one for the School of Graduate Studies, 
one for the students' academic department and one for the 
student. (Sometimes departments request an additional 
bound copy.) Students may also request additional bound 
copies of their theses. 



8) Copies of completed manuscripts must be brought to the 
School of Graduate Studies, which will arrange for the bind- 
ing of the copies. A charge of $ 1 2 for each copy will be paid 
by the graduate students. Students pick up their bound cop- 
ies in the School of Graduate Studies. 

9) Theses must be submitted to the School of Graduate 
Studies before students are approved for graduation. 

1 0) The Maxwell Library, which will catalog all theses, acts as 
the official archive for all theses written as part of gradu- 
ate-degree programs at Bridgewater State College. 



TRANSFER CREDIT 

Transfer credit at the graduate level is defined by the School of 
Graduate Studies at Bridgewater State College to include two 
distinct credit situations. First, transfer credit is defined as being 
any appropriate graduate credit taken at Bridgewater State 
College prior to acceptance into a Bridgewater State College 
graduate program. This credit includes appropriate graduate 
credit earned in courses in which the student is enrolled at the 
time of acceptance. Second, transfer credit is defined to include 
appropriate graduate credit taken at an accredited institution 
other than Bridgewater State College prior to or after acceptance 
into a Bridgewater State College graduate program. 

The School of Graduate Studies limits the total number of 
graduate transfer credits to six in programs of fewer than 40 
credits. In programs requiring 40 or more graduate credits, 
students may request to transfer up to nine graduate credits. 
This limit of transfer credits includes courses taken at 
Bridgewater State College before acceptance and/or 
graduate courses taken at other accredited institu- 
tions before or after acceptance. It should be noted, 
however, that not more than six graduate credits, taken both 
prior to and after acceptance, can be transferred from other 
graduate schools (students should make every attempt to enroll 
in Bridgewater State College graduate courses). These credits 
include any credits earned in courses in which students are 
enrolled at the time of acceptance. It does not include prerequi- 
sites. Program exceptions are noted in the appropriate depart- 
ment sections of this catalog. 

Approval of transfer credit is subject to the following condi- 
tions: 1) that not more than six credits being transferred are from 
an accredited institution other than Bridgewater State College; 2) 
that a grade of B or better has been earned in all courses being 
transferred; 3) that courses being transferred have not been used 
to fulfill the requirements of another degree or certificate; and 4) 
that graduate transfer credits may not be more than six years old 
at the time program requirements are completed. 

All courses to be used as transfer credit in a graduate program 
must have the approval of the students' advisers and graduate 
program coordinators prior to submitting for final approval to the 
School of Graduate Studies. Transfer credit should also be prop- 
erly recorded on the students' Graduate Program Proposal forms. 
An official transcript of courses taken at another accredited insti- 
tution must be on file in the School of Graduate Studies. 
I 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



B<sC 

HKIIX.I »MIK 

STATE COU-fct,fc 



School of Graduate Studies 



BSC has two forms used for acceptance of transfer credit. 
The Prematriculation Transfer Credit form is for courses being 
requested to transfer from within Bridgewater State College 
The Graduate Transfer Credit Approval form is for courses being 
requested to transfer from an accredited institution ofner than 
Bridgewater State College Blank copies of both forms are sent to 
students in their acceptance packages by the School of Graduate 
Studies. Students are strongly urged to process their forms for 
transfer credit early in their graduate program. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM COURSES 

Students may withdraw from courses following the drop/add 
period if they submit a Course Withdrawal Form to the Registrar's 
Office by the appropriate semester deadline date, which is 
posted at www.bridgew.edu/registrar/dropaddwithdraw.dm.The 
Course Withdrawal Form must be signed by the course instruc- 
tor. Students should discuss any course withdrawal with their 
advisers. If graduate students fall below full-time status after 
withdrawing from a course, they should be aware that eligibility 
for some sources of financial aid and health insurance may 
be affected. 

The course withdrawal schedule is as follows: 

• The withdrawal period for 1 5-week semester courses ends 
the weekday following the completion of the tenth week of 
the semester. 

• The withdrawal period for seven-week courses ends the 
weekday following the completion of the fifth week of 
the quarter. 

• The withdrawal period for five-week courses ends the 
weekday following the completion of the third week of 
the session. 

• The withdrawal period for 10-week summer courses ends 
the weekday following the completion of the seventh week 
of the session. 

• The withdrawal period for nonregular courses typically ends 
one weekday following the point when approximately 70 
percent of the course has been completed. Students should 
consult the Registrar's Office for exact deadlines for with- 
drawal from these courses. 

• Students who are taking a course online or off campus must 
meet established deadlines and procedures. 

No withdrawals will be permitted after these deadlines unless 
students can demonstrate that extraordinary circumstances 
have prevented them from withdrawing from the course by the 
published deadline. Course withdrawals will be indicated on stu- 
dents' transcripts with a "W" and will not affect the calculation 
of students' grade point averages. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE 

Students who decide to withdraw from a graduate program 
must notify the School of Graduate Studies of their intentions in 
writing as soon as possible. Students should also consult course 
withdrawal procedures and refund policies indicated elsewhere 
in the catalog. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

MASTER OF ARTS (MA) 

Programs leading to the degree of Master of Arts are offered in 

the following areas: 

English 

Concentration: 
Creative Writing 
Psychology 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING (MAT) 

Programs leading to the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching are 

offered in the following areas: 

Biology 

Creative Arts 

English 

History 

Mathematics 

Music Education 

Physical Science 

Physics 

MASTER OF EDUCATION (MEd) 

Programs leading to the degree of Master of Education are 

offered in the following areas: 

Counseling 

Concentrations: 

Mental Health Counseling 

Mental Health Counseling - Dual License 

School Counseling (PreK-8, 5-12) 

Student Affairs Counseling 

Early Childhood Education 

Educational Leadership 

Elementary Education 

Health Promotion 

Instructional Technology 

PreK-12 Education (For Educators in Non-U. S. settings) 
Reading 

Special Education 

Concentrations: 
Moderate Disabilities 
Severe Disabilities 

MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (MPA) 

The Master of Public Administration degree offers concentrations 
in the following areas: 

Civic and Nonprofit Leadership and Administration 
Sustainable Community Development 



58 



School of Graduate Studies 



bSc 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



MASTER OF SCIENCE (MS) 

Programs leading to the degree of Master of Science are offered 
in the following areas: 

Athletic Training 

Computer Science 

Criminal Justice 

Concentrations: 
Administration of Justice 
Crime and Corrections 

Physical Education 

Concentrations: 

Adapted Physical Education 

Applied Kinesiology 

Human Performance and Health Fitness 

Strength and Conditioning 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT 
(MS) 

The Master of Science in Management degree offers concentra- 
tions in the following areas: 
Accounting 
Marketing 

Organization Development 
Technology Management 

MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK (MSW) 



CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE 
STUDY (CAGS) 

A program leading to the CAGS in Education is offered in the 
following areas: 

Educational Leadership 

Mental Health Counseling 

Reading 

School Counseling 

DOCTOR OF EDUCATION (EdD) 

A collaborative CAGS/EdD program is offered in the areas of 
Educational Leadership and Reading with the University of 
Massachusetts-Lowell. 



POSTBACCALAUREATE LICENSURE 
PROGRAMS 

Postbaccalaureate licensure programs leading to initial licensure 
are offered in the following areas: 

Early Childhood Education 

Educational Leadership (LEAD) 

Elementary Education 

Health (Health, Family and Consumer Sciences) 
Instructional Technology 



Physical Education 

Secondary Education (Middle School/High School/PreK-12 

Specialist) 
Special Education 

POSTMASTER'S LICENSURE PROGRAMS 

Postmaster's licensure programs are offered in the following 
areas: 

Educational Leadership 
School Counseling 

EDUCATOR LICENSURE 

All candidates for Massachusetts Educator Licensure are 
advised to check with their individual education departments 
or the School of Education and Allied Studies offices regarding 
proposed regulation changes that may have an impact on their 
licensure program. 

Programs designed to lead to the licensure of educators are 
available to qualified persons who have earned a bachelor's 
degree and who are interested in one of the licenses listed. 

To be eligible, individuals must be officially admitted by the 
School of Graduate Studies and the School of Education and 
Allied Studies to an appropriate postbaccalaureate or postmas- 
ter's licensure program or to an appropriate Master of Arts in 
Teaching or Master of Education program. All of the programs 
listed have been approved by the Massachusetts Department 
of Education. 

Specific information regarding programs is provided in this 
catalog under the School of Education and Allied Studies and 
appropriate departmental descriptions. For additional details 
regarding licensure program procedures and requirements, stu- 
dents should contact the appropriate program coordinator. 

Educator Licensure Programs 

Administrator of Special Education (all levels) 

Early Childhood Teacher of Students with or without Disabilities 

(PreK-2) 
Elementary (1-6) 

Instructional Technology (all levels) 
Reading Specialist (all levels) 

School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor (all levels) 

School Business Administrator (all levels) 

School Guidance Counselor (PreK-8) 

School Guidance Counselor (5-12) 

School Principal/Assistant Principal (PreK-6) 

School Principal/Assistant Principal (5-8) 

School Principal/Assistant Principal (9-12) 

Superintendent/Assistant Superintendent (all levels) 

Supervisor/Director (all levels) 

Teacher of Biology (5-8) 

Teacher of Biology (8-12) 

Teacher of Chemistry (5-8) 

Teacher of Chemistry (8-12) 

Teacher of Dance (all levels) 

Teacher of Earth Science (5-8) 

Teacher of Earth Science (8-12) 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



59 



School of Graduate Studies 



Teacher of English (5-8) 
Teacher of English (8-12) 

Teacher of Health, Family and Consumer Sciences (all levels) 

Teacher of History (5 8) 

Teacher of History (8-12) 

Teacher of Mathematics (5-8) 

Teacher of Mathematics (8-12) 

Teacher of Music (all levels) 

Teacher of Physical Education (PreK-8) 

Teacher of Physical Education (5-12) 

Teacher of Physics (5-8) 

Teacher of Physics (8-12) 

Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8) 
Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities (5-12) 
Teacher of Students with Severe Disabilities (all levels) 
Teacher of Theater (all levels) 
Teacher of Visual Art (PreK-8) 
Teacher of Visual Art (5-12) 

Note: All graduate students seeking licensure and enrolling in 
upper-level courses in the School of Education and Allied Studies 
must be officially accepted by the School of Graduate Studies and 
the School of Education and Allied Studies. 

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 

Graduate certificate programs are available for students who 
are interested in obtaining certain basic skills and competencies 
in a particular area of study. Admission to graduate certificate 
programs is limited to students who have an earned baccalaure- 
ate degree. Courses completed in graduate certificate programs 
may be applied to degree programs as long as they satisfy certain 
transfer guidelines. 

Graduate certificate programs are offered in the following 
areas: 
Accounting 
Finance 

Information Systems Management 
Instructional Technology 
Management 
Marketing Management 

Women's and Gender Studies (see the "Interdisciplinary and 
Preprofessional Programs"section of this catolog for addi- 
tional information) 

For application materials and information on graduate cer- 
tificate programs, contact the School of Graduate Studies at 
508.531.1300. 



GRADUATE ADMISSION 



ADMISSION STANDARDS 



POSTBACCALAUREATE LICENSURE 
PROGRAM 

Students seeking admission to a postbaccalaureate initial licen- 
sure program must hold a bachelor's degree from a four-year 

institution of acceptable standing. 

Applicants must meet the following criteria in order to be 
admitted by the School of Graduate Studies and School of 
Education and Allied Studies: 

• A 2.8 undergraduate GPA. 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation. At least one 
letter of recommendation should be an academic reference 
from a professor. 

• A qualifying score on the Communication and Literacy Skills 
portion of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure 1 
(MTEL). 

• Official transcripts of undergraduate and graduate course 
work. 

Please note that admission decisions to postbaccalaureate 
programs are made on a rolling basis when applications are 
submitted within a reasonable time frame prior to the start of an 
academic semester. 

Candidates who are applying for licenses in fields in which 
they did not major are subject to a review of their course back- 
grounds in the license areas; additional courses may be required 
in the content areas. 

ACCELERATED POSTBACCALAUREATE 
LICENSURE PROGRAM (APB) 

Students seeking admission to the accelerated postbaccalaureate 
initial licensure program must hold a bachelor's degree from a 
four-year institution of acceptable standing. Candidates for the 
APB program will be admitted by the School of Graduate Studies 
based upon the recommendation of the APB coordinator. The 
coordinator will base the admission recommendation on the can- 
didate's potential to be an effective teacher based upon multiple 
indicators including, but not limited to, the following: 

• A 2.8 undergraduate GPA. 

• Content competence demonstrated by a passing score on the 
subject matter test portion of the Massachusetts Tests for 
Educator Licensure* (MTEL). 

Note: Candidates who are applying for a license in a field in 
which they did not major are subject to a review of their course 
background in the license area; additional content courses may 
be required to be completed prior to admission. 

• A qualifying score on the Communication and Literacy Skills 
portion of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® 
(MTEL). 



School of Graduate Studies 



• Resume. 

• Experience with youth at the licensure level. 

• Official transcripts of undergraduate and graduate course 
work. 

Applicants to the Accelerated Postbaccalaureate (APB) 
licensure program should refer to the "Secondary Education 
and Professional Programs" section of this catalog for 
admission criteria. 



MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING (MAT) 

Students seeking admission to the Master of Arts in Teaching 
degree program must hold a bachelor's degree from a four-year 
institution of acceptable standing. The MAT program is designed 
for high school and middle school teachers who have an 
initial license and are seeking a professional license in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Applicants must meet the 
following criteria in order to be admitted by the School of 
Graduate Studies: 

• A 2.75 undergraduate GPA based upon four years of course 
work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon course work 
completed during the junior and senior years. 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test. 

• An initial teaching license. 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation (at least two 
letters of recommendation should be from professors and the 
third letter of recommendation could be from a professional 
employer). 

• Applicants not holding a bachelor's degree in the content 
area being pursued for the MAT are subject to a transcript 
review by the academic department to determine whether 
additional content course work will be required as program 
prerequisites. 



MASTER'S DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Please note that a number of graduate programs (including 
counseling, criminal justice, management, psychology, public 
administration, social work and certain education programs) 
have additional admission requirements, which are outlined in 
the appropriate departmental sections of this catalog. 

Students seeking admission to a program leading to a mas- 
ter's degree must hold a bachelor's degree from a four-year insti- 
tution of acceptable standing. (College seniors may be admitted 
on a conditional basis, pending receipt of their degree.) Master's 
degree applicants must meet the following criteria in order to 
receive a "clear admit" (full graduate student status): 

• A 2.75 undergraduate GPA based upon four years of course 
work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon course work 
completed in the junior and senior years. 

• A 2.8 undergraduate GPA based upon four years of course 
work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon course work 
completed in the junior and senior years for programs lead- 
ing to initial licensure. 



• Most programs require a composite score of 900 on the 
quantitative and verbal parts of the GRE General Test. Please 
consult the appropriate departmental section of the catalog. 
The Master of Science in Management program requires a 
GMAT score of 450 or higher. 

• A rating of 1 (on part IV) on three letters of recommendation 
(1 being the highest rating on the scale). At least two letters 
of recommendation should be academic references from pro- 
fessors and the third letter of recommendation could be from 
a professional employer. 

• Candidates for education programs leading to initial licensure 
need to provide a qualifying score on the Communication 
and Literacy Skills portion of the Massachusetts Tests for 
Educator Licensure® (MTEL). Some programs may require 
additional MTEL®test(s). Please refer to the appropriate 
departmental section of this catalog. 

Applicants who do not meet the "clear admit" status will be 
considered for a "conditional acceptance" if they meet the fol- 
lowing criteria: 

• A 2.5 undergraduate GPA based upon four years of course 
work or a 2.75 undergraduate GPA based upon course work 
completed during the junior and senior years. 

• A composite score of 600 to 899 on the quantitative and 
verbal parts of the GRE General Test. 

• A rating of least 2 (on part IV) on three letters of recommen- 
dation (1 being the highest rating on the scale). At least two 
letters of recommendation should be academic references 
from professors and the third letter of recommendation could 
be from a professional employer. 

• Candidates for education programs leading to initial licensure 
need to provide a qualifying score on the Communication 
and Literacy Skills portion of the Massachusetts Tests for 
Educator Licensure® (MTEL). Some programs may require 

additional MTEL®test(s). Please refer to the appropriate 
departmental section of this catalog. 

• There is not "conditional acceptance" status for applicants 
seeking admission to the MEd degree program in early 
childhood education and elementary education leading to 
initial licensure. 

Conditions that must be met to move from conditional to full 
graduate student status include: 

• Students must meet with their advisers who will recommend 
three graduate courses that must be taken at Bridgewater 
State College after conditional admission to the program. 

• Students must attain a GPA of at least 3.0 after completion 
of the three required courses. 

If students attain a GPA of at least 3.0 after completing the 
courses, they will be moved to full graduate student status. If 
students do not earn a GPA of at least 3.0 after completing the 
courses, they will be subject to academic dismissal. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



bSc 

BRIDGEWATER 

STATE COLLBGE 



School of Graduate Studies 



CAGS AND POSTMASTER'S LICENSURE 
PROGRAMS 

Students seeking admission to a postmaster's program must hold 
a master's degree from an accredited institution and must meet 
the following criteria in order to be admitted by the School of 
Graduate Studies: 

• A graduate GPA of 3.0. 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation (at least two 
letters of recommendation should be from professors and the 
third letter of recommendation could be from a professional 
employer). 

• Candidates for education programs leading to initial licen- 
sure need to provide qualifying scores on the Communication 
and Literacy Skills portion of the Massachusetts Tests for 
Educator Licensure' 1 " (MTEL). 

APPLICATION PROCEDURES 

For most programs, the School of Graduate Studies admits stu- 
dents for the fall and spring semesters and summer sessions of 
each year. An application is not complete unless all of the appro- 
priate documents have been received by the School of Graduate 
Studies on or before the appropriate application deadline: 

Feb. 1 Social Work fall semester admission 



Summer session admission 
Psychology fall semester admission 
Counselor Education fall semester admission 



Feb. 15 
March 1 
March 1 

May 1 5 Fall semester admission 

Oct. 1 Spring semester admission 

Oct. 1 Counselor Education spring semester admission 

Postbaccalaureate and accelerated postbaccalaureate programs 
have "rolling admission," accepting applications at any time, 
within a reasonable time frame prior to the start of an academic 
semester or session. 

Applicants who have questions regarding graduate applica- 
tion procedures and deadlines should contact the School of 
Graduate Studies at 508.53 1 . 1 300. It is the responsibility of 
graduate students to make certain that all application documents 
are received on time. Applicants should indicate a specific degree 
or licensure program (and also the area of study) when they 
request application forms. 

Certain programs require a formal interview with the gradu- 
ate program coordinator. Please consult the department require- 
ments presented in this catalog. 

Applicants to a graduate program should make certain that 
the material listed below is on file in the School of Graduate 
Studies. Application forms with fee payments and all other cor- 
respondence and application material should be sent to: 

Bridgewater State College 
School of Graduate Studies 
Maxwell Library - Room 019 
Bridgewater, MA 02325 



An application is not complete unless all of the appropriate 
documents listed below have been received by the School of 

Graduate Studies. 

1) Graduate application form and application fee 

Graduate students should send the completed application form 
and application fee of S50 to the School of Graduate Studies to 
begin the admissions application process. (The application fee 
for the Accelerated Postbaccalaureate (APB) licensure program is 
S 1 00.) Checks for the application fee should be made payable to 
Bridgewater State College. 

2) Official transcripts of all undergraduate and 
graduate course work 

Official transcripts must be sent directly to the School of 
Graduate Studies and must bear the seal and/or stamp of the 
issuing college or university. Copies of transcripts and transcripts 
marked "Issued to Student" are not acceptable. Applicants 
who have attended more than one undergraduate institution 
and/or graduate school should arrange to have transcripts of all 
course work, including grade results, from each school attended 
sent directly to the School of Graduate Studies. Graduates of 
Bridgewater State College and persons who have taken nonde- 
gree credit at the college may attach a copy of their transcript 
printed from InfoBear. All BSC transcripts will be verified. 

Applicants who have successfully completed graduate 
courses, as well as those who hold a degree(s) in addition to the 
baccalaureate, must fulfill all application requirements as set 
forth in the college catalog. The successful completion of gradu- 
ate courses prior to application shall not obligate the academic 
department or the School of Graduate Studies to recommend an 
applicant for acceptance. 

3) Letters of recommendation 

Three letters of recommendation are required for all programs, 
with the exception of the APB program, which requires no letters 
of recommendation. 

Candidates for the master's degree in counselor education 
should consult that program's section of this catalog for specific 
instruction about letters of recommendation. 

Forms for recommendations are available from the School 
of Graduate Studies. In general, only letters of recommendation 
submitted on these forms and sent by the reference directly to 
the School of Graduate Studies will be accepted. These letters 
provide an estimate of applicants' abilities to successfully pursue 
programs in their proposed fields or concentrations. For MAT and 
MEd applicants, at least two letters must be from faculty who 
have taught the applicants at the collegiate level (undergraduate 
or graduate). The third letter may be from appropriate employers 
or school administrators for whom the applicants have taught. 
For MA and MS applicants, at least two letters must be from 
people who have taught the applicants in the appropriate areas 
of concentration. The third MA and MS letter may be from fac- 
ulty members who have taught the applicants at the collegiate 
level or from appropriate employers or school administrators for 
whom the applicants have taught. 



62 



School of Graduate Studies 



B)SC 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



4) Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 

For those programs requiring the GRE as an admission require- 
ment, students are required to submit the results of the General 
Test. Applicants must arrange to have their official score report 
sent directly from the Educational Testing Service to the School 
of Graduate Studies. Bridgewater State College's CEEB code is 
3517. Photocopies and scores submitted by applicants are not 
acceptable. Information relative to the GRE may be obtained 
from the School of Graduate Studies or www.gre.org. Students 
who have earned a master's degree are exempt from the 
GRE requirement. 

5) Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) 

Master of Science in Management applicants are required to 
submit GMAT scores. Applicants must arrange to have an official 
score report sent directly from the Educational Testing Service 
to the School of Graduate Studies. Bridgewater State College's 
CEEB code is 3517. Photocopies and scores submitted by appli- 
cants are not acceptable. Information pertaining to the GMAT 
may be obtained from the School of Graduate Studies or www. 
mba.com. Students who have earned a master's degree are 
exempt from the GMAT requirement. 

6) Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 

All applicants from countries where English is not the official 
language also must provide scores from the TOEFL examina- 
tion. Ordinarily, only students with TOEFL scores of 213 from the 
computer-based test, 550 from the paper-based test, or 79-80 on 
the Internet-based test will be considered for admission. 

7) Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® 
(MTEL) 

Applicants must provide a qualifying score on the Communica- 
tion and Literacy Skills portion of the Massachusetts Tests for 
Educator Licensure® (MTEL) as a graduate admission require- 
ment if applying to one of the following education programs: 

• Postbaccalaureate and Accelerated Postbaccalaureate 
(APB) initial teacher licensure programs. (Applicants to the 
Accelerated Postbaccalaureate (APB) program must also 
submit a qualifying score on the appropriate MTEL® subject 
matter test.) 

• MEd and CAGS programs leading to initial administrator 
licensure 

• All MEd programs leading to initial teacher licensure 

• MEd, Postmaster's and CAGS programs leading to initial 
support specialist licensure; e.g., instructional technology 
specialist, school guidance counselor, Teading specialist 

Note: Some programs may require additional MTEL® test(s). 
Please refer to the appropriate departmental section of 
this catalog. 

8) Additional departmental requirements 

There may also be special departmental requirements relative to 
the application, such as an interview. Such requirements, if any, 
are to be found under each department's description of its gradu- 
ate program(s) in this catalog. 



INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ADMISSION 
REQUIREMENTS 

Students applying for admission to a BSC graduate program, 
who plan to come into this country on an F-1 Visa, will need to 
include the following documents with the application and 
application fee: 

• Certified bank/financial statement attesting to the fact 
that funds are available specifically for educational expenses. 
The statement must show sufficient funding for one year of 
college-related costs and living expenses. Presently, BSC 
estimates this amount to be approximately $16,256. 

• Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) 
Score (if necessary, in accordance with English language 
skills). Students for whom English is a second language will 
be required to submit an official copy of results from the 
TOEFL, unless they have at least two years' experience in an 
American college or university. Students must receive a total 
score of 213 from a computer-based test, 550 from a paper- 
based test or 79-80 on the Internet-based test. 

• GRE or GMAT Scores (dependent upon program) 

• Transcripts - All transcripts must be evaluated and 
translated showing equivalence of U. S. baccalaureate 
degree by an agency such as the Center for Educational 
Documentation, Boston, MA (www.cedevaluations.com); 
World Education Services, Inc., New York, NY (www.wes. 
org); or another reputable agency. 

• Three Letters of Recommendation - At least two let- 
ters of recommendation should be academic references from 
professors and the third letter of recommendation could be 
from a professional employer. 

It is strongly suggested that international students submit a 
completed application at least one month prior to the deadline 
in order to have sufficient time to receive an Initial I-20 form 
needed to apply for an F-1 Visa. 



ADMISSION DECISIONS 



ACTION BY THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 

All completed applications are sent by the School of Graduate 
Studies to the academic department in which applicants 
propose to concentrate. After reviewing these applications, 
departments make admission recommendations to the School of 
Graduate Studies. 



ACTION BY THE EDUCATOR LICENSURE 
OFFICE 

All completed applications of applicants seeking licensure are 
sent to the Educator Licensure Office in the School of Education 
and Allied Studies. After reviewing these applications, decisions 
are given to the School of Graduate Studies. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



School of Graduate Studies 



ACTION BY THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE 
STUDIES 

The School of Graduate Studies, after reviewing the recom- 
mendations of the academic department and. if applicable, the 
Educator Licensure Office, notifies applicants of the action taken. 



CHANGE OF PROGRAM 

Any request to change from one graduate program to another 
must be made prior to the deadline for receiving completed 
applications. All requests are subject to departmental approval. 
Students wishing to change programs must complete the change 
of program form. Students seeking to change their program 
must review the admission requirements in this catalog as addi 
tional application materials may be requested by the School of 
Graduate Studies. Appropriate credits earned prior to a program 
change may be transferred to the new graduate program 
with the approval of the new adviser and graduate 
program coordinator. 



GRADUATE ADVISERS AND GRADUATE 
PROGRAM PLANNING 

Graduate students who are accepted are assigned advisers in the 
students' area of study. Students in several programs are required 
to enroll in the program planning course GRPP 501 Graduate 
Program Planning (one graduate credit) as part of the minimum 
credit requirements in their program. Students should consult 
specific program requirements to see if this course is required. 

Students' academic and professional backgrounds and objec- 
tives are considered during the planning and development of 
a coherent program of graduate study. Graduate students who 
have been accepted into a master's degree or CAGS program 
should enroll under the direction of their advisers immediately 
after acceptance by the School of Graduate Studies and prior to 
enrolling in any additional courses. For details, graduate students 
should contact their advisers. 

All accepted graduate students will receive copies of the 
Graduate Program Proposal form from the School of Graduate 
Studies. Students are required to have a completed copy of this 
form sent to the School of Graduate Studies when applying 
to graduate. 



GRADUATE PROGRAM 
REQUIREMENTS 



MASTER OF ARTS 

General Requirements - A minimum of 30 approved gradu- 
ate credits is required for the Master of Arts (MA) degree. All 
credits must have the adviser's endorsement. A thesis is optional 
in Master of Arts programs. For additional details, students 
should consult appropriate departmental sections of the catalog 
for specific program requirements for the degree. 



MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 

The Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree was developed 
for high school and middle school subject area teachers who 
have an initial license and are seeking a professional license in 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Most MAT programs are 
designed to meet the "appropriate master's degree" require- 
ment, which is pan of the criteria for professional-stage licensure, 
as set forth in the most recent MA-DESE licensure regulations. 
This degree program will also appeal to secondary school teach- 
ers who already hold a standard level or professional license and 
want to acquire additional knowledge and a master's degree in 
the discipline 

Students needing initial licensure should refer to the section 
of this catalog titled "Accelerated Postbaccalaureate Program 
(APB): Initial Licensure for Secondary (Subject Areas: 8- 1 2) and 
Middle Level (Subject Areas: 5-8) Teachers." Students seeking 
licensure should also consult the section of this catalog titled 
"School of Education and Allied Studies" for information pertain- 
ing to licensure, admission to and retention in professional edu- 
cation, as well as important institutional deadlines. 

General Requirements - A minimum of 33 approved 
graduate credits is required for the MAT degree, which is 
offered through the Department of Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs and the academic departments of the col- 
lege. For program and course details, students should consult the 
MAT information listed in this catalog under the "Department of 
Secondary Education and Professional Programs" and under the 
appropriate academic department. 



MASTER OF EDUCATION 

The Master of Education (MEd) degree is designed for persons 
with a wide variety of academic and professional objectives. 
Students are encouraged to consult specific MEd program 
descriptions in this catalog. 

General Requirements - A minimum of 30 approved gradu- 
ate credits, depending upon the program, is required for the 
Master of Education degree. For program and course details, 
students should consult the appropriate departmental section 
of this catalog. Degree credits must have the endorsement of 
the adviser. 

Licensure Information - A number of Bridgewater State 
College's Master of Education programs have been approved 
by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary 
Education for the licensure of educational personnel. Specific 
information regarding such programs is provided in this catalog 
under the "School of Education and Allied Studies" and a 
ppropriate departmental program descriptions. For additional 
details regarding certification program procedures and require- 
ments, students should contact the appropriate graduate 
program coordinator. 



64 



School of Graduate Studies 



MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

The Master of Public Administration (MPA) degree provides 
professional education to prepare persons for leadership roles in 
public administration and public affairs. Program details are pro- 
vided in the graduate program section under "Political Science" 
in this catalog. 

General Requirements - A minimum of 39 to 46 
approved graduate credits is required for the Master of Public 
Administration (MPA) degree. The MPA program accommodates 
the needs of both precareer students and in-career profession- 
als by offering alternative program requirements that take into 
account students' academic and professional backgrounds. 



MASTER OF SCIENCE 

General Requirements - A minimum of 30 approved gradu- 
ate credits is required for the Master of Science (MS) degree. All 
credits must have the adviser's endorsement. A thesis is optional 
in certain Master of Science programs. For additional details, 
students should consult appropriate departmental sections of 
the catalog for specific program and course requirements for 
the degree. 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT 

The Master of Science in Management (MS) degree prepares stu- 
dents to apply systems thinking to managerial problems, direct 
large-scale projects, and lead people and organizations through 
complex change. Program details are provided in the "School of 
Business" section of this catalog. 

General Requirements - A minimum of 30 credit hours of 
graduate course work, including a core of five courses, three 
concentration courses, one elective and one capstone course. 
The foundation courses must be taken prior to taking the core or 
concentration courses and may not be used to fulfill the 30-credit 
program requirements. The foundation course requirements can 
be satisfied by completion of approved equivalent undergraduate 
courses: a statistics course, courses in accounting and finance 
for ACFI 505 and courses in marketing and law for MGMT 506. 
Students concentrating in accounting will need additional pre- 
requisites. Accounting students may call 508.531.1395 or e-mail 
afdept@bridgew.edu for more information. 



MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK 

The mission of the Master of Social Work (MSW) program is to 
prepare advanced professional practitioners to address regional 
needs, promote social justice, and enhance the strength and resil- 
ience of communities, families and individuals. Program details 
are provided in the "Social Work" section of this catalog. 

General Requirements - A minimum of 62 approved gradu- 
ate credits is required for the Master of Social Work (MSW) 
degree. Students enrolled in the MSW program for advanced 
standing are required to complete a minimum of 35 approved 
graduate credits. 



CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE 
STUDY 

General Requirements - A minimum of 30 approved gradu- 
ate credits is required for the Certificate of Advanced Graduate 
Study program. Courses taken for the CAGS may not repeat work 
previously accomplished by students in either their undergradu- 
ate or graduate degree work. At least one-half of the CAGS cred- 
its must be earned in courses limited to postmaster's students 
(600-level). 

Currently, the college offers a program leading to a Certificate 
of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) in Education with concen- 
trations in counseling, educational leadership and reading. For 
details, students should consult the counselor education, educa- 
tional leadership and reading program sections of this catalog. 



COLLABORATIVE CAGS/EdD PROGRAM 

There is a transfer agreement between Bridgewater State 
College, which offers the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study 
(CAGS) (see above), and the University of Massachusetts-Lowell, 
which offers the Doctor of Education (EdD) degree. Further pro- 
gram information is provided in the "School of Education and 
Allied Studies" section of this catalog. 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



65 



School of Arts and Sciences 



Anthropology 
Art 

Biological Sciences 
Chemical Sciences 
Communication Studies 
Criminal Justice 
Earth Sciences 
English 

Foreign Languages 

Geography 

History 

Mathematics and Computer Science 

Music 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Science 
Psychology 
Social Work 
Sociology 
Theater and Dance 



Dr Rita Miller 

Acting Dean, School of Arts and Sciences 
Dr. Jeffrey Williams 

Acting Associate Dean, School of Arts and Sciences 



ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS 

Anthropology 

Dr. Curtiss Hoffman, Chairperson 

Art 

Professor Dorothy Pulsifer, Chairperson 
Biological Sciences 

Dr. Jeffery Bowen, Chairperson 
Chemical Sciences 

Dr. Edward Brush, Chairperson 
Communication Studies 

Dr. Jabbar Al-Obaidi, Chairperson 
Criminal Justice 

Dr. Carolyn Petrosino, Chairperson 
Earth Sciences 

Dr. Michael Krol, Chairperson 
English 

Dr. John Kucich, Chairperson 
Foreign Languages 

Dr. Fernanda Ferreira, Chairperson 
Geography 

Dr. Sandra Clark, Chairperson 
History 

Dr. Leonid Heretz, Chairperson 
Mathematics and Computer Science 

Dr. Uma Shama, Chairperson 
Music 

Dr. Salil Sachdev, Chairperson 
Philosophy 

Dr. Aeon Skoble, Chairperson 
Physics 

Dr. Martina Arndt, Chairperson 
Po//f/ca/ Science 

Dr. George Serra, Chairperson 
Psychology 

Dr. Jonathan Holmes, Chairperson 
Social Work 

Dr. Spencer Zeiger, Chairperson 
Sociology 

Dr. Patricia Fanning, Chairperson 
Theater and Dance 

Professor Henry Shaffer, Chairperson 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



School of Arts and Sciences 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 

The School of Arts and Sciences offers undergraduate programs 
leading to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree 
in the areas listed below. Listed beneath each department are 
the concentrations it offers. Concentrations are programs of 
study within the major with their own subset of requirements. 
Only students selecting the major field of study may complete a 
concentration within that major. The completed concentration is 
indicated on the student's transcript. 



Anthropology 

Cultural Anthropology 
General Anthropology 
Public Archaeology 

Art 

Art Education 

Art History 

Crafts 

Fine Arts 

Graphic Design 

Photography 

Biology 

Biomedical/Molecular 
Biology 

Environmental Biology 

General Biology 
Chemistry 

Biochemistry 

Environmental Chemistry 

Professional Chemistry 

Chemistry-Geology 

Communications Studies 

Corporate Communication 
Individualized 
Media Studies and 
Communication 
Technologies 
Speech Communication 

Computer Science 

Criminal Justice 

Earth Sciences 

General 

Environmental 

Geosciences 

Geology 
English 

English Education (High 
School, Middle School) 

Writing 
Geography 



History 

Military History 
Mathematics 
Music 

Music Education 
Philosophy 

Applied Ethics 
Physics 

General Physics 

Professional Physics 
Political Science 

American Politics 

International Affairs 

Legal Studies 

Public Administration 
Psychology 

Child Psychology 

Industrial and 
Organizational 
Psychology 

Medical and Health 
Psychology 
Social Work 
Sociology 

City, Community 
and Region 

Education 

Global Studies 
Spanish 

Theater and Dance 
Dance Education 
Theater Arts 
Theater Education 



BACHELOR OF ARTS/BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE 

The Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degree programs 
allow students to select from a number of areas and provide 
preparation for high school teaching (if secondary education 
is elected as a minor), graduate school and fields of endeavor 
related to the major area of study. 

The decision as to whether to award the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts or the degree of Bachelor of Science shall be consistent with 
the standards in the student's major field as determined by the 
major department. 

In cases where students with double majors are eligible for 
a BA, BS and/or BSE degree, the student will select which major 
department will make the decision regarding which degree the 
student will be awarded. 

Students are advised to consult with their department chair- 
person or major adviser early in their academic career, but not 
later than the end of the sophomore year, in order to select a 
major and to be certain that course selection will allow gradua- 
tion with the desired degree. 

Students should be aware that not all courses are offered in 
the evening. Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm 
or after should consult the appropriate department chairperson 
for information about the availability of evening sections of 
courses required in a specific major, concentration and/or minor. 

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

In the School of Arts and Sciences the following minors in specific 
disciplines or interdisciplinary areas are offered: 



Actuarial Science 
American Studies 
Anthropology 
Art 

Art History 

Asian Studies 

Biochemistry 

Biology 

Biotechnology 

Canadian Studies 

Chemistry 

Civic Education and 

Community Leadership 
Communication Studies 
Computer Science 
Criminal Justice 
Dance 

Earth Sciences 
English 

Environmental Biology 
Ethnic Studies 
Forensic Psychology 
Geography 
Geophysics 



History 

Irish-American Studies 
Latin American and 

Caribbean Studies 
Mathematics 
Middle East Studies 
Music 
Philosophy 
Physics 

Political Science 
Portuguese 
Psychology 
Public History 
Public Relations 
Russian and East 

European Studies 
Social Welfare 
Sociology 
Spanish 
Theater Arts 
Urban Affairs 

Women's and Gender Studies 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edulcatalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



67 



School of Arts and Sciences 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Graduate programs leading to the Master of Arts, Master of Arts 
in Teaching, Master of Public Administration, Master of Science 
and Master of Social Work degrees are offered in the following 

fields: 

Master of Arts 

English 

Concenfraf/on. 

Creative Writing 
Psychology 

Master of Arts in Teaching 

Biology 

Creative Arts 

English 

History 

Mathematics 

Music 

Physical Science 
Physics 

Master of Public Administration 

Concentrations: 

Civil and Nonprofit Leadership and Administration 
Sustainable Community Development 

Master of Science 

Computer Science 
Criminal Justice 

Master of Social Work 

Additional information regarding graduate programs, includ- 
ing application procedures and academic requirements, may 
be found in the "School of Graduate Studies" and appropriate 
departmental sections of this catalog. 

DEPARTMENTAL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

See the "Course Descriptions" section of this catalog for 
departmental course descriptions. 




68 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Anthropology 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Professor Curtiss Hoffman 

Professor: Sandra Faiman-Silva 

Associate Professors: Diana Fox, Ellen Ingmanson 

Assistant Professor: Louise Badiane 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1799 
Location: Burrill Office Complex 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/Anthro 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BA in Anthropology 

Concentrations: Cultural Anthropology, General 
Anthropology 

• BS in Anthropology 
Concentration: Public Archaeology 

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• Anthropology 

The department provides a strong liberal arts curriculum aimed 
at developing well-rounded, informed citizens with strong criti- 
cal thinking abilities. Department programs also impart skills to 
students, preparing them for a wide range of professions. The 
department encourages students to continue on to 
graduate study. 

Many department faculty members engage in research 
and the department encourages student-faculty collaborative 
research. Students may also carry out internships. The public 
archeology concentration requires that students participate in 
fieldwork or laboratory work, and the department offers a sum- 
mer archaeological field school. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF ARTS/BACHELOR 
OF SCIENCE 

Anthropology, the scientific study of humankind, allows students 
to build cross-cultural understandings through an intensive 
study of other cultures. Anthropology is traditionally divided into 
several subfields: cultural anthropology, archaeology, physical (or 
biological) anthropology, applied anthropology and linguistics. A 
major in anthropology provides students with an understanding 
of societies and cultures throughout the world. Students major- 
ing in anthropology are prepared to understand and work with 
individuals from other cultural settings; in health care, social 
services and public welfare agencies; or as teachers, museum 
curators, environmentalists, or in private industry. Students may 
select a BA in cultural anthropology or general anthropology, or a 
BS in public archaeology. Students may also combine a major in 
anthropology with an education major. 



CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 
CONCENTRATION 

Students taking the cultural anthropology concentration are 
introduced to three of the five anthropology subfields along 
with upper-division area studies and topically focused courses. 
Cultural anthropology uses a comparative, cross-cultural method 
to understand human culture and its variations. Cultural anthro- 
pologists draw on quantitative and qualitative data in their 
research, based on firsthand participant observation fieldwork 
and interviews. 



PUBLIC ARCHAEOLOGY CONCENTRATION 

The public archaeology concentration provides the basic knowl- 
edge and training necessary for careers in contract archaeology 
and to the study of federal, state and local legislation protecting 
archaeological resources. The concentration relies heavily on cog- 
nate courses in geology and geography. 



GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY 
CONCENTRATION 

The general anthropology concentration introduces students 
to four of anthropology's major subfields: cultural, biological, 
archaeological and applied anthropology. This concentration will 
expose students to a thorough understanding of the breadth 
and depth of anthropology, with an opportunity to see how 
anthropological ideas and methods are used to address human 
problems. Students will be well prepared to bring anthropologi- 
cal skills to the workplace or to enter a broad-based graduate 
program in anthropology. 



ANTHROPOLOGY MAJOR 



CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY 
CONCENTRATION Credits 

ANTH 100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 

ANTH 101 Biological Anthropology 3 

ANfH 103 Introduction to Archaeology 3 

ANTH 400 Seminar: Anthropological Theory 

(Writing Intensive in the Major Core 

Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) 3 

ANTH 401 Research Methods in Anthropology 3 

Note: LANG 300 Languages of the World may be substituted for 

ANTH 101 or ANTH 103 
Plus one course in a culture area from 3 

ANTH 206 Native Cultures of North America 

ANTH 209 Peoples and Cultures of Africa 

ANTH 213 Latin American Peoples and Cultures 

ANTH 215 The Caribbean 

ANTH 216 People and Cultures of the Near East 



Plus 15 additional credits in anthropology courses, at least 12 of 
which must be at the 300 level or above. Students may take up 
to three credits in archaeology or biological anthropology at the 

300 level or above as part of this concentration 15 

Total minimum credits: 33 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Anthropology 



Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 



PUBLIC ARCHAEOLOGY 

CONCENTRATION Credits 

ANTH 100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 

ANTH 101 Biological Anthropology 3 

ANTH 103 Introduction to Archaeology 3 

ANTH 206 Native Cultures of North America 3 

ANTH 328 Archaeology of North America 3 

ANTH 400 Seminar: Anthropological Theory 
(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 

Requirement-CWRM) 3 

ANTH 410 Public Archaeology 3 

Plus nine credits of field or laboratory work in archaeology 
(any combination of ANTH 303, ANTH 332, ANTH 405 and 

Directed Study or Internship) 9 

Plus three additional credits in anthropology 3 

Cognate Requirements 

MATH 110 Elementary Statistics I 3 

or 

ANTH 401 Research Methods in Anthropology 
or 

GEOG 315 Quantitative Geography 

EASC 100 Physical Geology 4 

Plus four courses from 12 

EASC 101 Historical Geology 

EASC 194 Environmental Geology 

EASC 370 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy 

EASC 480 Remote Sensing 



GEOG 213 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) I 
GEOG 317 Air Photo Interpretation-Remote Sensing 
GEOG 332 Management and Preservation of the Natural 

Environment 
INTD 350 Soil Identification and Interpretation 
Or other cognates deemed appropriate by the department 

Total minimum credits: 52 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 



GENERAL ANTHROPOLOGY 
CONCENTRATION Credits 

ANTH 100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 

ANTH 101 Biological Anthropology 3 

ANTH 103 Introduction to Archaeology 3 

ANTH 400 Seminar: Anthropological Theory 

(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 

Requirement-CWRM) 3 

Plus one course in a culture area from 3 

ANTH 206 Native Cultures of North America 

ANTH 209 Peoples and Cultures of Africa 



ANTH 213 Latin American Peoples and Cultures 

ANTH 215 The Caribbean 

ANTH 216 Peoples and Cultures of the Near East 

ANTH 319 Contemporary Native Americans 

ANTH 409 Mesoamerican Societies and Cultures 
Plus nine additional elective credits in anthropology, at least six 
of which must be at upper division level (300-400), one in 
each of the three subdisciplines below 9 

Cultural 

ANTH 305 Culture Change 

ANTH 307 Anthropology of Religion 

ANTH 308 Anthropology of Education 

ANTH 309 Anthropology of Art 

ANTH 314 Women in Myth and Lore 

ANTH 315 Ethnic Experience in America 

ANTH 319 Contemporary Native Americans 

ANTH 322 War, Peace and Culture 

ANTH 330 Medical Anthropology 

ANTH 331 Political Anthropology 

ANTH 340 Myths and Peoples of the Ancient Near East 

ANTH 399 Special Topics in Anthropology, as appropriate 

ANTH 404 Seminar: Culture and Consciousness 

ANTH 409 Mesoamerican Societies and Cultures 

ANTH 417 Seminar: She/He "Two Spirits" Gender Cross- 
Culturally 

ANTH 420 Visual Anthropology 

ANTH 426 Seminar: New England Ethnic and Regional 
Communities 

ANTH 435 Seminar: Global Feminism 

Biological 

ANTH 399 Special Topics in Anthropology, as appropriate 
ANTH 405 Forensic Anthropology 

Archaeology 

ANTH 303 Archaeological Field Excavation in Prehistoric Sites 

in New England 
ANTH 328 Archaeology of North America 
ANTH 332 Practicum in Field Archaeology (3 credits) 
ANTH 399 Special Topics in Anthropology, as appropriate 
ANTH 410 Public Archaeology 

Plus three additional, three-credit electives in anthropology, 



two of which must be upper division level 

(300 and above) 9 

Plus one, three-credit research or applied course from the 
list below: 3 



70 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Anthropology 



ANTH 303 Archaelogical Field Excavation in Prehistoric 

Sites in New England 
ANTH 332 Practicum in Field Archaeology 
ANTH 355 Anthropological Study Tour 
ANTH 405 Forensic Anthropology 
ANTH 485 Honors Thesis 
ANTH 498 Field Experience in Anthropology 

Cognate Requirements 

Research methods course (choose one) 3 

GEOG 315 Quantitative Geography 

MATH 110 Elementary Statistics I 

ANTH 401 Research Methods in Anthropology 

Foreign Language Requirement 

A two-semester sequence of an introductory foreign language 

or its equivalent 6 

Total minimum credits: 45 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 

DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION OR SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major in anthropology and ele- 
mentary education, early childhood education or special educa- 
tion for licensure purposes. Appropriate advising materials with 
suggested course sequences are available. 

ANTHROPOLOGY MINOR 

Anthropology minors are advised to take Credits 
following courses: 

Any two of the following 6 

ANTH 100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 

ANTH 101 Biological Anthropology 

ANTH 103 Introduction to Archaeology 
Plus any one of the following 3 

ANTH 206 Native Cultures of North America 

ANTH 208 Anthropology of Women 

ANTH 209 Peoples and Cultures of Af rica 

ANTH 213 Latin American Peoples and Cultures 

ANTH 215 The Caribbean 

ANTH 216 Peoples and Cultures of the Near East 

Plus 12 additional credits in anthropology 12 

Total minimum credits: 21 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



71 



BRIPCEWATER 
M AI » ( i >l I I (.1 



FACULTY 

Chairperson and Graduate Program Coordinator: 

Professor Dorothy Pulsifer 

Professors: Roger Dunn, Mercedes Nunez 

Associate Professors: Jeffrey Asmus, Rob Lorenson, 
Brenda Molife. Magaly Ponce, Beatrice St. Laurent 

Assistant Professors: Leigh Craven, Mary Dondero, 
Ivana George, John Hooker, Robert Saunders III, 
Donald Tarallo 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1359 
Location: Art Building, Room 100 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/art 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BA in Art 

Concentrations: Art Education, Art History, Crafts, Fine Arts, 
Graphic Design, Photography 

• MAT - Creative Arts 



UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• Art 

• Art History 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The Department of Art offers six concentrations: 

Art Education 

Art History 

Crafts 

Fine Arts 

Graphic Design 

Photography 

The undergraduate program offers a broad-based training in the 
visual arts. In addition to course work, internships give firsthand 
experience in such areas as graphic design, museology, exhibi- 
tion planning and community art programs. Students planning 
to pursue graduate study at some point in their careers should 
work closely with their advisers to select appropriate course work 
beyond the 36-hour requirements of the major, thus earning 
themselves a competitive edge in the application process at the 
graduate level. 

Students interested in teaching art must select a minor in 
secondary education. However, state-mandated requirements 
for teacher training are subject to change, so it is necessary to 
consult with Professor Dorothy Pulsifer regarding up-to-date 
requirements. Prospective teachers of art are encouraged to join 
the student chapter of the National Art Education Association. 

Art majors not interested in an education minor are encour- 
aged to select a minor complementing their interests within the 
major. Students who are not art majors, wishing to minor in art 
or art history, will find a diversity of course offerings suitable to 



their interests and skills. To ensure an appropriate selection of art 
courses in the major or minor, it is important that each student 
work closely with his or her art adviser or the department chair- 
person in program selection. 

A student majoring in art must achieve a grade of "C-" or bet- 
ter in all of the required courses within the art program, repeat- 
ing courses if necessary to achieve the required grade. 

Students should be aware that typically there are additional 
hours outside of class to complete course requirements and 
expenses for materials and tools in studio courses beyond the 
required fees. Field trips to museums, studios and commercial 
galleries in the region, in New York City and at other sites are 
regularly a part of many art history and studio art courses and 
include additional costs. 

A gallery calendar of changing exhibitions is maintained 
throughout the academic year in the Wallace L. Anderson Gallery 
within the art building. One of these exhibitions is the student 
show, and art majors and minors are encouraged to set aside 
their best work to submit to this annual showing. In an adjacent 
gallery is a continuing exhibition of works from the permanent 
art collection. These gallery facilities offer a range of work that 
enhances classroom instruction. In addition, visiting artists and 
related art programs are made possible each year by a generous 
gift from the Class of 1936. 



FINE ARTS CONCENTRATION Credits 

ARTH 103 Survey of Ancient and Medieval Art 3 

or 

ARTH 104 Survey of Art 14 th Century to the Present 

ARTS 125 Drawing I 3 

ARTS 130 Two-Dimensional Design 3 

ARTS 140 Three-Dimensional Design 3 

ARTH 309 Early Modern Art and Architecture 3 

ARTH 310 Art and Architecture since 1940 3 

ARTS 225 Drawing II 3 

ARTS 230 Painting I 3 

ARTS 240 Sculpture 1 3 

ARTS 255 Printmaking 1 3 

One craft course from, but not limited to, 

the following courses 3 

ARTS 270 Ceramics I 

ARTS 273 Glass I 

ARTS 280 Metals I 

ARTS 290 Weaving I 



One, additional three-credit art elective (ARTH 101 and 

ARTH 102 do not fulfill this elective requirement) 3 

Total minimum credits: 36 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www. bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Art 



GRAPHIC DESIGN CONCENTRATION Credits 



ARTS 125 Drawing I 3 

ARTS 130 Two-Dimensional Design 3 

ARTS 140 Three-Dimensional Design 3 

ARTS 225 Drawing II 3 

ARTS 230 Painting I 3 

ARTS 240 Sculpture 1 3 

ARTS 260 Graphic Design 1 3 

ARTH 309 Early Modern Art and Architecture 3 

ARTH 310 Art and Architecture since 1940 3 

ARTS 361 Graphic Design II 3 

ARTS 362 Graphic Design III 3 

ARTS 460 Advanced Graphics 3 



Admission to the graphic design concentration is based on a 
portfolio review, but graphic design courses may be taken 
without this review. Normally the review should follow suc- 
cessful completion of ARTS 260. 

Total minimum credits: 36 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 



CRAFTS CONCENTRATION Credits 

ARTS 125 Drawing 1 3 

ARTS 130 Two-Dimensional Design 3 

ARTS 140 Three-Dimensional Design 3 

ARTS 230 Painting I 3 

or 

ARTS 235 Watercolor Painting I 

ARTS 240 Sculpture 1 3 

ARTH 309 Early Modern Art and Architecture 3 

ARTH 310 Art and Architecture since 1940 3 

ARTS 360 Business Issues for Visual Artists 3 

Choose two, level-l craft courses 6 

ARTS 270 Ceramics I 

ARTS 273 Glass I 

ARTS 280 Metals I 

ARTS 290 Weaving I 

One 300-level crafts course 3 

One 400-level crafts course 3 



Total minimum credits: 36 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 120 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 



ART HISTORY CONCENTRATION Credits 

ARTH 103 Survey of Ancient and Medieval Art 3 

ARTH 104 Survey of Art 14 th Century to the Present 3 

ARTS 125 Drawing I 3 

ARTS 130 Two-Dimensional Design 3 

ARTS 140 Three-Dimensional Design 3 

ARTH 309 Early Modern Art and Architecture 3 

Choose one 3 



ARTS 104 Introduction to Digital Imaging and 4-D Design 

ARTS 216 Photography I 

ARTS 230 Painting I 

ARTS 235 Watercolor Painting I 

ARTS 255 Printmaking I 

ARTS 260 Graphic Design I 
Choose one 3 

ARTS 240 Sculpture I 

ARTS 270 Ceramics I 

ARTS 273 Glass I 

ARTS 280 Metals I 

ARTS 290 Weaving I 
An art studio course chosen from the ARTS 200 or higher 

level of the courses listed above or any ARTH 200-level 



course or higher 3 

6 credits in 200 level or higher ARTH courses 6 

3 credits in non-Western art history from the following 

courses 3 



ARTH 205 Asian Art Survey: India, China and Japan 

ARTH 207 Introduction to African Art 

ARTH 208 Survey of Islamic Art and Architecture 

Total minimum credits: 36 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 



PHOTOGRAPHY CONCENTRATION Credits 



ARTH 218 History of Photography : 3 

ARTS 104 Introduction to Digital Imaging and 4-D Design 3 

ARTS 125 Drawing 1 3 

ARTS 130 Two-Dimensional Design 3 

ARTS 140 Three-Dimensional Design 3 

ARTS 216 Photography 1 3 

ARTS 217 Digital Photography 1 3 

ARTS 230 Painting I 3 

or 

ARTS 235 Watercolor Painting I 

ARTS 240 Sculpture I 3 

ARTS 316 Photography II 3 

ARTS 416 Advanced Photography 3 

Any ARTH course at the 200 or higher level 3 



Total minimum credits: 36 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



73 



Art 



BSC 



BRIPGfcWATfcK 
STATt OOUIOI 



Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 

ART EDUCATION CONCENTRATION 

Students majoring in education must refer to the Department of 
Elementary and Early Childhood Education and the Department 
of Secondary Education and Professional Programs for specific 
requirements and consult with the art education coordinator, 
Professor Dorothy Pulsifer, for additional information. 

Credits 



ARTH 103 Survey of Ancient and Medieval Art 

ARTH 104 Survey of Art 14 th Century to the Present 

ARTH 309 Early Modern Art and Architecture 

ARTS 125 Drawing I 

ARTS 130 Two-Dimensional Design 

ARTS 140 Three-Dimensional Design 

ARTS 216 Photography I 

ARTS 225 Drawing II 

ARTS 230 Painting I 

ARTS 240 Sculpture I 

ARTS 255 Printmaking I 

ARTS 260 Graphic Design I 

or 

ARTS 104 Introduction to Digital Imaging and 4-D Design 
ARTS 270 Ceramics I 



Total minimum credits: 39 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 

DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION OR SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major in art and elementary edu- 
cation, early childhood education or special education for licen- 
sure purposes. Appropriate advising materials with suggested 
course sequences are available. 



ART MINOR Credits 

ARTS 125 Drawing I -.3 

All students wishing to minor in art should meet with an art 

department adviser before selecting the remaining 15 

credits. 

Choose one 3 

ARTS 130 Two-Dimensional Design 

ARTS 140 Three-Dimensional Design 

12 credits in art and/or art history 12 

Total minimum credits: 18 

ART HISTORY MINOR Credits 

Not open to art majors 

ARTH 103 Survey of Ancient and Medieval Art 3 

ARTH 104 Survey of Art 14 th Century to the Present 3 

ARTH 309 Early Modern Art and Architecture 3 

Select four additional courses from art history offerings at 
the 200 level or above. ANTH 309 Anthropology of Art and 
PHIL 225 Philosophy of Art are other options within 

this requirement 12 

Total minimum credits: 21 

Honors Program 

The honors program in art provides highly motivated art majors 
with opportunities to enhance their academic program through 
intensive scholarly study and research designed to be of assis- 
tance in postgraduate employment or in the pursuit of an 
advanced degree in art. Contact the Department of Art for further 
information concerning eligibility and application. 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING CREATIVE 
ARTS 

The Master of Arts in Teaching degree was developed for high 
school and middle school subject area teachers who have an 
initial license and are seeking a professional license in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The MAT program is designed 
to meet the "appropriate master's degree" requirement, which 
is part of the criteria for professional stage licensure, as set forth 
in the most recent MA DESE licensure regulations. This degree 
program will also appeal to secondary school teachers who 
already hold 

a standard level or professional license and want to acquire addi- 
tional knowledge and a master's degree in the discipline. 

Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 
section of the catalog for information regarding graduate pro- 
gram procedures. 



74 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



b£c 

BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Ar 



Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 
years of work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon work 
completed during the junior and senior years 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• An initial teaching license 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

All accepted students must enroll under the direction of their 
adviser in GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning, which is 
described under "Graduate Advisers and Graduate Program 
Planning" in the "School of Graduate Studies" section of this 
catalog. 

Program Requirements Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

Education Core Courses 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

EDMC 531 The Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 3 

EDMC 532 The Teacher as Leader: From Issues to Advocacy.... 3 
EDMC 533 The Standards-Based Classroom: Instruction 

and Assessment for Diverse Learners 3 

EDMC 538 The Professional Teacher (final program course) .... 3 
MAT students are expected to have, or acquire in addition to 
degree requirements, an appropriate background of college level 
courses, to be determined by the department. 

A minimum of 18 approved graduate credits in the academic 
area of concentration, which meet the academic and 

professional objectives of the student, is required 18 

Successful completion of a comprehensive examination is 
also required. 

Total minimum credits: 34 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



75 



Biological Sciences 



BSC 



BRIDGE HAT E R 
STATfc COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Chairperson and Graduate Program Coordinator: 

Associate Professor Jeffrey Bowen 

Professors: Michael Carson, Kevin Curry, John Jahoda, 
Hardy Moore 

Associate Professors: Merideth Krevosky, Patricia Mancini, 
Donald Padgett 

Assistant Professors: Christopher Bloch, Joseph Burdo, 
Boriana Marmtcheva, Jonathan Roling 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1358 
Location: Conant Science Building, Room 226A 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/Biology 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BS in Biology 

Concentrations: Environmental Biology, 
Biomedical/Molecular Biology (Biomedical Area, Molecular 
Area), General Biology (Standard Program, Teacher 
Preparation Program) 

• BA in Biology 

• MAT - Biology 



UNDERGRADUATE MINOR 

• Biology 

• Biotechnology 

• Environmental Biology 

The mission of the biology program is to provide students with 
a broad background in the biological sciences allowing for 
flexibility in making career choices. The department offers an 
undergraduate program leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science or Bachelor of Arts and a graduate program leading to 
the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching. Students enrolled in the 
graduate program have the opportunity to develop their skills 
and knowledge in more specialized areas. 

The Bachelor of Science program is designed to provide the 
skills and knowledge necessary for employment in the biotech- 
nology, environmental, health-related and teaching areas, as 
well as providing a sound foundation for graduate or 
professional school. 

The overall goal of the program is to expose students to the 
scientific process and to promote a student's ability to think criti- 
cally. Ultimately, the aim is to transform the student into a more 
analytical thinker and to improve his/her confidence, both aca- 
demically and professionally. The department feels that the best 
way to achieve these goals for our biology students is through 
participation in an undergraduate research experience. 

The Bachelor of Arts permits the student to explore personal 
interests in biology while developing the background needed 
to use biological knowledge in association with a field such as 
sales, illustration or elementary education. With careful course 
selection, this degree can prepare the student for the opportuni- 
ties listed above for the Bachelor of Science. 



In addition to the broad array of biology courses, students 
have opportunities to join biology faculty in research projects, 
and to participate in internships, whether local, regional or out 
of state. 

The Department of Biological Sciences is located in the 
Conant Science Building. Located on the three acres next to the 
building are a 20 x 80 foot greenhouse and the biology garden, 
which includes a pond for aquatic plants. The greenhouse and 
gardens support laboratory and fieldwork and are planted with 
specimens of horticultural interest. The department has 1 teach- 
ing laboratories, two lecture rooms, a biology museum-seminar 
room, and four faculty-student research laboratories that include 
the bioassay laboratory, a tissue culture facility, an image analysis 
laboratory and the South Shore Herbarium. The laboratories are 
well equipped to help students apply the theoretical principles 
of their courses. Equipment includes not only light, fluorescent 
and electron microscopes but also a DNA sequencer, a micro- 
plate reader, electrophoretic equipment and a flow cytometer 
amongst other equipment. In addition, there is close cooperation 
between the biology and chemistry departments that allows for 
access to other equipment such as electrochemical equipment, a 
nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer, an atomic absorption 
spectrometer, several infrared (IR) spectrometers, a gas chro- 
matograph, a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer and a high 
pressure liquid chromatograph. 

The location of the campus is a major advantage for conduct- 
ing fieldwork and ecological studies. Within an hour's drive of 
the campus are such diverse habitats as bays, saltmarshes, sandy 
beaches, rocky shores, estuaries, bogs, freshwater ponds, streams 
and rivers (clean and polluted), white cedar swamps, marshes, 
pine groves and hemlock groves. 

The department maintains and operates the Watershed Access 
Laboratory and the Center for the Advancement of Science 
Exploration (CASE) which houses the BSC City Lab located in 
the John Joseph Moakley Center for Technological Applications. 
These laboratories are designed for use in teacher professional 
development in environmental education and biotechnology and 
for interdisciplinary studies by faculty and students 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 

The two versions of the biology major are the Bachelor of Science 
in Biology (BS) and the Bachelor of Arts in Biology (BA). Each 
student majoring in biology will be assigned a departmental 
academic adviser from among the faculty of the department, 
and should consult with the adviser in regard to both the BS 
versus BA decision, and selection of courses. It is also important 
to frequently meet with the adviser to verify progress toward 
completion of graduation requirements and meeting departmen- 
tal standards. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY (BS) 

The department offers a BS degree program with three concen- 
trations: environmental biology, biomedical/molecular biology 
and general biology. Within the biomedical/molecular concen- 
tration, a student focuses on either the biomedical area or the 
molecular area. Within the general concentration, a student 



76 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Biological Sciences 



focuses on the standard program or the high school/middle 
school teacher preparation program. All BS students are required 
to take a core of courses consisting of General Biology I and II, 
Cell Biology, Ecology, Genetics and Microbiology. In consultation 
with the departmental adviser, each student selects additional 
courses that satisfy the requirements of his or her particular con- 
centration. The Bachelor of Science is designed to prepare 
the student for employment as a biologist in a laboratory or 
field setting, or for advanced training at a graduate or 
professional institution. 

The Environmental Biology concentration presents course 
work in such areas as wetlands biology, biomonitoring, biom- 
etry, stream ecology and marine mammal biology. This program 
encourages students to use their biology electives to develop a 
diversified background of skills as well as recommended electives 
in other departments to complement their environmental inter- 
est and open future opportunities for internships and careers. 
Cooperative programs with community environmental monitor- 
ing organizations such as the Taunton River Watershed Alliance 
allow students to gain practical experience while investigating 
actual environmental problems. 

The Biomedical/Molecular Biology concentration offers 
course work in such fields as histology, immunology, virology, 
embryology, biochemistry, molecular biology and neurobiology. 
The two areas within this concentration are distinguished by 
their physiology courses: the biomedical area includes courses in 
Human Anatomy and Physiology, while the molecular area offers 
the option of Animal Physiology or Plant Physiology. The biomedi- 
cal area prepares students for health-related pursuits such as 
laboratory or clinical work, or health-professional schools. The 
molecular area is designed for students who plan on graduate 
study in cellular or molecular biology, and for those who seek 
a career in molecular biology or biotechnology laboratory work 
or research, biomedical/molecular internship opportunities are 
available in local hospitals and research laboratories as well as 
national agencies. 

The General Biology concentration is a broad program of 
biological study without defined specialization. The standard 
program provides a wide-ranging background together with 
courses that are tailored to the student's individual interests. 
The high school/middle school teacher preparation program is 
designed to provide the breadth of knowledge required for earn- 
ing Massachusetts teacher licensure and helping middle and high 
school pupils meet Massachusetts educational standards. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY 

(All BS students must take the biology core and cognate courses.) 

Grade Requirement 

Students must receive a grade of "C-" or higher for the biology 
core courses, (BIOL 121, BIOL 122, BIOL 225, BIOL 321 and BIOL 
428). A grade of "B-" or higher is required in BIOL 100 or BIOL 
1 02 in order for these courses to substitute as an equivalent to 
BIOL 121. Only one grade below "C-" earned in a course taught 
in the department and required outside of the biology core shall 
be accepted to fulfill the requirements for the bachelor's degree. 
Students receiving a grade below "C-" in additional courses may 



continue in the major but must repeat and successfully complete 
the course with the grade of "C-" or better or complete another 
course that fulfills the same required "area" for the major. To 
qualify for graduation with a degree in biology, the student must 
have a major grade point average (GPA) of 2.3 or higher. 

Biology Core Courses Credits 

BIOL 121-122 General Biology HI 8 

BIOL 200 Cell Biology 4 

BIOL 225 Ecology 4 

BIOL 321 Genetics 4 

BIOL 428 Microbiology (Writing Intensive in the Major Core 
Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) 4 

Cognate Courses 

CHEM 141-142 Chemical Principles HI 8 

CHEM 343-344 Organic Chemistry HI 8 

MATH 141 Elements of Calculus I 3 

or 

MATH 151 Calculus I* 

MATH 142 Elements of Calculus II* 3 

or 

MATH 152 Calculus II* 
or 

BIOL 297 Biometry 

PHYS 181 Elements of Physics 1 4 

or 

PHYS 243 General Physics I* 

PHYS 182 Elements of Physics II 4 

or 

PHYS 244 General Physics II* 
* Premedical, preveterinary and predental students: 

PHYS 243-244 is required. MATH 151 is preferred. A second 
semester of calculus should be taken. 

Total minimum credits in the 
biology core and cognate courses: 54 
Note: A student may not apply both BIOL 373 and BIOL 251-252 
toward the BS degree in biology. BIOL 280 may not be applied 
toward the BS degree in biology. 

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY 
CONCENTRATION Credits 

Biology core and cognate courses 54 

in addition to the following: 

BIOL 297 Biometry 4 

BIOL 341 Plant Physiology 4 

Select three environmental biology concentration elective 
courses (consult "A" below). BIOL 396 Research Problems 
in Biology; BIOL 497 Undergraduate Biological Research or 
BIOL 485 Honors Thesis; BIOL 498 Internship in Biology; 
BIOL 499 Directed Study in Biology; or BIOL 490 Special 
Topics in Biology (for a total of three credits only) can be 
used for only ONE biology elective or concentration 

elective 9-12 

One environmental concentration elective course in another dis- 
cipline is recommended (consult "B" that follows ) 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Biological Sciences 




BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Environmental Biology Concentration Internship/ 
Research 

Biology majors in the environmental biology concentration 
should strive to qualify for a three-credit internship or research 
experience (BIOL 396 Research Problems in Biology, BIOL 498 
Internship in Biology, or BIOL 497 Undergraduate Biological 
Research) as part of their concentration electives. Some examples 
are volunteer experience through the Student/Conservation 
Association, paid internships with regulatory agencies such as 
the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection or 
the National Park Services or research with professional investi- 
gators at Bridgewater State College. An expanded list of intern- 
ship opportunities may be accessed on the biology department 
Web site. Also, consult the biology internship section 
that follows. 

A) Environmental Biology Concentration Electives 

(three courses from the following list) 
BIOL 243 Systematic Botany 
BIOL 284 Invertebrate Zoology 
BIOL 325 Ichthyology 
BIOL 326 Marine Biology 
BIOL 327 Wetlands Biology 
BIOL 328 Stream Ecology 
BIOL 372 Animal Behavior 
BIOL 373 Animal Physiology 

BIOL 396 Research Problems in Biology (three credit limit) 

BIOL 408 The Biology of Marine Mammals 

BIOL 420 Limnology 

BIOL 422 Biological Evolution 

BIOL 423 Biological Invasions 

BIOL 425 Population Ecology 

BIOL 485 Honors Thesis 

BIOL 490 Special Topics in Biology (at least three credits) 
BIOL 497 Undergraduate Biological Research 
BIOL 498 Internship in Biology (three credit limit) 
BIOL 499 Directed Study in Biology (three credits) 

B) Environmental Biology Concentration Electives 

(one course recommended from the following list) 

CHEM 290 Environmental Chemistry 

COMP 105 Computer and Their Applications: An Introduction 

EASC 210 Oceanography 

EASC 240 Hydrology 

GEOG 213 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) I 

INTD 350 Soil Identification and Interpretation for Land Use 

Total minimum credits: 71 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 



BIOMEDICAL/ MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 
CONCENTRATION 

Biomedical/Molecular Biology Concentration: 
Biomedical Area Credits 

Biology core and cognate courses 54 

in addition to the following: 

BIOL 251-252 Human Anatomy and Physiology l-ll 8 

Select two biomedical/molecular concentration electives 

(consult "A" below) 6 

Select one additional biology elective of any type at or above 
the 300 level (three or four credits) (see the "Course 
Descriptions" section in this catalog for all additional 300- 

400 level courses) 3 

BIOL 396 Research Problems in Biology; BIOL 497 Under- 
graduate Biological Research or BIOL 485 Honors Thesis; 
BIOL 498 Internship in Biology; BIOL 499 Directed Study in 
Biology; or BIOL 490 Special Topics in Biology (for a total of 
three credits only) can be used for only ONE biology elective or 
concentration elective. 

Total minimum credits: 71 

Biomedical/Molecular Biology Concentration: 
Molecular Area Credits 

Biology core and cognate courses 54 

in addition to the following: 

BIOL 341 Plant Physiology 4 

or 

BIOL 373 Animal Physiology 

Select three biomedical/molecular concentration electives 
(consult "A" below) 9 

Select one additional biology elective of any type at or above 
the 300 level (three or four credits) (see the "Course 
Descriptions" section in this catalog for all additional 
300- and 400-level courses) 3 

BIOL 396 Research Problems in Biology; BIOL 497 

Undergraduate Biological Research or BIOL 485 Honors Thesis; 

BIOL 498 Internship in Biology; BIOL 499 Directed Study in 

Biology; or BIOL 490 Special Topics in 

Biology (for a total of three credits only) can be used for only 

ONE biology elective or concentration elective 

A. Biomedical/Molecular Biology Concentration 

Electives: 

BIOL 284 Invertebrate Zoology 

BIOL 320 Biochemistry 

BIOL 350 Molecular Biology 

BIOL 371 Histology 

BIOL 375 Immunology 

BIOL 376 General Endocrinology 

BIOL 396 Research Problems in Biology (3 credit limit) 

BIOL 382 Comparative Chordate Anatomy 

BIOL 430 Embryology 

BIOL 434 Biological Electron Microscopy 

BIOL 436 Mammalian Reproductive Physiology 

BIOL 450 Virology 



78 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Biological Sciences 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



BIOL 472 Human Genetics 
BIOL 475 Parisitology 
BIOL 482 Neurobiology 
BIOL 485 Honors Thesis 

BIOL 490 Special Topics in Biology (at least three credits) 
BIOL 497 Undergraduate Biological Research 
BIOL 498 Internship in Biology (three credit limit) 
BIOL 499 Directed Study in Biology (three credit limit) 

Total minimum credits: 70 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 



BIOMEDICAL/ MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 
CONCENTRATION INTERNSHIP/RESEARCH 

Biology majors in the biomedical/molecular concentration should 
strive to qualify for three credits of internship or research experi- 
ence (BIOL 498 Internship in Biology or BIOL 396 Research 
Problems in Biology; BIOL 497 Undergraduate Biological 
Research) as part of their concentration electives. Some examples 
are volunteer or paid experiences in a nearby laboratory or 
clinic; internships with agencies such as The National Institutes 
of Health, Jackson Laboratory or The Washington Center; or 
research with professional investigators at Bridgewater State 
College. An expanded list of internship opportunities may be 
accessed on the biology department Web site. Also consult the 
biology internship section that follows. 



GENERAL BIOLOGY CONCENTRATION 

General Biology Concentration: 



Standard Program Credits 

Biology core and cognate courses 54 

in addition to the following: 

BIOL 341 Plant Physiology 4 

BIOL 373 Animal Physiology 4 



Three courses at or above the 200 level for a total of at least 
nine credits. (See the "Course Description" section in this 
catalog for all 200-400 level courses.) BIOL 396 Research 
Problems in Biology; BIOL 497 Undergraduate Biological 
Research or BIOL 485 Honors Thesis; BIOL 498 Internship 
in Biology; BIOL 499 Directed Study in Biology; or 
BIOL 490 Special Topics in Biology (for a total of three credits 
only) can be used for only ONE biology elective or 

concentration elective 9-12 

Total minimum credits: 71 



Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 

General Biology Concentration: 
High School/Middle School Teacher 
Preparation Program 

Students preparing to teach in high school or middle school must 
complete this BS degree in biology and minor either in second- 
ary education-high school (grades 8-12) or secondary educa- 
tion-middle school (grades 5-8). Successful completion of either 
of these programs will lead to Massachusetts Initial Teacher 
Licensure. Please refer to the catalog entry for the "Department 
of Secondary Education and Professional Programs" for specific 
teacher licensure and program requirements. 

Credits 



Biology core and cognate courses 54 

in addition to the following: 

BIOL 251-252 Human Anatomy and Physiology l-ll 8 

BIOL 341 Plant Physiology 4 

BIOL 422 Biological Evolution 3 

BIOL 382 Comparative Chordate Anatomy 3 

or 

BIOL 284 Invertebrate Zoology 
EASC 100 Physical Geology 4 



The following course is recommended: 
BIOL 490 Special Topics in Biology: Bioethics 
or 

PHIL 2 1 5 Environmental Ethics 
or 

PHIL 2 1 6 Values and Technology 
Biology departmental approval to participate in the teaching 
practicum as signified by the signature of the biology department 
chairperson on the application to engage in the practicum is 
provided, if the following criteria are met: 

• Minimum biology GPA of 2.8 

• Any grade of "D+" or lower in a biology core course has 
been repeated for a grade of at least "C-" 

• Any grade of "D+" or lower in a biology elective has been 
repeated for a grade of at least "C-", or substituted with an 
approved biology elective with a grade of at least "C-" 

Total minimum credits: 76 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bhdgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Biological Sciences 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BIOLOGY (BA) 

The BA degree is designed for the biology major who wishes 
to use biological knowledge in pursuit of a career outside of 
biology. Examples of such careers are teaching elementary 
education, science writing, scientific illustration, technical sales 
or publishing. By carefully selecting biology courses and adding 
particular courses in chemistry, physics and mathematics beyond 
the BA requirements, a BA degree holder may qualify for many of 
the career opportunities listed under the BS. 

The BA degree requires a minimum of 1 2 courses with the 
following specifications: 

Grade Requirement 

Students must receive a grade of "C-" or higher for the biology 
core courses BIOL 121 and BIOL 122. A grade of "B-" or higher 
is required in BIOL 1 00 or BIOL 1 02 in order for these courses to 
substitute as an equivalent to BIOL 121. Only one grade below 
"C-" earned in a course taught in the department and outside 
of the biology core shall be accepted to fulfill the requirements 
for the bachelor's degree. Students receiving a grade below "C-" 
in additional courses may continue in the major but must repeat 
and successfully complete the course with the grade of "C-" or 
better or complete another course that fulfills the same required 
"area" for the major. To qualify for graduation with a degree 
in biology, the student must have a major grade point average 
(GPA) of 2.3 or higher. 

Credits 

BIOL 121-122 General Biology I II 8 

Two biology courses at the 200 level 6 

Two biology courses at the 300 level* 6 

Two biology courses at the 400 level* 6 

Two additional biology courses at or above the 200 level 6 

*Note: As part of the 300- and 400-level required courses, stu- 
dents must complete either BIOL 328 Stream Ecology or BIOL 
428 Microbiology as their Writing Intensive in the Major Core 
Curriculum Requirement (CWRM). 



Cognate Courses 

CHEM 131-132 Survey of Chemistry I II 7 

Note: A student may not apply both BIOL 280 and BIOL 251-252 
toward the BA degree in biology. 

Total minimum credits: 39 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 



DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
AND EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION OR 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major in biology and elementary 
and early childhood education or special education. Appropriate 
advising materials are available in the Department of Biological 
Sciences and Department of the Elementary and Early 
Childhood Education. 

BIOLOGY MINOR Credits 

A minimum of 18 credits in biology, including: 

BIOL 121 General Biology 1 4 

At least 14 additional credits in biology at or above the 
200 level planned in consultation with the chairperson of 
the Department of Biological Sciences 14 

Note: BIOL 122 General Biology II may be substituted for one 
of the courses at or above the 200 level. 

Total minimum credits: 18 

BIOTECHNOLOGY MINOR Credits 

A minimum of 20 credits in biology, including: 

BIOL 121 General Biology 1 4 

BIOL 200 Cell Biology 4 

BIOL 321 Genetics 4 

BIOL 428 Microbiology 4 

At least four additional credits in biology from the biomedical/ 
molecular biology concentration electives planned in 
consultation with the chairperson of the Department of 

Biological Sciences 4 

Total minimum credits: 20 

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOLOGY MINOR Credits 

A minimum of 19 credits in biology, including: 

BIOL 121 General Biology 1 4 

BIOL 122 General Biology II 4 

BIOL 225 Ecology 4 

At least seven additional credits in biology from the environ- 
mental concentration electives planned with the chairperson 

of the Department of Biological Sciences 7 

Total minimum credits: 19 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The departmental honors program in biology provides an oppor- 
tunity for highly qualified biology majors to study biology and 
to conduct independent research in biology for honors credit. 
Interested students should contact the Department of Biological 
Sciences by their sophomore year for further information con- 
cerning eligibility and application. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Biological Sciences 



UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH 

The Department of Biological Sciences provides the opportunity 
for students to participate in a true research experience, 
which is increasingly an advantageous component of under- 
graduate training. 

Each semester, BIOL 396 Research Problems in Biology and 
BIOL 497 Undergraduate Biological Research are offered by 
faculty members who direct and supervise either individuals or a 
small team of undergraduates in a research project. Students are 
intimately involved with experimental design as well as data col- 
lection, analysis and interpretation. The course culminates with 
a student presentation of the semester's work in a departmental 
seminar. These courses are often followed by a presentation 
at a professional scientific meeting. Research topics vary from 
semester to semester as different faculty members direct the 
research course; equally valuable training and experience in sci- 
entific methodology is obtained with all topics. The Department 
of Biological Sciences highly recommends this experience which 
adds a profitable dimension that is not provided by ordinary 
course work. 

BIOLOGY INTERNSHIP 

Biology students interested in developing a field or laboratory 
experience through BIOL 498 Internship in Biology must meet 
the following criteria to be considered: 

• Prior completion of at least 54 credits and at least two 
semesters of biology at Bridgewater State College. 

• Minimum 2.5 cumulative GPA overall, and 2.7 GPA 
in biology. 

• Prior agreement of a faculty member to act as faculty super- 
visor and oversee the specific internship. 

• Submission of a completed internship application form to 
the department chairperson by the middle of the semester 
preceding the internship. 

A list of internship opportunities may be accessed at the 
Department of Biological Sciences Web site. 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING BIOLOGY 

The Master of Arts in Teaching degree was developed for high 
school and middle school subject area teachers who have an 
initial license and are seeking a professional license in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The MAT program is designed 
to meet the "appropriate master's degree" requirement, which is 
part of the criteria for professional stage licensure, as set forth in 
the most recent MA DESE licensure regulations. This degree pro- 
gram will also appeal to secondary school teachers who already 
hold a standard level of professional license and want to acquire 
additional knowledge and a master's degree in the discipline. 

Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 
section of the catalog for information regarding graduate pro- 
gram procedures. 



Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 
years of work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon work 
completed during the junior and senior years 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• An initial teaching license 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

All accepted students must enroll under the direction of 
their adviser in GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning, which 
is described under "Graduate Advisers and Graduate Program 
Planning" in the "School of Graduate Studies" section of 
this catalog. 

Program Requirements Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

Education Core Courses 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

EDMC 531 The Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 3 

EDMC 532 The Teacher as Leader: From Issues to Advocacy.... 3 
EDMC 533 The Standards-Based Classroom: 

Instruction and Assessment for Diverse Learners 3 

EDMC 538 The Professional Teacher (final program course) .... 3 
MAT students are expected to have, or acquire in addition to 
degree requirements, an appropriate background of college- 
level courses, to be determined by the department. 
1 8 credit hours of biology - graduate-level course work from 

among the following is required: 
(The student may take the same numbered course more 

than once if the subject matter is different.) 18 

BIOE 51 1 Advanced Biological Topics and Techniques 
BIOE 512 Advances in Biological Science 
BIOE 5 1 3 Advances in Cell/Molecular Biology 
BIOE 514 Advances in Biomedical/Physiological Biology 
BIOE 515 Advances in Ecological/Environmental Biology 
BIOL 503 Directed Study (or other approved course) 
BIOE 51 1 - BIOE 515 will focus on outcomes. 
Teachers will be expected to develop a knowledge base appro- 
priate to the subject matter and to develop the skills and tech- 
niques needed for laboratory or fieldwork in the field study. 
Students may not take BIOE 500-level graduate courses that 
cover subject matter that the student has previously taken either 
at the graduate or undergraduate level. 
Successful completion of a biology department comprehensive 
examination is also required. 

Total minimum credits: 34 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 
GENERAL SCIENCE 

This program is inactive. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Chemical Sciences 



bSc 

HMIIX.I 1MIU 



STA 1 1. < <>U-fc<»h 



FACULTY 

Chairperson and Graduate Program Coordinator: 

Associate Professor Edward Brush 

Professor: Frank Gorga 

Associate Professors: Steven Haefner, Cielito King 

Assistant Professors: Samer Lone. Chifuru Noda, 
Stephen Waratuke 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1233 
Location: Conant Science Building, Room 318 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/chem 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BA in Chemistry 

• BS in Chemistry 

Concentrations: Biochemistry, Environmental Chemistry, 
Professional Chemistry 

• BS in Chemistry-Geology (offered jointly with the 
Department of Earth Sciences) 

• MAT - Physical Science 

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• Biochemistry 

• Chemistry 

The Department of Chemical Sciences offers programs lead- 
ing to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in 
Chemistry. These programs are designed to provide the skills and 
knowledge necessary to prepare students for successful careers 
in the chemical, pharmaceutical or biotech industries for chemi- 
cal research, teaching, oceanography and environmental science 
or for further study in graduate degree programs and 
professional schools. 

The department is housed in the Conant Science Building 
and maintains a suite of modern scientific instrumentation that 
is used for both teaching and research purposes. This includes 
electrochemical equipment, a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) 
spectrometer, an atomic absorption spectrometer (AA), several 
infrared (IR) spectrometers, an ultraviolet-visible spectrophotom- 
eter (UVA/is), and a luminescence spectrometer. Other equipment 
includes a gas chromatograph (GC), a gas chromatograph/mass 
spectrometer and a high pressure liquid chromatograph. 

Students, staff and faculty maintain an atmosphere of infor- 
mal interaction, both inside and outside the classroom and 
laboratory. Many students participate in Chemistry Club activi- 
ties, which include seminars by area scientists, visits to academic 
and industrial laboratories and special social events. Students are 
encouraged to participate in research and together with faculty 
often attend American Chemical Society (ACS) and other profes- 
sional meetings throughout the country to present their 
research results. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF ARTS/BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE 

The chemistry major, with a concentration in biochemistry, envi- 
ronmental chemistry or professional chemistry, leads to the BS 
degree. These programs are designed for students who plan a 
career as a professional chemist or biochemist either immediately 
after graduation or after graduate work in a chemically related 
discipline. Satisfactory performance (a 3.0 average or better) in 
any of these programs gives students the preparation required 
to obtain an assistantship or fellowship in graduate school. The 
biochemistry and the professional chemistry programs are both 
certified by the American Chemical Society. 

The chemistry major (without a concentration) leads to the 
BA degree. This program is designed for students who wish to 
prepare for fields such as medicine, dentistry, secondary school 
teaching, chemical or pharmaceutical sales, pharmacy, envi- 
ronmental sciences or veterinary medicine. A minimum number 
of chemistry courses are required so that a program of other 
courses suited to the individual's interests may be developed in 
consultation with the student's adviser. 

Additionally, the department offers a chemistry-geology major 
jointly with the Department of Earth Sciences. It also participates 
in preprofessional advising for students interested in medicine 
and dentistry or oceanography. Additional information may be 
found in the "Interdisciplinary and Preprofessional Programs" 
section of this catalog. 

Students interested in any of the programs offered by the 
department should enroll in CHEM 141 Chemical Principles I and 
calculus (MATH 1 5 1 or MATH 1 4 1 ) in the fall semester of their 
first year. Additionally, students interested in biochemistry should 
also enroll in BIOL 121. In the spring semester of the first year, 
students will normally take CHEM 100 Computers in Chemistry 
in addition to continuing with CHEM 142 Chemical Principles II 
and the second semester of calculus. Students need not decide 
among the various programs within the department until the 
spring of their second year. Because of the sequential nature of 
many courses required in our programs, we urge new students to 
consult with a chemistry faculty member in addition to the regu- 
lar freshman advisers during the first year registration process. 



CHEMISTRY MAJOR 

(Leading to a BA degree) Credits 

CHEM 100 Computers in Chemistry (COMP 100 is 

an acceptable substitute) 2 

CHEM 141-142 Chemical Principles l-ll 8 

CHEM 242 Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry 3 

CHEM 343-344 Organic Chemistry l-ll 8 

CHEM 381-382 Physical Chemistry l-ll 8 

CHEM 461 General Biochemistry I _ 4 

MATH 151-152 Calculus l-ll (MATH 141-142 are acceptable 

substitutes with the permission of the adviser*) 6 

PHYS 243-244 General Physics l-ll (PHYS 181-182 are 

acceptable substitutes with permission of adviser*) 8 



82 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



bSc 



BRIPGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Chemical Sciences 



* Note: MATH 141-142 and PHYS 181-182 are not acceptable 
as substitutes in the professional chemistry program. 

Total minimum credits: 47 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 

CHEMISTRY MAJOR WITH A 
CONCENTRATION IN BIOCHEMISTRY 

(Leading to a BS degree; approved by 

the American Chemical Society) Credits 

All of the courses required for the chemistry major, 

except CH EM 242 44 

plus the following additional courses: 

CHEM 444 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3 

CHEM 462 General Biochemistry II 3 

CHEM 466 Advanced Biochemistry Laboratory 2 

BIOL 121 General Biology 1 4 

BIOL 200 Cell Biology 4 

BIOL 321 Genetics 4 

BIOL 428 Microbiology 4 

One of the following 3 

CHEM 241 Quantitative Chemical Analysis 

CHEM 250 Instrumentation 

CHEM 450 Instrumental Analysis 

Total minimum credits: 71 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 

CHEMISTRY MAJOR WITH A 
CONCENTRATION IN 
ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY 

(Leading to a BS degree) Credits 

All of the courses listed for the chemistry major 47 

plus the following additional courses: 

CHEM 290 Environmental Chemistry 3 

CHEM 450 Instrumental Analysis 3 

CHEM 490 Special Topics in Chemistry 3 

BIOL 121 General Biology 1 4 

EASC 100 Physical Geology 4 

BIOL 122 General Biology II 4 

or 

EASC 101 Historical Geology 



Select one course from the following 4 

BIOL 225 Ecology 
BIOL 420 Limnology 
EASC 240 Hydrology 
EASC 250 Geomorphology 
EASC 350 Structural Geology 
EASC 450 Geochemistry 

Total minimum credits: 72 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as 
specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew. 
edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see 
the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 

CHEMISTRY MAJOR WITH A 
CONCENTRATION IN 
PROFESSIONAL CHEMISTRY 

(Leading to a BS degree; approved 

by the American Chemical Society) Credits 

All of the courses required for the chemistry major* 47 

plus the following additional courses: 

CHEM 241 Quantitative Chemical Analysis 3 

CHEM 444 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3 

CHEM 450 Instrumental Analysis 3 

CHEM 492 Laboratory Techniques 3 

MATH 251 Calculus III 3 

One additional mathematics course selected from 

the following 3 

MATH 110 Elementary Statistics I 

MATH 120 Introduction to Linear Algebra 

MATH 200 Probability and Statistics 

MATH 202 Linear Algebra 

MATH 316 Differential Equations 
* Note: MATH 141-142 and PHYS 181-182 are not acceptable as 

substitutes in the professional chemistry program. 

Total minimum credits: 65 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. These 
earned hours include the core curriculum requirements as speci- 
fied in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of this 
catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, www.bridgew.edu/ 
corecurriculum. For additional graduation requirements, see the 
"Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog.. 

CHEMISTRY-GEOLOGY MAJOR 

(Leading to a BS in Chemistry-Geology) 
A major in chemistry-geology is offered jointly with the 
Department of Earth Sciences. See the catalog section 
titled "Interdisciplinary and Preprofessional Programs" for 
detailed information. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bhdgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



BSC 



STATt COCLfcGfc 



Chemical Sciences 



DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION OR SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major in chemistry or chemistry- 
geology and elementary education, early childhood education 
or special education for licensure purposes. Please contact the 
Department of Chemical Sciences and the appropriate education 
department for further information. 

MINOR IN SECONDARY (HIGH SCHOOL, 
MIDDLE SCHOOL OR PreK-12 SPECIALIST) 
EDUCATION 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 

This program is inactive. 



CHEMISTRY 

This program is inactive. 



GENERAL SCIENCE 

This program is inactive. 



PHYSICAL SCIENCE 



Students may major in chemistry and minor in secondary (high 
school, grades 8- 1 2); middle school (grades 5-8 or PreK- 1 2 

specialist) education. Successful completion of these programs The MAT in Physical Science degree was developed for high 

will lead to Massachusetts Initial Teacher Licensure. Please school and middle school subject area teachers who have an 

refer to the "Department of Secondary Education and initial license in chemistry, earth science or physics and are 

Professional Programs" for specific teacher licensure and seeking a professional license in the Commonwealth of 

program requirements. Massachusetts. This MAT program is defined to meet the 

"appropriate master's degree" requirement, which is part of the 

rucMKTDV MINOR r ^tT criteria for professional stage licensure, as set forth in the most 

KY IYIINUK Lrecms recem Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary 

CHEM 100 Computers in Chemistry 2 Education licensure regulations. 

Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 

one other chemistry course at the 200-level or higher sect|0n f thj t , for mformatlon regarding program policy 

CHEM 141-142 Chemical Principles I and II 8 an d procedures 

CHEM 343-344 Organic Chemistry I and II 8 /" k .. 

3 ' . .. _ For current information concerning proqram requirements, 

Total minimum credits: 18 , . „ n , . * , . . y ; , y M 

consult the Physics section of this catalog. 

BIOCHEMISTRY MINOR Credits 

CHEM 141-142 Chemical Principles I and II 8 

CHEM 343-344 Organic Chemistry I and II 8 

CHEM 461-462 General Biochemistry I and II 7 

Total minimum credits: 23 



HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in chemistry provides highly motivated 
chemistry majors with opportunities to enhance their academic 
program through intensive scholarly study and research designed 
to be of assistance in postgraduate employment or in the pursuit 
of an advanced degree in chemistry. Contact the Department of 
Chemical Sciences for further information concerning eligibility 
and application. 



Communication Studies 




FACULTY 

Chairperson and Graduate Program Coordinator 

Associate Professor Jabbar Al-Obaidi 

Professors: Joel Litvin, Thomas Mickey, Nancy Street 

Associate Professors: Arthur Lizie Jr., Susan Miskelly, 
Melanie McNaughton, Nancy Owens 

Assistant Professors: Jason Edwards, Bjom Ingvoldstad, 
Nancy Van Leuven 

Instructors: Amanda Brozana, Maria Hegbloom 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1348 
Location: Maxwell Library, Room 215 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/depts/comm/ 



DEGREE PROGRAM 

• BA in Communication Studies 
Concentrations: Corporate Communication, Individualized, 
Media Studies and Communication Technologies, Speech 
Communication 



UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• Communication Studies 

• Public Relations* 

• Interdisciplinary minor 



The Department of Communication Studies is committed to 
providing excellent undergraduate programs for students at 
Bridgewater State College. The department offers a Bachelor of 
Arts (BA) in communication studies. It provides students with a 
broadly based liberal arts grounding in history, structure, process, 
culture, social application and functions of human communica- 
tion, and with the competencies required for effective commu- 
nication in the 2 1 st century. It also supports an integrated model 
of learning and relaxing the rigid boundaries between academic 
requirements, professional training and the liberal arts. 

In addition, the Department of Communication Studies 
endeavors to: 

• foster the student's ability to integrate critical, theoretical 
and ethical perspectives in the field of communication and 
apply them to their professional, personal and civic lives. 

• train students in analytical and critical thought, in oral expo- 
sition and argument in the literature of communication and 
in the research that supports it. 

• provide through theoretical perspectives and practical 
experience, rich opportunities and preparation for careers in 
communication and media, for work in other fields for which 
communication is pivotal for success and for advanced study 
in communication. 

In addition to study abroad and internship, students major- 
ing in communication studies are involved in a number of 
activities beyond the classroom pertaining to their academic 
program. These activities include membership in the National 
Communication Association BSC Chapter (NCA), the Public 



Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA), the Bridgewater 
Video and Film Association (BVFA), Lambda Pi Eta and the 
Forensics Society. Majors also participate in fundraising for good 
causes; service learning; community outreach projects; creative 
and expressive projects; and in speaking, acting and debate tour- 
naments at both the regional and national level. The operation 
of the radio station WBIM (91.5 FM) and the publication of the 
BSC newspaper "The Comment" is under the direct management 
of students. These activities provide students with opportunities 
for professional development as well as public relations engage- 
ments to meet and exchange views and opinions on issues 
related to cultural dialogues, and local and global issues. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The Department of Communication Studies strives to educate the 
residents of the region in the matter and practices of the field of 
communication and media with the following concentrations: 



MEDIA STUDIES AND COMMUNICATION 
TECHNOLOGIES CONCENTRATION 

The Media Studies and Communication Technologies concentra- 
tion introduces students to the theory and practice of the study 
of media as part of their communication studies major. Through 
advising, students have the ability to more deeply explore their 
particular area of interest. Students may select elective courses 
that focus on film and media studies, including courses on media 
history, theory and criticism; journalism, including news gather- 
ing and production across a range of media; or multimedia pro- 
duction, which offers a wide breadth of production opportunities, 
focusing on video but spanning from radio to new media. 

Grade Requirement 

A grade of "C" or higher in all communication studies (COMM) 
course work is required for all students. 



Required Courses Credits 

COMM 221 Foundations of Communication 3 

COMM 222 Communication Studies Theory....: 3 

COMM 224 Communication Studies Research 3 

COMM 229 Foundations of Media Studies 3 

COMM 311 Media Literacy 3 

COMM 496 Seminar in Media Studies and Communication 
Technologies (Writing Intensive in the Major Core 

Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) 3 

Choose one course (three credits) from the following 3 



COMM 215 Television Studio Production (Television 

Production 1) 
COMM 225 Film as Communication 
COMM 240 Introduction to Journalism 

Choose three courses (nine credits) from the following 9 

COMM 150 Practicum in Communication Media 
COMM 214 Radio Production 
COMM 240 Introduction to Journalism 
COMM 288 Communication Colloquium 
COMM 290 Beginning Videography 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



85 



Communication Studies 



COMM291 Video Editing 

COMM 310 Film History: Western Cinema 

COMM 313 Media Law and Ethics 

COMM 325 Broadcast News Writing 

COMM 335 News and Politics 

COMM 345 Writing for Radio and Television 

COMM 350 Documentary Film 

COMM 355 Images of Gender in Media 

COMM 366 Advanced Audio Production 

COMM 370 Screenwritmg 

COMM 371 Global Cinema 

COMM 390 Television Direction (Documentary) 

COMM 397 Cyber Culture and Digital Media 

COMM 401 Film Theory and Criticism 

COMM 415 Advanced Television Production (Features) 

COMM 430 Topics in Film 

COMM 462 Patterns of International Communication 
COMM 498 Internship in Communication (three credits only) 
COMM 499 Directed Study in Communication 
(one to three credits only) 
Choose two courses (six credits) from any 300- or 400-level 

communications studies (COMM) courses 6 

Total minimum credits: 36 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION 
CONCENTRATION 

The speech communication concentration within the communi- 
cation studies major provides a broad perspective of communica- 
tion knowledge and skills within interpersonal, group, social, 
national and international situations. Students who choose this 
concentration will become acutely aware of speech communica- 
tion subjects such as interpersonal, group, gender, rhetoric, politi- 
cal and intercultural communication. 

Grade Requirement 

A grade of "C" or higher in all communication studies (COMM) 
course work contributing to the major is required for all students. 

Required Courses Credits 

COMM 221 Foundations of Communication 3 

COMM 222 Communication Studies Theory 3 

COMM 224 Communication Studies Research 3 

COMM 250 Public Speaking 3 

COMM 495 Communication Studies Seminar 

(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 

Requirement -CWRM) 3 

Choose one course (three credits) from the following 3 

COMM 210 Voice and Diction 

COMM 260 Group Communication and Decision Making 

COMM 270 Interpersonal Communication 



Choose 12 credits from the following 12 

COMM 110 Forensics Practicum 

COMM 135 Freshman Honors Colloquium 

COMM 136 Freshman Honors Colloquium 

COMM 286 Sophomore Honors Colloquium 

COMM 287 Sophomore Honors Colloquium 

COMM 305 Advanced Forensics Laboratory 

COMM 330 Business and Professional Communication 

COMM/INTD/PSYC 349 Perspectives on the Holocaust 

COMM 360 Argumentation and Advocacy 

COMM 361 Gender Communication 

COMM 362 American Public Address 

COMM/POLI 364 Political Communication 

COMM 365 Introduction to Intercultural Communication 

COMM 399 Topical Studies 

COMM 402 Interpersonal Conflict Resolution 

COMM 450 Persuasion 

COMM 498 Internship (three credits only) 

COMM 499 Directed Study (one to three credits only) 
Choose two courses (six credits) from any 300- or 400-level 

communications studies (COMM) courses 6 

Total minimum credits: 36 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

CORPORATE COMMUNICATION 
CONCENTRATION 

The corporate communication concentration within the com- 
munication studies major allows students to focus on either 
public relations or organizational communication. Both areas 
within the concentration serve to foster a deeper understand- 
ing and practical application of communication knowledge and 
skills within for-profit, government and nonprofit organizations. 
Students will also focus attention on communication issues relat- 
ed to the impact of globalization, the implications of communica- 
tion issues related to the impact of globalization, the implications 
of communication technology and demonstrate proficiency in 
communication management. 

Grade Requirement 

A grade of "C" or higher in all communications studies (COMM) 
course work contributing to the major is required for all students. 

Required Courses Credits 

COMM 221 Foundations of Communication 3 

COMM 222 Communication Studies Theory 3 

COMM 224 Communication Studies Research _ 3 

COMM 492 Seminar in Corporate Communication 3 



86 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



bSc 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Communication Studies 



Choose one course (three credits) from the following 3 

COMM 226 Introduction to Public Relations 

COMM 303 Introduction to Organizational Communication 

Choose five courses (15 credits) from the following 15 

COMM 227 Multimedia Design for Public Relations 

COMM 312 Writing for Public Relations 

COMM 330 Business and Professional Communication 

COMM 337 Public Relations Theory 

COMM 341 Public Relations Case Studies 

COMM 353 Corporate Communication and Social 

Responsibility 
COMM 391 Public Relations Practicum 
COMM 470 Organizational Communication: Events Planning 
COMM 472 Communication Training and Development 
COMM 498 Internship in Communication (three credits only) 
COMM 499 Directed Study in Communication 
(one to three credits only) 

Choose two courses (six credits) from any 300- to 400-level 

communications studies (COMM) courses 6 

Total minimum credits: 36 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

INDIVIDUALIZED CONCENTRATION 

Students may work with their advisers to design, with the 
approval of the chairperson, an individualized concentration. 
The individualized concentration must include 36 credits from 
departmental course offerings. 

Grade Requirement 

A grade of "C"or higher in all communication studies course 
work contributing to the major is required for all students. 

Required Courses Credits 

COMM 221 Foundations of Communication 3 

COMM 222 Communication Studies Theory 3 

COMM 224 Communication Studies Research 3 

Choose one course (three credits) from the following 3 

COMM 492 Seminar in Corporate Communication 
COMM 495 Communication Studies Seminar 
(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 
Requirement-CWRM) 
COMM 496 Seminar in Media Studies and 
Communication Technologies (Writing Intensive 
in the Major Core Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) 
Choose eight courses (24 credits) from any communications 
studies (COMM) courses including at least two courses 
(six credits) from any 300- or 400-level communication 
studies (COMM) courses 24 



Note: If COMM 498 Internship on Communication Studies 
(limited to three credits only) or COMM 499 Directed Study in 
Communication (limited to one to three credits only) is selected, 
a combined maximum of six credits only may be applied to the 
concentration requirement. 

Total minimum credits: 36 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

COMMUNICATION STUDIES MINOR Credits 

COMM 221 Foundations of Mass Communication 3 

COMM 222 Communication Studies Theory 3 

Plus 12 additional credits selected from communication 
(COMM) courses, of which six must be at the 300 level 

or higher 12 

Total minimum credits: 18 

INTERDISCIPLINARY MINOR IN PUBLIC 
RELATIONS 

This public relations minor is offered as a cooperative effort by 
the Departments of Communication Studies, Management and 
English. It provides an opportunity for students to acquire knowl- 
edge and skills germane to public relations practice. Students 
take courses in management, advertising, public relations, mar- 
keting and business writing or elect presentational skills courses, 
for a total of 2 1 credit hours. 

Required Courses Credits 

COMM 226 Introduction to Public Relations 3 

COMM 391 Public Relations Practicum 3 

MGMT 130 Principles of Management 3 

MGMT 200 Marketing Principles 3 

MGMT 424 Advertising 3 

Choose one \ 3 

COMM 212 Announcing 

COMM 250 Public Speaking 

COMM 330 Business and Professional Communication 
Choose one 3 

ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics 

ENGL 202 Business Communication 
Interested students should contact the department chairperson 
of the Department of Communication Studies, the Department of 
Management or the Department of English. 

Total minimum credits: 21 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Communication Studies 



DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION OR SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major, one in communication 
studies and another in elementary education, early childhood 
education or special education for licensure purposes. 



HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in communication studies provides highly 
motivated communication studies majors with opportunities to 
enhance their academic program through intensive scholarly 
study and research designed to be of assistance in postgraduate 
employment or in the pursuit of an advanced degree in com- 
munication studies. Contact the Department of Communication 
Studies for further information concerning eligibility 
and application. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THEATER 

This program is inactive. 




88 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Criminal Justice 




FACULTY 

Chairperson: Associate Professor Carolyn Petrosino 

Graduate Program Coordinator: Assistant Professor 
Jo-Ann Della-Giustina 

Associate Professor: Dion Dennis 

Assistant Professors: Kyung-shick Choi, Aviva Twersky 
Glasner, Mitchell Librett, Dina Perrone, Richard Wright 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.2107 

Location: Hart Hall, Room 337 

Web site: www.bridgew.edu/CriminalJustice 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BS in Criminal Justice 

• MS in Criminal Justice 

Concentrations: Administration of Justice, Crime and 
Corrections 



UNDERGRADUATE MINOR 

• Criminal Justice 



The Department of Criminal Justice offers a major program in 
criminal justice and a minor in criminal justice. 

The department provides a rigorous discipline-specific cur- 
riculum aimed at developing well-rounded graduates with strong 
critical thinking abilities. Department programs also impart skills 
to students, preparing them for a wide range of career options 
in the field of criminal justice or closely related fields. Career 
options include positions in the criminal justice system, educa- 
tion, research, private treatment agencies and various state and 
federal justice agencies. The department encourages students to 
continue on to graduate study. 

Many department faculty members engage in research 
and the department encourages student-faculty collaborative 
research. Students may also carry out internships. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice provides students with 
a solid background in criminal justice and criminology, enabling 
them to develop a broad understanding of crime and the criminal 
justice system. The department developed the criminal justice 
program to meet the standards for criminal justice programs 
designed by the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education (BHE). 
The same standards are also affirmed by the Academy of Criminal 
Justice (ACJS). Program standards emphasize the development of 
skills in critical thinking, communications, conceptualizing ideas 
and understanding criminal justice data. Students take courses in 
seven broad areas identified by the BHE as essential for criminal 
justice programs: 1) Administration of Justice; 2) Crime Theory; 3) 
Law Enforcement; 4) Criminal Law; 5) Corrections; 6) Ethics; and 
7) Research and Analytic Methods. 



Required Courses Credits 

CRJU 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 

CRJU 331 Police, Community and Society 3 

CRJU 335 Criminal Law and the Courts 3 

CRJU 354 Corrections 3 

CRJU 406 Ethics and the Criminal Justice System 3 

CRJU 410 Applied Crime Theory in Criminal Justice 3 

(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum Requirement 

CWRM) 

CRJU 420 Research Methods in Criminal Justice 3 

CRJU 430 Analyzing Criminal Justice Data 3 

One course from the following 3 

CRJU 358 Race, Class, Crime and Justice 

CRJU 388 Hate Crime 

CRJU 404 Media, Justice and Crime 

CRJU 425 Comparative Crime and Deviance 
One course from the following 3 



CRJU 496 Seminar: Critical Issues in Crime and Justice 
CRJU 497 Research 

CRJU 498 Internship in Criminal Justice 
(only three credits will count toward the major) 

Elective Requirements 

Two courses from the following 6 

CRJU 213 The Juvenile Justice System 

CRJU/SOCI 227 Deviance and Social Control 

CRJU/SOCI 255 Juvenile Delinquency 

CRJU 323 Comparative Legal Systems in a Global Context 

CRJU 324 Law, Justice and Society 

CRJU 325 Political Theory and the Justice System 

CRJU 332 History of Policing in America 

CRJU 334 White Collar Crime 

CRJU/SOCI 339 Violence, Guns and Society 

CRJU 346 Criminal Procedure 

CRJU 347 Restorative Justice 

CRJU 358 Race, Class, Crime and Justice 

(if not taken above) 
CRJU 359 Technology and Crime Control 
CRJU 371 Sex Crime 

CRJU 381 Privatization in Criminal Justice 
CRJU 385 Victimology 
CRJU 388 Hate Crime (if not taken above) ■ 
CRJU 399 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (three credits 
only) 

CRJU 404 Media, Justice and Crime 

CRJU 406 Ethics and the Criminal Justice System 

CRJU 425 Comparative Crime and Deviance 

(if not taken above) 
CRJU 426 Ethnography and Crime Analysis 
CRJU 485 Honors Thesis 
PSYC 269 Psychology of Criminal Behavior 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/3S that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



89 



Criminal Justice 



Ib£c 



BKIIK 


• HWATER 


S 1 A 1 1 


COLLEGE 




Cognate Courses 

One course from the following 3 

ECON 325 The Economy of Crime 

HEAL 405 Drugs in Society 

PHIL 222 Philosophy of Law 

PHIL 403 Ethics and Action 

POLI 285 Law and the Judicial Process 

ECON 340 Law and Economics 

POLI 341 Constitutional Law and Politics: 

The Powers of Government 
POLI 342 Constitutional Law and Politics: 

The First Amendment 
POLI 343 Constitutional Law and Politics: 

Liberty and Equality 
POLI 344 Constitutional Law and Politics: 

The Rights of the Accused 
POLI 389 Racial Politics in the United States 
PSYC 269 Psychology of Criminal Behavior 

(if not taken as a criminal justice elective) 
PSYC 370 Abnormal Psychology 
PSYC 474 Forensic Psychology 
SOCI 228 Criminology 
SOCI 310 Women and Crime 
SOCI 313 Family Violence 

Total minimum credits: 39 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 120 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE MINOR 

The criminal justice minor consists of six courses (18 credits). 

The objective of the minor program is to provide a substantive 
area of study in criminal justice for students majoring in comple- 
mentary disciplines such as sociology, political science, social 
work, economics, anthropology or psychology. Criminal justice 
education includes the scientific study of crime and delinquency, 
law-making, punishment and the reintegration of the offender 
back into the community. Students in the minor program are 
required to take basic courses that will provide a theoretical and 
applied knowledge of the discipline. 

Credits 

Required criminal justice core courses 6 

CRJU 201 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

CRJU 410 Applied Crime Theory in Criminal Justice (Writing 

Intensive Major Core Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) 
Choose one course from the following 3 

CRJU 331 Police, Community and Society 

CRJU 335 Criminal Law and the Courts 

CRJU 354 Corrections 



Criminal Justice electives (choose any three courses) 9 

CRJU 213 The Juvenile Justice System 

CRJU/SOCI 227 Deviance and Social Control 

CRJU/SOCI 255 Juvenile Delinquency 

CRJU 323 Comparative Legal Systems in a Global Context 

CRJU 324 Law, Justice and Society 

CRJU 325 Political Theory and the Justice System 

CRJU 332 History of Policing in America 

CRJU/SOCI 334 White Collar Crime 

CRJU/SOCI 339 Violence, Guns and Society 

CRJU 346 Criminal Procedure 

CRJU 347 Restorative Justice 

CRJU 358 Race, Class, Crime and Justice 

CRJU 359 Technology and Crime Control 

CRJU 381 Privatization in Criminal Justice 

CRJU 385 Victimology 

CRJU 388 Hate Crime 

CRJU 399 Special Topics in Criminal Justice 

CRJU 404 Media, Justice and Society 

CRJU 425 Comparative Crime and Deviance 

CRJU 426 Ethnography and Crime Analysis 

CRJU 485 Honors Thesis 

PSYC 269 Psychology of Criminal Behavior 

SOCI 310 Women and Crime 

Total minimum credits: 18 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in criminal justice provides highly motivated 
criminal justice majors with opportunities to enhance their aca- 
demic program through intensive scholarly study and research 
designed to be of assistance in postgraduate employment or in 
the pursuit of an advanced degree. Contact the Department of 
Criminal Justice for further information concerning eligibility 
and application. 

OVERSEAS-STUDY OPPORTUNITIES 

The Department of Criminal Justice urges its majors and minors 
to study abroad, both via Bridgewater State College sponsored 
study tours and as exchange students at universities. The Office 
of International Programs can assist students. Any student con- 
templating study abroad should consult the department with all 
pertinent documentation. Final acceptance of credit will be deter- 
mined upon receipt of official transcripts and supporting material 
and, in some cases, may not be equivalent to the credits earned 
in a regular semester or year at Bridgewater State College. 



90 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Criminal Justice 



bSc 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE/MASTER OF 
SCIENCE - JOINT DEGREE PROGRAM 

Bridgewater State College offers a joint degree program. This 
151 -credit program leads to both a BS and a MS degree in 
criminal justice. 

Qualified criminal justice majors who have competitive GPAs 
and have earned 90 credits may apply to the joint degree pro- 
gram. Acceptance enables these students to take a combination 
of undergraduate and graduate courses beginning in their 
senior year. 

Students admitted into the joint degree program must com- 
plete all of the requirements for the Bachelor of Science and the 
Master of Science in criminal justice programs in order to receive 
both degrees simultaneously. 

This program is Quinn Bill-approved. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice provides students with 
the knowledge and skills necessary to succeed in a variety of 
professional positions in criminal justice or in closely related 
fields. Graduates from the program will also attain the academic 
background and proficiency necessary for admission into and 
completion of doctoral programs in criminal justice. Students in 
the program will acquire detailed knowledge of the seven broad 
areas of criminal justice, learn about the role of information tech- 
nology in the criminal justice system, become familiar with major 
data sources and learn to carry out research and data analysis 
in criminal justice. Students will also develop skills in critical 
thinking and in oral and written communications. In addition to 
providing a solid foundation in contemporary criminal justice, 
the program emphasizes diversity in criminal justice issues. 
Students may choose from two concentrations. The concentra- 
tion in administration of justice is offered in cooperation with 
the Master of Public Administration program. Students may also 
concentrate in crime and corrections. 

Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 based upon four years 
of course work 

• A composite score of 1000 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course 
work 

For more information, contact the program coordinator. 



The Master of Science in Criminal Justice requires comple- 
tion a minimum of 34 credit hours, including six required core 
courses (18 credits). Students take their remaining courses from 
departmental graduate courses as well as up to two approved 
graduate courses from outside of the department. The program 
includes a capstone requirement that may be satisfied with either 
a master's thesis (six credits) or a combination of a comprehen- 
sive examination and a master's project completed in a research 
seminar in criminal justice (CRJU 542 or CRJU 597). The depart- 
ment will offer one research seminar each year. 



Core Courses (required of all students) Credits 

CRJU 500 Foundations of Scholarship 1 

CRJU 504 Seminar: Crime, Justice and Society 3 

CRJU 505 Applications in Crime Theory 3 

CRJU 510 Research Methods in Criminal Justice 3 

CRJU 51 1 Analyzing Criminal Justice Data 3 

CRJU 512 Ethics and Policy in Criminal Justice 3 

Additional Courses 15 



CRJU 501 Structure and Process of the Criminal Justice 
System (strongly recommended for students who do 
not hold a bachelor's degree in criminal justice) 
CRJU 502 Research 
CRJU 503 Directed Study 
SOCI 514 Theories of Deviance 
CRJU 515 Criminal Justice Administration 
CRJU 517 Studies in Crime Prevention: Understanding 

What Works 
CRJU 518 Hate Crimes and Hate Groups 
CRJU 520 Violence, Crime and Society 
CRJU 521 Domestic Violence 
CRJU 522 Women and Criminal Justice 
CRJU 525 Comparative Crime and Justice 
CRJU 526 Communities, Cities and Crime 
CRJU 527 Policing in a Democratic Society 
CRJU 530 Introduction to Police Culture: An Intensive Review 
CRJU 540 Corrections, Crime and Society 
CRJU 541 Community-based Corrections 
CRJU 542 Research Seminar in Corrections (rotating topics) 
CRJU 546 Class, Race, Gender and Crime 
CRJU 550 Juvenile Justice and Society 
CRJU 551 Law and Society 

CRJU 555 Information Technology for Criminal Justice 
CRJU 557 Advanced Research Methods in Criminal Justice 
CRJU 597 Research Seminar in Criminal Justice 

(rotating topics) 
CRJU 598 Internship in Criminal Justice 
CRJU 599 Special Topics in Criminal Justice 

Capstone Requirement 

Either completion of a master's thesis (six credits) or a 
combination of a comprehensive exam and a master's 
project completed in a research seminar in criminal 
justice (CRJU 542 or CRJU 597) is required 3 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Criminal Justice 




Other Courses 

With the approval of the graduate coordinator, students 
may take up to two of these courses or other approved 
graduate courses: 

POLI 501 Introduction to Public Institutions 

and Administration 
POLI SOS Public Management 
POLI S1 1 Program Evaluation and Policy Analysis 

Total minimum credits: 34 

Optional Concentrations 

Students must take at least three courses in the concentration: 



Administration of Justice 

CRJU SIS Criminal Justice Administration 3 

POLI 501 Introduction to Public Institutions and 

Administration 3 

POLI 505 Public Management 3 

Total minimum credits: 43 

Crime and Corrections 

CRJU 540 Corrections, Crime and Society 3 

CRJU 541 Community-based Corrections 3 

CRJU 542 Research Seminar in Corrections 3 

Total minimum credits: 43 



92 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Earth Sciences 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Associate Professor Michael Krol 

Graduate Program Coordinator: Professor Jeffrey Williams 

Professors: Richard Enright, Peter Saccocia 

Associate Professor: Robert Cicerone 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1390 
Location: Conant Science Building, Room 308A 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/earthsciences/ 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BA in Earth Sciences 

• BS in Earth Sciences 

Concentrations: Environmental Geosciences, Geology 

• BS in Chemistry/Geology (offered jointly with the 
Department of Chemical Sciences) 

• MAT - Physical Sciences 

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• Earth Sciences 

• Geophysics* 

• Interdisciplinary Minor 



The Department of Earth Sciences offers several undergraduate 
programs in the earth and environmental sciences. Majors in 
the BS earth sciences program may elect a concentration in envi- 
ronmental geosciences or geology. The BA or BS earth science 
programs may also be taken as a double major with education. 
In addition, a program in chemistry-geology and a preprofes- 
sional program in oceanography are available. 

The earth sciences faculty have a wide range of expertise 
within the geosciences and are actively engaged in research. 
The department includes faculty with extensive background and 
experience in the realm of fieldwork, laboratory investigations, 
and theoretical work, including computer modeling. This diversity 
supports a modern curriculum and provides numerous opportuni- 
ties for students to extend their education beyond the confines of 
the traditional classroom. 

Departmental faculty collaborate with scientists from other 
academic institutions to increase the number and variety of 
research opportunities for students. One member of the fac- 
ulty is a guest investigator at the Woods Hole Oceanographic 
Institution. This appointment generates research opportunities 
for students in marine geochemistry, geology and oceanography 
and includes sea-going expeditions. Another faculty mem- 
ber collaborates with the Earth Resources Laboratory in the 
Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences at the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The latter collaboration 
creates student research opportunities in geophysics, which 
includes projects focused on earthquake generation. The research 
program of a third faculty member enables additional undergrad- 
uate research opportunities in the fields of petrology and tecton- 
ics with a focus on the geology of both the Appalachian and 
Rocky Mountains. The department also supports research within 



the realm of sedimentology and paleontology. This includes 
course-based research projects involving both field investigations 
and laboratory analysis of sediment transport and deposition, 
particularly within the coastal environment. 

The department has a long history of active engagement 
within the cutting-edge field of remote sensing and supports 
these activities with both traditional courses and numerous 
applied research opportunities. In this regard, the department 
has been selected as the only one in the state college system in 
Massachusetts to participate in the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration (NASA) sponsored Joint Venture (JOVE) 
program. This distinction led to collaborations with the Jet 
Propulsion Laboratory on remote sensing projects in Mexico, 
Alabama and Southeastern Massachusetts and the Goddard 
Space Flight Center on bolide impacts. Similar research projects, 
performed by both faculty and undergraduate students, are 
ongoing today. 

The department is committed to providing undergraduate stu- 
dents the opportunity to perform research with a faculty mentor. 
Each year, earth sciences students are involved in research and 
present their work at professional conferences organized by both 
regional and national geologic organizations. These opportuni- 
ties help to propel our students into rewarding careers and excel- 
lent graduate programs. 

Modern equipment supports the department's curriculum, 
including laboratory courses and undergraduate research proj- 
ects. This equipment includes: 1) an X-ray Diffractometer with 
powder cameras, 2) thin sectioning equipment; 3) new polarizing 
and stereoscopic microscopes; 4) a research grade Olympus 
polarizing microscope complete with a digital camera and image 
analysis software; 5) a proton procession magnetometer; 6) a 
seismic refraction unit; 7) an AS-I earthquake seismometer; 8) 
a Frantz Isodynamic Separator; 9) a 14-foot coastal research 
vessel; 10) a portable gamma-ray spectrometer; 1 1) a portable 
visible-near infrared spectroradiometer 12) a Sunsparc 20 UNIX 
work station; 13) a SunBlade 150 UNIX workstation; 14) GPS 
surveying equipment; and 1 5) groundwater and stream water 
sampling/monitoring equipment. 

Finally, our close relations with the Department of Chemical 
Sciences have facilitated access to more specialized instrumenta- 
tion used to investigate geochemical problems .This includes an 
atomic absorption spectrometer, an ultraviolet-visible spectro- 
photometer and a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer. 

In addition to course-related laboratory spaces, the depart- 
ment has several smaller specialized laboratories to support 
research activities. These include a well-equipped remote sens- 
ing laboratory, a geochemistry and petrology laboratory, a fine 
particle sedimentology laboratory, and extensive facilities for the 
preparation of rock samples for numerous analyses. 

Earth sciences faculty are using Bridgewater State College's 
sophisticated computer facilities for classroom instruction, 
including demonstrating and displaying Web-based and self- 
authored material and models. In a growing number of 
courses, students may submit assignments online, and in 
some courses, a majority of class time is spent in "virtual 
classrooms." To learn more, visit the department Web site 
atwww.bridgew.edu/depts/earthsciences/. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bndgew.edu/catalog/dddenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



93 



Earth Sciences 



The department boasts an active Earth Sciences and 
Geography Club that sponsors both local (Museum of 
Comparative Zoology at Harvard University), regional (New 
Hampshire's White Mountains), national (Hawaii), and interna- 
tional (Canada, Iceland. Mexico) field trips. Students may also 
qualify for Sigma Gamma Epsilon, the national earth science 
honor society. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



EARTH SCIENCES MAJOR 

The major in earth sciences is a solid, broad-based program that 
provides the student with an understanding and appreciation 
of the physical aspects of the earth and earth processes. Career 
opportunities for graduates exist in federal, state and local 
government service, industry and environmental studies both 
with regulatory agencies and consulting firms. Teaching in the 
elementary, middle and secondary schools is another option. 
Many of our earth science majors have been awarded full fel- 
lowships at leading graduate schools. In addition, the faculty 
have an extensive program of undergraduate research, and 
many students have presented the results of their undergraduate 
research at various national meetings. Some of this research has 
been funded, and students are encouraged to contact the faculty 
if interested. Internships are also available for those students 
desiring to prepare themselves for employment upon graduation. 
Interested students are encouraged to contact the earth science/ 
geology faculty - Drs. Cicerone, Enright, Krol, and Saccocia - for 
more information about earth science/geology programs. 



EARTH SCIENCES MAJOR - 
BACHELOROFARTS Credits 

EASC 100 Physical Geology 4 

EASC 101 Historical Geology 4 

EASC 210 Oceanography 3 

EASC 215 Solar System Astronomy 3 

EASC 280 Vertebrate Paleontology 3 

EASC 320 Geology of New England 3 

EASC 400 Earth Systems Science 1 3 

EASC 410 Earth Systems Science II 3 

GEOG 221 Meteorology 3 

Earth Science Elective 

One earth science elective course at the 200, 300, 

or 400 level 3 

Cognate Courses 

MATH 100 Precalculus Mathematics (or equivalent passing 
score on the mathematics placement test) 3 

CHEM 102 Chemistry in Everyday Life 3 

or 

CHEM 131 Survey of Chemistry I 
Any one biology or physics course 3 



Grade Requirement 

Not more than one grade of "D" in the major, taught in the 
department, shall be accepted to fulfill the requirements for 

this program. 

Total minimum credits: 41 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



EARTH SCIENCES MAJOR - BACHELOR 



OF SCIENCE Credits 
Earth Science Core Courses 

EASC 100 Physical Geology 4 

EASC 101 Historical Geology 4 

EASC 210 Oceanography 3 

EASC 215 Solar System Astronomy 3 

EASC 240 Hydrology 4 

EASC 250 Geomorphology 4 

EASC 280 Vertebrate Paleontology 3 

EASC 320 Geology of New England 3 

EASC 400 Earth Systems Science 1 3 

EASC 410 Earth Systems Science II 3 

GEOG 221 Meteorology 

Additional Earth Science Course 

One earth science elective course at the 200, 300, 

or 400 level 3 

Cognate Courses 

CHEM 141-142 Chemical Principles I and II 8 

PHYS 181-182 Elements of Physics I and II 8 

or 

PHYS 243-244 General Physics I and II 

MATH 141-142 Elements of Calculus I and II 6 

or 

MATH 151-152 Calculus I and II 
Grade Requirement 



Not more than one grade of "D" for a course in the major, taught 
in the department, shall be accepted to fulfill the requirements 
for this program. 

Total minimum credits: 62 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



94 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Earth Sciences 



ENVIRONMENTAL GEOSCIENCES 
CONCENTRATION 

This concentration is designed to provide students with a funda- 
mental understanding of earth processes as well as the specific 
tools they will employ as environmental geoscience profession- 
als. Career opportunities for graduates exist in federal, state and 
local government service, industry and environmental studies 
both with regulatory agencies and consulting firms. The selection 
of appropriate elective courses within the major as well as in the 
cognate disciplines of biology and chemistry will prepare the stu- 
dent for environmental work related to the detection and moni- 
toring of pollutants as well as for remediation of affected areas. 

Credits 



EASC 100 Physical Geology 4 

EASC 101 Historical Geology 4 

EASC 240 Hydrology 4 

EASC 250 Geomorphology 4 

EASC 260 Mineralogy 4 

EASC 350 Structural Geology 4 

EASC 370 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy 4 

EASC 496 Seminar in Geology 1 

Plus a minimum of four other earth science courses selected 
with the written concurrence of the adviser. 
Other courses may be added or approved as substitutes 

with approval of the adviser 12 

Minimum cognate requirements include: 

MATH 141-142 Elements of Calculus l-ll 6 

or 

MATH 151-152 Calculus l-ll 

CHEM 131-132 Survey of Chemistry l-ll 7 

or 

CHEM 141-142 Chemical Principles l-ll 

PHYS 181-182 Elements of Physics l-ll 8 

or 

PHYS 243-244 General Physics l-ll 
or 

Two approved biology courses 6 



Students are also encouraged to take the following courses: 

BIOL 117 The Biological Environment 

BIOL 225 Ecology 

BIOL 327 Wetlands Biology 

CHEM 343-344 Organic Chemistry l-ll 

ENGL 201 Technical Writing I 

Total minimum credits: 62 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 120 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



GEOLOGY CONCENTRATION 

The most comprehensive of all of the earth science programs 
within the commonwealth, this concentration provides students 
with an understanding of the physical and chemical aspects of 
the earth and its internal as well as surface processes. Career 
opportunities for graduates exist in federal, state and local gov- 
ernment service, industry and environmental studies both with 
regulatory agencies and consulting firms. With the selection of 
appropriate electives, students will be prepared for government 
service, for environmental work related to the detection and 
monitoring of pollutants as well as for remediation of affected 
areas, and for careers in such fields as environmental geology, 
mining or petroleum geology and hydrology. This concentration 
gives students a solid background in geology and the cognate 
sciences required to successfully pursue graduate work at 
leading universities. 



EARTH SCIENCE MAJOR WITH GEOLOGY 
CONCENTRATION - BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Earth Sciences Core Courses Credits 

EASC 100 Physical Geology 4 

EASC 101 Historical Geology 4 

EASC 250 Geomorphology 4 

EASC 260 Mineralogy 4 

EASC 350 Structural Geology 4 

EASC 360 Petrology 4 

EASC 370 Sedimentology and Stratigraphy 4 

EASC 470 Paleontology 4 

Additional Earth Science Courses 

EASC 240 Hydrology 4 

EASC 450 Geochemistry 4 

or 

EASC 460 Geophysics 
EASC 490 Field Methods in Geology 4 

Earth Science Elective 

(any other earth science course at or above EASC 450) 3 

Cognate Courses 

CHEM 141-142 Chemical Principles I and II 8 

PHYS 181-182 Elements of Physics I and II 8 

or 

PHYS 243-244 General Physics I and II 

MATH 141-142 Elements of Calculus I and II 6 

or 

MATH 151-152 Calculus I and II 
Grade Requirement 



Not more than one "D" for an Earth Science (EASC) course shall 
be accepted to fulfill the requirements for this program. 

Total minimum credits: 69 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



95 



Earth Sciences 



BRItK.FWAUR 

STATfc ooun 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 
EARTH SCIENCES 

This program is inactive. 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

This program is inactive. 



Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bndgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

CHEMISTRY-GEOLOGY MAJOR 

A major in chemistry geology is offered jointly with the 

Department of Chemical Sciences. See the catalog section PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

"Interdisciplinary and Preprofessional Programs" for details. The MAT in Physical Science degree was developed for high 
school and middle school subject area teachers who have an ini- 

EARTH SCIENCES MINOR Credits t ' a ' '' cense ' n cnem ' str y. ear th science or physics and are seeking 

. . . . .a professional license in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

ASC 100 Physical Geology 4 m MAT prQgram |$ defme(J {Q meet the - appropriate master - s 

EASC 101 Historical Geology 4 d . requ ,rement, which is part of the criteria for professional 

Four additional earth sciences courses |jcensure as set forth m the mQSt recem Massachusetts 

(departmental approval required) .... 12 Department of Elementary and Secondary Educat.on licensure 

Total minimum credits: 20 regu | ations 

rPHDUVQirc MINOR Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 

UtUrn YdIv.3 rvilNUK section of this catalog for information regarding program policy 

A minor in geophysics is jointly offered with the Department anc j procedures. 

of Phys.cs. For further information, contact the department For currem jnformation concerning program requ.rements, 

chairpersons. consu l t the » Physjcs » sectlon of this cata)og 



MINOR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 
(HIGH SCHOOL, MIDDLE SCHOOL OR 
PreK-12 SPECIALIST) 

Students may minor in secondary education (high school, middle 
school or PreK-12 specialist). Successful completion of this 
minor will lead to Massachusetts Initial Teacher Licensure. 
Please refer to the "Department of Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs" for specific teacher licensure and pro- 
gram requirements. 

DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION OR SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major in earth sciences and 
elementary education, early childhood education or special 
education for licensure purposes. Please contact the Department 
of Earth Sciences and the appropriate education department for 
further information. 



96 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Associate Professor John Kucich 

Graduate Program Coordinator: 

Assistant Professor Kathleen Vejvoda 

Professors: Charles Angell, Thomas Curley, Evelyn Pezzulich, 
Lois Poule, Jadwiga Smith, Judith Stanton 

Associate Professors: Michael Boyd, Anne Doyle, 
Michael Hurley, Julia Stakhnevich 

Assistant Professors: Stuart Allen, Joyce Anderson, 
Matthew Bell, Benjamin Carson, Gregory Chaplin, 
James Crowley, Michelle Cox, Kimberly Davis, 
Kathryn Evans, Michael McClintock, John Mulrooney, 
John Sexton, Jerald Walker 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1258 
Location: Tillinghast Hall, Room 339 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/English 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BA in English 

Concentrations: English Education (High School, Middle 
School), Writing 

• MA in English 
Concentration: Creative Writing 

• MAT - English 



UNDERGRADUATE MINOR 

• English 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The program of study for English majors aims to enhance their 
appreciation and knowledge of literature and the writing process. 
Through exposure to significant literary works and to the tools for 
understanding and analyzing what they read and write, students 
will develop an understanding of the history and background of 
English-language literatures, including texts in translation central 
to the discipline. Course work in the major includes offerings in 
culturally diverse English-language literatures with a foundation 
in British and American traditions, embracing the writing process 
and critical analysis. This background prepares English majors to 
enter diverse careers or to pursue graduate study. Bridgewater 
State College English majors have achieved success in a wide 
variety of occupations including teaching, banking, law, medi- 
cine, publishing, government service, public relations, technical 
writing, creative writing, advertising and business administration. 

Within the English major, students may also pursue a writ- 
ing concentration or combine their program with licensure in 
elementary, middle school or secondary education. 

The department offers an honors program for students who 
wish to pursue independent study culminating in a thesis. 



The department participates in interdisciplinary minors such 
as American Studies, Canadian Studies, Irish-American Studies, 
Women's Studies and Ethnic Studies. 



ENGLISH MAJOR 

Grade Requirement 

Majors must achieve a grade of "C" or above in ENGL 101 
Writing I and ENGL 102 Writing II. Credit earned for ENGL 101 
and ENGL 102 may not be applied to the major. 

The Department of English will permit a major to use only one 
passing grade below "C-" to satisfy requirements in the English 
major. An additional grade below "C-" will require the major to 
take another English course. 

The major must earn 36 credits in English, which must 
include three semester hours in each of the following: 

Credits 

ENGL 203 Writing About Literature 

(must be taken early in the major) 3 

ENGL 211 Literary Classics of Western Civilization to 1600 3 

or 

ENGL 221 Major British Writers to 1800 (also satisfies 
requirement for English literature before 1800. Credits 
are only applied once.) 

English literature before 1800 (choose one course) 3 

ENGL 320 Chaucer 

ENGL 321 The Age of Pope 1660-1740 

ENGL 322 The Age of Johnson 1740-1800 

ENGL 335 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama 

ENGL 340 Literature of the English Renaissance 

ENGL 341 Literature of the Continental Renaissance 

ENGL 342 Shakespeare: Histories and Comedies 

ENGL 343 Shakespeare: Tragedies and Late Plays 

ENGL 360 The English Novell 

ENGL 370 Seventeenth-Century Literature 

ENGL 380 Milton 
English literature after 1800 (choose one course) 3 

ENGL 312 Modern British Fiction 

ENGL 350 Recent British Fiction 

ENGL 354 Twentieth-Century British Drama 

ENGL 361 The English Novel II 

ENGL 365 Victorian Prose and Poetry 

ENGL 367 English Literature of the Late Victorian 
and Edwardian Periods 

ENGL 377 Post-Colonial Literature and Theory 

ENGL 381 Irish Literature I 

ENGL 382 Irish Literature II 

ENGL 386 English Romantic Poets 

ENGL 393 Modern British Poetry 
American literature (choose one course) 3 

ENGL 309 Early American Literature, Beginnings to 1820 

ENGL 315 Ethnic American Literature 

ENGL 317 African-American Literature I 

ENGL 318 African-American Literature II 

ENGL 329 Modern American Fiction 

ENGL 330 Recent American Fiction 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



English 



ENGL 331 U.S. Literature in the Nineteenth Century I 

ENGL 332 U.S. Literature in the Nineteenth Century II 

ENGL 333 Realism and Naturalism 

ENGL 346 Southern Literature 

ENGL 356 Modern American Drama 

ENGL 357 Recent American Drama 

ENGL 394 Modern American Poetry 

ENGL 395 Studies in Recent American Poetry 

A seminar (generally taken during the senior year) 

Choose one seminar 3 

Note: Each of these courses also fulfill the Writing 
Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 
Requirement-CWRM 
ENGL 494 Seminar: Special Topics 
ENGL 495 Seminar: British Literature and Culture 
ENGL 496 Seminar: American Literature and Culture 
ENGL 497 Seminar: World Literatures and Cultures 

18 additional credits in English electives 18 

Topical courses may fulfill some of the above requirements. 

Topics are designated in the Course Schedule. 

No more than six hours of 200 level literature courses can be 
credited toward the major. The six-hour limit in literature does 
not apply to 200-level writing courses or 200-level film courses 
in the Department of English. 

Credit for ENGL 498 Internship in English may not be applied to 
the requirements of the major. 

Total minimum credits: 36 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 120 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

WRITING CONCENTRATION 

The writing concentration is designed to offer a student super- 
vised writing throughout the college career. Students may 
select courses which emphasize applied writing (technical and 
business writing), creative writing or the teaching of writing. 

As part of the 36 credits required for the major, students take 
1 2 credits in the writing concentration. 

Requirements Credits 

Nine additional credit hours in English electives chosen from the 

following 9 

ENGL 200 Personal and Public Writing 

ENGL 201 Technical Writing I 

ENGL 202 Business Communication 

ENGL 204 Responding to Writing 

ENGL 227 Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop 

ENGL 228 FictionWriting Workshop 

ENGL 229 PoetryWriting Workshop 

ENGL 230 Creative Writing 

ENGL 280 The Journalistic Essay 



ENGL 301 Writing and the Teaching of Writing 
ENGL 302 Technical Writing II 

ENGL 371 Advanced Creative Nonfiction Writing Workshop 

ENGL 389 Topics in Writing 

ENGL 390 Theories in Writing 

ENGL 392 Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop 

ENGL 396 Rhetoric and Style 

ENGL 489 Advanced Portfolio Workshop 3 

Topical courses may fulfill some of the above requirements. 
Topics are designated in the Course Schedule. 
No more than six hours of 200-level literature courses can be 
credited toward the major. The six-hour limit in literature does 
not apply to 200-level writing courses or 200-level film courses 
in the Department of English. 

Credit for ENGL 498 Internship in English may not be applied to 

Total minimum credits: 36 



the requirements of the major. 



Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 120 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

ENGLISH EDUCATION CONCENTRATION 
- HIGH SCHOOL/MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Students may minor in secondary (high school, grades 8- 1 2 or 
middle school, grades 5-8) education. Successful completion of 
this program will lead to Massachusetts Initial Teacher Licensure. 
Students must complete either the English education concentra- 
tion for high school or middle school. Students should also refer 
to the "Department of Secondary Education and Professional 
Programs" for specific teacher licensure and minor requirements. 

Required Courses Credits 

ENGL 203 Writing about Literature 3 

Choose one course from the following courses 3 

ENGL 211 Literary Classics of Western Civilization to 1600 

ENGL 221 Major British Writers to 1800 (also satisfies 
area requirement for English Literature before 1800. 
Credits only applied once.) 
Choose one course from the following courses 3 

ENGL 253 Non-Western Literature 

ENGL 315 Ethnic American Literature 

ENGL 317 African American Literature I 

ENGL 318 African American Literature II 
Choose one course from the following courses 3 

ENGL 327 Women Writers: The Female Tradition to 1900 

ENGL 328 Women Writers: The Female Tradition since 1900 
Choose one course from the following courses 3 

ENGL 320 Chaucer 

ENGL 321 The Age of Pope: 1660-1740 
ENGL 322 The Age of Johnson: 1740-1800 
ENGL 335 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama 
ENGL 340 Literature of the English Renaissance 



98 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



English 




ENGL 341 Literature of the Continental Renaissance 
ENGL 342 Shakespeare: Histories and Comedies 
ENGL 343 Shakespeare: Tragedies and Late Plays 
ENGL 360 The English Novell 
ENGL 370 Seventeenth-Century Literature 
ENGL 380 Milton 

Choose one course from the following courses 3 

ENGL 312 Modern British Fiction " 

ENGL 350 Recent British Fiction 

ENGL 354 Twentieth-Century British Drama 

ENGL 361 The English Novel II 

ENGL 365 Victorian Prose and Poetry 

ENGL 367 English Literature of the Late 

Victorian and Edwardian Periods 
ENGL 381 Irish Literature I 
ENGL 382 Irish Literature II 
ENGL 386 English Romantic Poets 
ENGL 393 Modern British Poetry 



Choose one course from the following courses 3 

ENGL 261 Film Study: Introduction to the Art 

ENGL 262 Film Study: Literature and Film 
Choose one course from the following courses 3 

ENGL 305 History of the English Language 

ENGL 323 Introduction to Linguistics 
Choose one course from the following courses 3 



ENGL 309 Early American Literature, Beginnings to 1820 

ENGL 331 U.S. Literature in the Nineteenth Century I 

ENGL 332 U.S. Literature in the Nineteenth Century II 

ENGL 333 Realism and Naturalism 
Choose one course from the following courses 3 

ENGL 329 Modern American Fiction 

ENGL 330 Recent American Fiction 

ENGL 346 Southern Literature 

ENGL 356 Modern American Drama 

ENGL 394 Modern American Poetry 

ENGL 395 Studies in Recent American Poetry 

ENGL 301 Writing and the Teaching of Writing 3 

Choose one seminar from below 3 

Note: Each of these courses also fulfills the Writing 
Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum Requirement 
-CWRM. 

ENGL 494 Seminar: Special Topics 
ENGL 495 Seminar: British Literature and Culture 
ENGL 496 Seminar: American Literature and Culture 
ENGL 497 Seminar: World Literatures and Cultures 

Additional required course 3 

LIBR 420 Young Adult Literature 

Total minimum credits: 39 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 120 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION OR SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major in English and elementary 
education, early childhood education or special education for 
licensure purposes. Appropriate advising materials with sug- 
gested course sequences are available. 



ENGLISH MINOR 

Traditionally considered the province of liberal arts majors, the 
English minor also offers a suitable option for students majoring 
in such specialized technical and professional fields as computer 
science, social sciences, behavioral sciences and management 
science. Eighteen credits in English are required with at least nine 
credits in courses at the 300 level or above. The remaining nine 
credits may be taken in courses at the 200 level or above. Credit 
earned for ENGL 101 Writing I and ENGL 102 Writing II may not 
be applied toward the minor. 

Total minimum credits: 18 



HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in English provides highly motivated English 
majors with opportunities to enhance their academic program 
through intensive scholarly study and research designed to be of 
assistance in postgraduate employment or in the pursuit of an 
advanced degree in English. Contact the Department of English 
for further information concerning eligibility and application. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



MASTER OF ARTS 

The Master of Arts degree in English (MA) is designed for stu- 
dents pursuing advanced studies in English. Candidates in this 
degree program come from varied academic backgrounds. Some 
simply want to extend their undergraduate background and 
complete an MA in English, while others are destined for a PhD 
and a college teaching career. A number of our MA students are 
already certified teachers in private or public schools and want 
an advanced degree in English for professionaPreasons. Finally, 
a small number simply want to acquire the MA as an end in and 
of itself. 

Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 
yearsof work or a 3.0 undergraduate degree GPA based 
upon work completed in the junior and senior years 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• An undergraduate major in English, with at least 24 credits 
in the discipline, is generally required for admission to this 
program. Students with deficient academic backgrounds are 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/dddenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



99 



English 



sometimes accepted into the program with the stipulation 
that these deficiencies be made up before work actually 
credited to the degree program begins 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course 
work 

Degree Requirements 

Thirty-three credits at the 500 level distributed as follows: 

Credits 

ENGL 500 Introduction to Graduate Study in English 

(To be taken early in the student's program) 3 

Three courses in literary periods, figures or genres 9 

One course in ethnic or culturally diverse literature 3 

One course in literary theory 3 

One course in writing 3 

Two elective courses in literature and/or writing 6 

The remaining course requirements (six credits) can be satisfied 
by completing one of the following two research options: 

Thesis Option 

Students who choose this option will research and write a thesis, 
a work of independent scholarship, which demonstrates their 
ability to apply the knowledge and scholarly tools acquired dur- 
ing their degree work. Students who want to pursue doctoral 
work in English are strongly encouraged to choose the thesis 
option. Those who choose to write a thesis should consult the 
graduate coordinator and adviser to select a thesis director and 
committee, then write a thesis proposal, and register for ENGL 
502 Research (six credits). The thesis must be fully accepted by 
the thesis director and thesis committee. 

Non-Thesis Option 

Students who choose not to write a thesis must complete the 
non-thesis option by fulfilling both of the following requirements: 

• Students must enroll in two additional three-credit 500-level 
elective courses in literature and/or writing (total 6 credits). 

• Students are also required to submit two long seminar papers 
for evaluation by the Graduate Committee. For this purpose 
students should select their two best seminar papers written 
during their graduate program of study. These papers should 
be clean, i.e., without the professors' comments and grades. 
Subject to the acceptance by the Graduate Committee, the 
seminar papers will be placed in the student's folder in the 
department. 

Total minimum credits: 33 
Additional Degree Requirements 

A Foreign Language Reading Proficiency Test (An intermedi- 
ate-level reading/translation test in a foreign language of the 
student's choice, the student may use a foreign language 
dictionary during the test.) 

A Comprehensive Examination (taken after course work 
is completed) 



MASTER OF ARTS 

Creative Writing Concentration 

This program is designed to provide students with the intense 
study of the art and craft of creative writing. Students who intend 
to pursue the MFA in English, a career in editing or journalism, or 
wish to explore their potential as a professional writer will find 
this option particularly beneficial. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to the admission requirements for the Master of Arts 
in English, students who wish to pursue the creative writing 
concentration must also submit a creative writing sample. Poets 
should submit 1 to 1 2 poems. Prose writers should submit 
between 20 and 40 pages of fiction or creative fiction. 

Students not admitted specifically for the creative writing 
concentration but who wish to change to this concentration must 
obtain approval from the creative writing faculty who would 
serve as his or her thesis director. 

Degree Requirements 

Thirty-three credits at the 500 level distributed as follows: 

Credits 

ENGL 500 Introduction to Graduate Study in English 

(To be taken early in the student's program) 3 

Three courses in literary periods, figures or genres 9 

One course in ethnic or culturally diverse literature 3 

One course in literary theory 3 

Two courses in creative writing 6 

One elective course in literature or writing or 

three internship credits 3 

A foreign language reading proficiency test 
The remaining course requirements (six credits) must be satis- 
fied by completing a creative thesis (ENGL 502) 6 

Total minimum credits: 33 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 
ENGLISH 

Program for teachers who have, or are seeking, 
professional licensure 

The Master of Arts in Teaching degree in English (MAT) was 
developed for high school and middle school English teachers. 
Specifically, the MAT is designed for secondary school teachers 
who have initial licensure and are seeking professional licensure 
in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The MAT program is 
designed to meet the "appropriate master's degree" require- 
ment, which is part of the criteria for professional stage licensure, 
as set forth in the most recent MA DESE licensure regulations. 
Also, this degree program will appeal to high school and middle 
school English teachers who already have standard certification 
or a professional license and simply want to acquire additional 
knowledge and a graduate degree in the discipline. Graduate 
students in the MAT will complete courses in both English and 
education. Advising will be done by full-time members of the 
graduate faculty in the Department of English. 



100 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



English 



Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 
years of work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon work 
completed during the junior and senior years 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
partsof the GRE General Test 

• An initial teaching license 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

Degree Requirements 

Thirty-four credits at the 500 level distributed as follows: 

Credits 



Eighteen credits in English 

ENGL 500 Introduction to Graduate Study in English 3 

Two courses in literary periods, figures or genres 6 

One course in writing 3 

One course in ethnic and culturally diverse literature 3 

One elective course in literature or writing 3 

Fifteen credits in secondary education 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

EDMC 531 The Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 3 

EDMC 532 The Teacher as Leader: From Issues 

to Advocacy 3 

EDMC 533 The Standards-Based Classroom: 

Instruction and Assessment for Diverse Learners 3 

EDMC 538 The Professional Teacher 

(final program course) 3 



Total minimum credits: 33 
A comprehensive examination administered by the Department 
of English 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

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101 



Foreign Languages 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Associate Professor Fernanda Ferreira 

Professors: Leora Lev, Margaret Snook 

Associate Professors: Duilio Ayalamacedo, 
Atandra Mukhopadhyay 

Instructor: Minae Savas 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1279 
Location: Tillinghast Hall, Room 317 
Web site: 

www.bridgew.edu/catalog/foreignlanguage 



DEGREE PROGRAM 

BA in Spanish 

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

Portuguese 
Spanish 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The Department of Foreign Languages offers students an oppor- 
tunity to gain practical working knowledge of one or more of 
1 foreign languages. Students may choose any of these 1 
languages offered by the department unless otherwise advised 
by the requirements of their academic major. Students who are 
continuing the study of foreign languages at Bridgewater State 
College should do so at the earliest opportunity. 

The department offers an undergraduate major and minor in 
Spanish, as well as a minor in Portuguese. 

To maintain good standing, only grades of "C-" or better are 
allowed in each major course and in LANG 324 and EDHM 424. 
Thirty-six semester hours are required for a Spanish major. 

For all prerequisites, equivalent course credit or preparation 
will be considered. 

The Department of Foreign Languages participates in the 
multidisciplinary minor in Canadian Studies, the Latin American 
and Caribbean Studies minor, the Women's and Gender Studies 
minor and the Asian Studies minor. For specific information on 
these programs, consult the catalog section "Interdisciplinary 
and Preprofessional Programs." 

SPANISH MAJOR 

Required Courses Credits 

LASP 200 Intermediate Spanish II 3 

Elective Courses 

Eleven courses (33 credits) must be 

chosen from the following 33 

LASP 252 Reading in Spanish 

LASP 271 Patterns of the Spanish Language 



LASP 281 Spanish Conversation 

LASP 290 Spanish Phonetics and Dialectology 

LASP 300 Spanish Composition 

LASP 301 The Golden Age of Spanish Literature 

LASP 310 Contemporary Latin American Short Story 

LASP 320 Latin American Poetry 

LASP 350 Gender, Sexuality and Politics in Hispanic Cinema 

LASP 351 Cervantes 

LASP 381 The Middle Ages 

LASP 391 Spanish Civilization 

LASP 392 Spanish-American Civilization 

LASP 400 Survey of Spanish Literature 

LASP 401 Topics in Spanish Literature 

LASP 402 Survey of Spanish-American Literature 

LASP 403 Topics in Spanish-American Literature 

LASP 404 Nineteenth Century Spanish Literature 

LASP 410 Latin American Novel: Early Twentieth Century 

LASP 420 The Contemporary Latin American Novel 

LASP 451 Twentieth Century Spanish Literature 

LASP 490 Seminar in Hispanic Literature 

LASP 495 Seminar in Spanish-American Literature 

A maximum of three credits in LANG 498 Internship in Foreign 

Languages may be substituted for one course above with 

departmental approval. 

Students interested in enrolling in LANG 499 Directed Study 
in Foreign Language should apply and receive approval by their 
adviser and the department chairperson prior to the semester in 
which they intend to register. Directed study is limited to a maxi- 
mum of six credits. 

The following courses are not applicable towards the 
Spanish major: 

LASP 210 Latin American Poetry in Translation 
LASP 220 The Contemporary Latin American Novel in 

English Translation 
LASP 230 Contemporary Latin American Short Story in 

Translation 

Courses with a LANG subject code (with the exception 
of LANG 498 and LASP 499 with approval) 

Total minimum credits: 36 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

SACHEM consortium courses and study abroad are avail- 
able for transfer purposes. See the "Undergraduate Academic 
Experience" of this catalog for further information. 

The Spanish major sequence is not available in the 
evening hours. 



102 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Foreign Languages 



DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION OR SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major in Spanish and elementary 
education, early childhood education or special education for 
licensure purposes. Advising on appropriate course sequences 
is available. 



PORTUGUESE MINOR 

Students can take the following two courses, or place directly 
into LAPO 102 based on the Portuguese Placement Exam. 



Basic Language Courses Credits 

LAPO 101 Elementary Portuguese 1 3 

LAPO 102 Elementary Portuguese II 3 

Core Courses 

LAPO 151 Intermediate Portuguese 1 3 

LAPO 152 Intermediate Portuguese II 3 

LAPO 252 Reading in Portuguese 3 

LAPO 271 Review of Portuguese Grammar 3 

Additional required course 

Students must choose one of the following courses: 

LAPO 272 Portuguese Composition 3 

or 

LAPO 281 Portuguese Conversation 



Total minimum credits: 18 



SPANISH MINOR 

Spanish minors are required to take 18 semester hours in the for- 
eign language, which may include the 101-102 level. The choice 
of subsequent courses may be determined in consultation with 
the department head. 

A maximum of three credits earned in a Spanish course taught 
in English may be applied toward the Spanish minor. Spanish 
courses taught in English include: 

LASP 350 Gender, Sexuality, and Politics in Hispanic Cinema 

The following courses are not applicable toward the Spanish 
minor: 

LASP 210 Latin American Poetry in Translation 
LASP 220 The Contemporary Latin American Novel in English 
Translation 

LASP 230 Contemporary Latin American Short Story in 

Translation 
LANG 300 Languages of the World 
Courses with a LANG subject code (with the exception of 

LANG 498) 

Total minimum credits: 18 



MINOR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 

The minor in secondary education for licensure as a Teacher of 
Foreign Language (Spanish) 5-12 is inactive. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT 

Students who would like to continue the study of foreign 
languages at Bridgewater State College should do so at the 
earliest opportunity. 

With the exception of advanced-placement foreign language 
courses and foreign language College-Level Examination 
Program (CLEP) exams, credit may not be granted to students 
exempt from one to two semesters because of study of three or 
more secondary levels of the same foreign language or because 
of a placement score. Students whose total credit hours fall 
below the minimum 1 20 required for graduation due to a foreign 
language exemption would need to take additional free elective 
course work to meet this graduation requirement. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE PLACEMENT POLICY 

Foreign Language Courses 

Students who would like to continue the study of foreign lan- 
guages at Bridgewater State College should do so at the earliest 
opportunity. Foreign language courses count for the Global 
Culture and Humanities requirements of the core curriculum. 

With the exception of advanced placement, foreign language 
courses, and foreign language College-Level Examination 
Program (CLEP) exams, credit may not be granted to students 
exempt from one to two semesters because of study of three of 
more secondary levels of the same foreign language or because 
of placement score. 

Foreign Language Placement Policy 

If you have completed four levels of foreign language 
in high school 

• you must take the Foreign Language Placement Exam for 
higher placement in the same language or see the depart- 
ment chairperson of the Department of Foreign Languages if 
you wish to continue in the same language for which a place- 
ment testis not offered. 

• you may begin a new foreign language at the 101 level. 

If you have completed three levels of foreign language 
in high school 

• you must take the Foreign Language Placement Exam for 
higher placement only. You may begin a new foreign lan- 
guage at the 101 level. 

If it has been two or more years since you completed 
three levels of foreign language in high school 

• you must take the Foreign Language Placement Exam and 

you may take 101 for credit if the exam places you in 

101. 

• you may begin a new foreign language at the 101 level. 

If you are a transfer student from another college or 
university and 

• you took a foreign language at your previous institution, 
your transfer credits will be assessed upon admission to 
Bridgewater State College. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

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103 



bJsc 

IIHI1M.I * M I H 

STATE COLLBGB 



Foreign Languages 



• you did not take a foreign language at your previous institu- 
tion; your remaining foreign language requirement (should 
there be one) will be determined by the result of the Foreign 
Language Placement Exam. 

If your situation does not fit one of the categories 
above 

• contact the Department of Foreign Languages, Tillinghast 
Hall, Room 340, 508.531.1379, for additional assistance. 

Students who were exempt from foreign language study in 
high school or at previous colleges must go through a formal 
process to request a substitution of the foreign language 
requirement in certain majors at Bridgewater State College. 
Students with appropriate documentation should meet with 
the learning disabilities specialist or the disability resources 
coordinator as early as possible to receive information on the 
process requirements. 

Students who were exempt from foreign language study in 
high school or at previous colleges must go through a formal 
process to request a substitution of the foreign language 
requirement in certain majors at Bridgewater State College. 
Students with appropriate documentation should meet with 
the learning disabilities specialist or the disability resources 
coordinator as early as possible to receive information on the 
process requirements. 



HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in Spanish provides highly motivated 
Spanish majors with opportunities to enhance their academic 
program through intensive scholarly study and research designed 
to be of assistance in postgraduate employment or in the pursuit 
of an advanced degree in Spanish. Contact the Department of 
Foreign Languages for further information concerning eligibility 
and application. 



OVERSEAS-STUDY OPPORTUNITIES 

The Department of Foreign Languages urges its majors and 
minors to study abroad and can offer information on available 
study plans. The International and Exchange Programs Office and 
the Office of Student Affairs can assist students. Any student con- 
templating study abroad should consult the department with all 
pertinent documentation. Final acceptance of credit will be deter- 
mined upon receipt of official transcripts and supporting material 
and, in some cases, may not be equivalent to the credits earned 
in a regular semester or year at Bridgewater State College. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 

This program is inactive. 

Students interested in obtaining Massachusetts initial 
licensure should refer in this catalog to the program entitled 
"Accelerated Postbaccalaureate Program (APB): Initial Licensure 
for High School (Subject Areas: 8-12), Middle Level (Subject 
Areas: 5-8) and PreK- 1 2 Specialists under "Secondary Education 
and Professional Programs." 



104 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Geography 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Professor Sandra Clark 

Graduate Program Coordinator: Professor Jeffery Williams 

Professor: Vernon Domingo 

Associate Professors: James Hayes-Bohanan, 
Robert Hellstrom, Madhusudana Rao 

Assistant Professors: Robert Amey, Darcy Boellstorff 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1390 
Location: Conant Science Building, Room 310 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/geography 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BA in Geography 

• BS in Geography 

• MAT - Physical Sciences 

UNDERGRADUATE MINOR 

• Geography 

The Department of Geography offers an undergraduate major 
in geography. Majors in geography may elect a concentration 
in environmental geography, geotechnology or regional and 
economic planning or double major with education. In addition, 
programs in chemistry-geology, oceanography and urban affairs 
and planning are available. The department is also active in the 
Asian studies minor, the Canadian studies minor, the Russian 
and East European studies minor, the urban affairs minor, and 
the women's studies minor, as well as the Graduate Certificate 
in Planning. See the "Interdisciplinary and Preprofessional 
Programs" section of this catalog. 

The department works actively with state and regional 
agencies on socioeconomic and environmental problems. Past 
faculty research projects include coastal storm impacts, regional 
economic developments, transportation planning, the impact of 
PCBs in New Bedford Harbor and the search for water supplies 
for the next century. 

The department has been involved with assisting local 
organizations through faculty research and student internships. 
Examples of such involvement are with local banks, planning 
agencies, retailers, Boston's "Big Dig," the Massachusetts Bay 
Transit Authority (MBTA), the Massachusetts Forest Fire Bureau, 
the Natural Resources Trust of Bridgewater and the Ocean Spray 
Cranberry Cooperative. 

Additionally, this department has been selected as the only 
department in the state college system in Massachusetts to 
participate in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration 
(NASA) sponsored Joint Venture (JOVE) program. Members of the 
faculty collaborate with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (on multi- 
spectral and hyperspectral remote sensing in Mexico, Alabama, 
and Southeastern Massachusetts), the Goddard Space Flight 
Center (on bolide impact), the U.S. Department of Transportation 
(on a national study of bus systems), Woods Hole Oceanographic 



Institution (on research problems in marine geochemistry and 
geology), the Massachusetts Department of Education (on state- 
wide curriculum reform) and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 
(on wetlands). Faculty are also involved in watershed studies in 
cooperation with biology department faculty at the Raytheon 
Watershed Access Laboratory. In addition, a member of the 
faculty has an appointment as guest investigator at the Woods 
Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod and has research 
opportunities for students in marine geochemistry and geology. 
Two other professors are actively engaged in statewide curricu- 
lum reform. The geography faculty maintains the Southeastern 
Massachusetts Global Education Center's Resource Center. 

A program leading to the degree of Master of Arts in Teaching 
(MAT) with a concentration in earth sciences is offered by the 
department. A MAT in Social Sciences with an emphasis on geog- 
raphy is available in cooperation with the history department. 

Modern equipment enables the department to offer investiga- 
tion oriented laboratory experience. This equipment includes: an 
X-ray Diffractometer with powder cameras; thin section equip- 
ment; polarizing and stereoscopic microscopes; atomic absorp- 
tion spectro-photometer; a proton procession magnetometer; 
earth resistivity unit; Frantz Isodynamic Separator; 14-foot coast- 
al research vessel; a portable gamma-ray spectrometer; Sunsparc 
20 UNIX work station; Hewlett Packard capillary gas chromato- 
graph; GPS surveying equipment; a portable visible-near infrared, t 
spectroradiometer; and groundwater sampling equipment. 

In addition, the department has a well-equipped remote 
sensing laboratory, and a cartographic laboratory with a large 
format digitizer planimeter; a climatological station with solar 
radiation recording instrumentation; a solar greenhouse class- 
room at the Burnell Campus School; an astronomy observa- 
tory; a wet geochemistry laboratory; and a wet, as well as dry, 
sedimentology laboratory. Finally, this department has access 
to a scanning electron microscope through the Southeastern 
Massachusetts Consortium. 

Earth sciences and geography faculty are using Bridgewater 
State College's sophisticated computer facilities for classroom 
instruction, including demonstrating and displaying Web-based 
and self-authored material and models. In a growing number of 
courses, students may submit assignments online, and in some 
courses, a majority of class time is spent in "virtual classrooms." 
To learn more, visit the department Web site at www.bridgew. 
edu/depts/geography. 

The department boasts an active Earth Sciences and 
Geography Club that sponsors both local (Harvard Mineral 
Museum), regional (New Hampshire's White Mountains), 
national (Hawaii), and international (Iceland, Mexico) field trips. 
Students may also qualify for Gamma Theta Upsilon the interna- 
tional geography honor society. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



105 



Geography 



bSc 



It K I I >< > 1 MAI i H 

STATE COUBOi 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM ^™ ge ° g,aphy 

GE06 323 Water Resources 

GEOG 324 Earth Surface Processes 

GEOGRAPHY MAJOR (BA OR BS) GE0G 331 Geography of Environmental Problems 

GEOG 332 Management and Preservation of the Natural 

A major or minor in geography can provide a student with a way Environment 

to examine the world with objectivity. Students can be trained to r[nr „, r . ( r ■ „*m ♦• 

. . . • • i 7 " . . . . . GEOG 333 Geography of Environmental Justice 

analyze the water-use and land-use opportunities in their com- rcnr -> Anr Z- ZjI n .t„ i-l. _jm »u j 

!. . . . .7 . . j j . . . GEOG 340 Geography Materials and Methods 

munities, to understand the interrelated systems that keep the rmr 5cn c~™!L. 

; GEOG 350 Economic Geography 

land and sea resources in balance, and to appreciate the varied rcnr , , rk _ n~~~ZZL 

... - „ . u r 7T GEOG 353 Urban Geography 

ways m which people all over the world use those resources. GEOG 354 Field Methods in Urban Geography 

Bridgwater State College graduates have found employment as GEQG 355 , , h 

planners, environmental analysts, teachers market researchers, GEOG 363 Locat.onal Analysis 

cartographers and administrators. Many of our geography GEOG 365 Geography of Transportation 

majors have gone on to earn advanced degrees from leading GEOG 374 Geography of the Middle East 

graduate schools. GEOG 375 Geography of South Asia 

Students are invited to meet with any of the geography faculty GEOG 376 Geography of East Asia 

- Professors Clark, Domingo, Hayes-Bohanan, Hellstrbm, Rao, or GEOG 380 Geography of Russia/C.I.S. 

Aten-to discuss the program. GEOG 381 Geography of Latin America 

All geography majors must complete the following courses: GEOG 382 Geography of Europe 

GEOG 383 Geography of the United States 

Credits GEOG 386 Geography of Canada 

GEOG 121 Physical Geography 3 GEOG 388 Geography of Africa 

GEOG 151 Human Geography 3 GEOG 400 Special Topics in Geography 

GEOG 213 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) 1 3 GEOG 413 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) II 

GEOG 290 Introduction to Geographic Analysis 3 GEOG 422 Online Weather Studies 

GEOG 370-389 Any regional geography course 3 GEOG 431 Environmental Regulations 

GEOG 490 Seminar in Geography 3 GEOG 441 Geographic Frameworks 

MATH 110 Elementary Statistics I 3 GEOG 462 Principles of Urban Planning 

Geography majors are required to complete the following addi- GEOG 463 Applications in Urban Planning 

tional courses according to the degree being sought: GEOG 497 Undergraduate Research in Geography 

GEOG 498 Internship in Geography or Planning 

m Geography GEOG 499 Directed Study in Geography 

GEOG 315 Quantitative Geography 3 Total minimum credits - BA in Geography: 39 

GEOG 413 Geographic Information Systems (GIS) II 3 Total minimum credits - BS in Geography: 39 

Students seekinq a BS in Geoqraphy are stronqly encouraqed to _ ^ 

complete e ^ urr,cu ' um Requirements 

GEOG 498 Internship in Geography or Planning A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 

These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 

BA in Geography as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 

GEOG 340 Geography Materials and Methods 3 section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 

GEOG 441 Geographic Frameworks 3 www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 

requirements, see the "Underqraduate Academic Policies" 

Program Elective: section of this catalog. 
All geography majors must complete any four additional cours- 

es chosen in consultation with their advisers, from the DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
%S?m£ZZZ EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD 

GEOG 222 aZS EDUCATION OR SPECIAL EDUCATION 

GEOG 314 Satellite Image Processing Applications to Students may choose a double major in geography and elemen- 

the Environment tary education, early childhood education or special education 

GEOG 3 1 5 Quantitative Geography for licensure purposes. Please contact the Department of 

GEOG 3 1 7 Air Photo Interpretation-Remote Sensing Geography and the appropriate education department for 

GEOG 321 Meteorology II further information. 



106 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Geography 




GEOGRAPHY MINOR Credits 

GEOG 121 Physical Geography 3 

GEOG 151 Human Geography 3 

Four additional geography courses (departmental approval 
required). Two courses must be at the 200 level or higher 
and 

must be from at least two of the following areas 12 

• a regional course 

• a topical course 

• a techniques course 

Total minimum credits: 18 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 
EARTH SCIENCES 

This program is inactive. 



GENERAL SCIENCE 

This program is inactive. 



PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

The MAT in Physical Science degree was developed for high 
school and middle school subject area teachers who have an 
initial license in chemistry, earth science or physics and are 
seeking a professional license in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. This MAT program is defined to meet the 
"appropriate master's degree" requirement, which is part of the 
criteria for professional stage licensure, as set forth in the most 
recent Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary 
Education licensure regulations. 

Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 
section of this catalog for information regarding program policy 
and procedures. 

For current information concerning program requirements, 
consult the "Physics" section of this catalog. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



107 



BSC 



BRMXjfcWATfcR 
STATE COLLBGfc 



History 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Professor Leonid Heretz 

Graduate Program Coordinator: Associate Professor 
Keith Lewinstein 

Professors: David Culver, Lucille Fortunato, Andrew Holman, 
Philip Silvia Jr., Jean Stonehouse, Wing-Kai To, 
Thomas Turner 

Associate Professors: Michael lerardi, Margaret Lowe, 
Erin O'Connor 

Assistant Professors: Joshua Greenberg, Raman Seylon, 
Sarah Wiggins 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1388 
Location: Tillinghast Hall, Room 310 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/history 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BA in History 
Concentration: Military History 

• MAT - History 

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• History 

• Public History* 

• Interdisciplinary Minor 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The department offers students a solid, liberal arts major as prep- 
aration for professional careers, for graduate study in other fields 
(law and librarianship, for example) and for careers as museum 
professionals and public historians. It prepares students to teach 
history at the middle and high school level, and it provides a 
relevant and valuable liberal arts major to students preparing for 
careers in elementary, early childhood and special education. It 
also contributes to the core curriculum program by offering 
history courses to all students. 

The Department of History recommends that its majors select 
a minor or interdisciplinary program that will complement the 
major program. History majors electing secondary education are 
strongly urged to take elective courses in geography, political 
science, economics and the behavioral sciences in order to meet 
present employment expectations. 

HISTORY MAJOR 
Grade Requirement 

No grade lower than a "C-" in a history (HIST) course may be 
used to fulfill the requirements for the history major. Students 
receiving a "D" or "F" in a history course may continue as his- 
tory majors but must either retake and successfully complete 



the course (with a grade of "C-" or better) or must successfully 
complete another course that fulfills the same required "area" 
for the major. 

Required Courses Credits 

One course from among 3 

HIST 1 1 1 Western Civilization to the Reformation 
HIST 121 The Ancient World 
HIST 131 World History to 1500 

One course from among 3 

HIST 112 Western Civilization since the Reformation 
HIST 132 World History since 1500 

HIST 221 United States History and Constitutions to 1865 3 

HIST 222 United States History and Constitutions 

since 1865 3 

One course taken from each of the following areas 18 

Area III Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern Europe 

Area IV Modern Europe 

Area V United States History to 1 877 

Area VI United States History since 1 877 

Area VII The Traditional World 

Area VIII Modern World 

Two upper division (300-400 level) electives, which 
must be taken in different geographical areas 
(World, Europe, U.S.A.). Students may meet this 
requirement with courses in public history and/or 

museum management 6 

Note: Students seeking elementary education, middle school 
or high school licensure with a history major should select 
an additional course in Area III as one of their electives so 
that they have taken one course from the Ancient/Medieval 
offerings and one from Early Modern Europe for a total of six 
credit hours in Area III toward completion of the major. 

HIST 495 Undergraduate History Colloquium 

(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum Requirement- 

CWRM) 

or 

HIST 496 Undergraduate History Seminar 
Students may use these courses to meet area requirements. 

Only six credits of 100-level and six credits of 200-level courses 
may be applied toward a history major or minor. 

No more than three credits from the following courses may be 
used toward the 36 credits required for a history major. 

HIST 489 Internship in History 

HIST 499 Directed Study in History 

No more than three credits from the following courses may be 
used toward the 36 credits required for a history major. 

HIST 458 North American Women's and Gender History 

HIST 466 Women in American History 

Total minimum credits: 36 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 



108 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



bSc 



BRIPGEWATER 
STATE COLI-EGE 



History 



www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES BY AREA 

Area I - Western Civilization and World History 

HIST 1 1 1 Western Civilization to the Reformation 

HIST 112 Western Civilization since the Reformation 

HIST 121 The Ancient World 

HIST 131 World History to 1500 

HIST 132 World History since 1500 

INTD 211 History and Literature of Western Civilization I 

Area II - United States History Surveys 

HIST 221 United States History and Constitutions to 1865 
HIST 222 United States History and Constitutions since 1865 

Area III - Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern Europe 

HIST 400 The Ancient World: Near East 

HIST 403 Ancient Greece and the Hellenistic Age 

HIST 404 The Ancient World: Rome 

HIST 406 Rise of Early Christianity 

HIST 408 Jews and Christians in the Ancient Roman World 

HIST 415 Europe in the Middle Ages 

HIST 418 Renaissance Europe 

HIST 419 The Reformation and Wars of Religion 

HIST 420 Early Modern Europe: Society and Culture 

HIST 421 European Women's History: Medieval Renaissance and 

Reformation 
HIST 425 British History since 1603 
HIST 437 European National Histories (when appropriate) 
HIST 437 European National Histories: Italy 

European National Histories: France 
HIST 439 Topics in Non-United States History 

(when appropriate) 
HIST 495 Undergraduate History Colloquium (when appropriate) 

Area IV - Modern Europe 

HIST 426 British Empire and Commonwealth since 1815 

HIST 429 The French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era 

HIST 430 Nineteenth Century Europe 

HIST 431 Twentieth Century Europe 

HIST 432 Intellectual History of Modern Europe 

HIST 433 Modern European Imperialism 

HIST 434 Modern Russia to 1917 

HIST 435 History of the U.S.S.R. 

HIST 436 History of East-Central Europe since 1918 

HIST 437 European National Histories 

HIST 439 Topics in Non-United States History 

(when appropriate) 
HIST 495 Undergraduate History Colloquium 

(when appropriate) 
INTD 427 Ireland in Literature and History, 1798-1922 

Area V - United States History to 1877 

HIST 440 Topics in United States History (when appropriate) 
HIST 441 United States History: The Colonial Period 1607-1763 



HIST 442 United States History: The American Revolution 
1763-1787 

HIST 443 United States History: The Early National Period 
HIST 444 Jacksonian Democracy and the Coming of the 
Civil War 

HIST 445 United States History: The Civil War 
HIST 448 United States Foreign Relations to 1900 
HIST 461 American Immigration and Ethnicity 
HIST 464 New England Textile Communities: Social and 

Economic History 
HIST 465 African-American History 
HIST 466 Women in American History 
HIST 489 History of Canadian-American Relations 
HIST 495 Undergraduate History Colloquiom 

(when appropriate) 

Area VI - United States History since 1877 

HIST 440 Topics in United States History (when appropriate) 

HIST 453 United States History: Progressive Era 

HIST 456 World War II 

HIST 457 America since World War II 

HIST 461 American Immigration and Ethnicity 

HIST 462 American Labor History 

HIST 464 New England Textile Communities: Social and 

Economic History 
HIST 465 African-American History 
HIST 466 Women in American History 
HIST 471 Sport in American Life 
HIST 495 Undergraduate History Colloquium 

(when appropriate) 

Area VII - The Traditional World 

HIST 400 
HIST 434 
HIST 439 

(when 
HIST 474 
HIST 477 
HIST 480 
HIST 482 
HIST 483 
HIST 487 
HIST 491 
HIST 495 

(when 



The Ancient World: Near East 

Modern Russia to 1917 

Topics in Non-United States History 

appropriate) 

Islamic Civilization to 1400 

Latin America: The Colonial Period 

History of Imperial China 

History of Modern Japan 

South Asia: The Modern Period 

Canadian History to Confederation 

Medicine and Society in the North Atlantic World 

Undergraduate History Colloquium 

appropriate) 



Area VIII -Modern World 

HIST 435 History of the U.S.S.R. 

HIST 439 Topics in Non-United States History 

(when appropriate) 
HIST 456 World War II 
HIST 475 The Modern Middle East 
HIST 478 Latin America: The National Period 
HIST 481 China Under Communism 
HIST 482 History of Modern Japan 
HIST 483 South Asia: The Modern Period 
HIST 484 War and Revolution in Modern Asia 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/dddenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 




History 



HIST 488 Canadian History since Confederation 
HIST 489 History of Canadian-American Relations 
HIST 491 Medicine and Society in the North Atlantic World 
HIST 494 Quebec and Canada since 1867 
HIST 495 Undergraduate History Colloquium 
(when appropriate) 

The following courses may be used to meet area 
requirements. The specific area, however, depends on 
the topic or topics addressed in the course. 

HIST 338 Honors Tutorial - Fall semester 

HIST 339 Honors Tutorial - Spring semester 

HIST 391 Historiography 

HIST 439 Topics in Non-United States History 

HIST 440 Topics in United States History 

HIST 485 Honors Thesis 

HIST 490 Historical Studies at Oxford 

HIST 495 Undergraduate History Colloquium 

HIST 496 Undergraduate History Seminar 

HIST 498 Internship in History 

HIST 499 Directed Study in History 

The following courses also carry credit in history 

INTD 200 Introduction to Canadian Studies 

INTD 211 History and Literature of Western Civilization I 

INTD 220 Introduction to American Studies 

INTD 420 American Studies Seminar 

INTD 427 Ireland in Literature and History, 1798-1922 

HISTORY MAJOR/MIDDLE SCHOOL OR HIGH 
SCHOOL EDUCATION MINOR 

History (Teacher of History Grades 5-8) 
Grade Requirement 

No grade lower than a "C-" in a history course may be used to 
fulfill the requirements for the history major. Students receiving a 
"D" or "F" in a history course may continue as history majors but 
must either retake and successfully complete the course (with a 
grade of "C-" or better) or must successfully complete another 
course that fulfills the same required "area" for the major. 

Required Courses Credits 

Please consult the "Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs" section of this catalog for 
courses required for the secondary education (high 

school, middle school, PreK-12 specialist) minor 33 

Note: The methods course requirement of all candidates seek- 
ing licensure as a teacher of history, grades 5-8 is MSED 450 
Strategies of Teaching History/Political Science in the 
Middle School 

One course from among the following 3 

HIST 111 Western Civilization to the Reformation 

HIST 121 The Ancient World 

HIST 131 World History to 1500 
One course from among the following 3 

HIST 112 Western Civilization since the Reformation 

HIST 132 World History since 1500 



HIST 221 United States History and Constitutions 

to 1865 ...3 

HIST 222 United States History and Constitutions 

since 1865 3 

One course taken from each of the following areas 18 

Area III Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern Europe 

Area IV Modern Europe 

Area V United States History to 1877 

Area VI United States History since 1877 

Area VII The Traditional World 

Area VIII Modern World 

Note: Students seeking middle school or high school licensure 
with a history major should select an additional course in Area 
III as one of their electives so that they have taken one course 
each from the Ancient/Medieval offerings and one from Early 
Modern Europe for a total of six credit hours in Area III toward 
completion of the major. 
Two additional upper division (300 and 400 level) 
history electives, which must be taken in different 
geographical areas (World, Europe, U.S.A.) 6 

HIST 495 Undergraduate History Colloquium 
(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 
Requirement-CWRM) 
or 

HIST 496 Undergraduate History Seminar 
Students may use these courses to meet area requirements. 
Only six credits of 100-level and six credits of 200-level 
courses may be applied toward a history major or minor. 

No more than three credits from the following courses may be 
used toward the 36 credits required for a history major. 
HIST 489 Internship in History 
HIST 499 Directed Study in History 

No more than three credits from the following courses may be 
used toward the 36 credits required for a history major. 
HIST 458 North American Women's and Gender History 
HIST 466 Women in American History 

Total minimum credits: 69 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

History (Teacher of History Grades 8-12) 
Grade Requirement 

No grade lower than a "C-" in a history course may be used to 
fulfill the requirements for the history major. Students receiving 
a "D" or "F" in a history course may continue as history majors 
but must either retake and successfully complete the course (with 
a grade of "C-" or better) or must successfully complete another 
course that fulfills the same required "area" for the major. 



110 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



History 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Required courses Credits 

Please consult the "Secondary Education and Professional 
Programs" section of this catalog for courses required 
for the secondary education (high school, middle school, 

PreK-12 specialist) minor 33 

Note: The methods course requirement of all candidates 
seeking licensure as a teacher of history, grades 8-12 is: 
HSED 41 2 Strategies for Teaching History/Political Science 



in the High School 

One course from among the following 3 

HIST 111 Western Civilization to the Reformation 
HIST 121 The Ancient World 
HIST 131 World History to 1500 

One course from among the following 3 



HIST 112 Western Civilization since the Reformation 
HIST 132 World History since 1500 

HIST 221 United States History and Constitutions to 1865 3 

HIST 222 United States History and Constitutions 

since 1865 3 

One course taken from each of the following areas 18 

Area III Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern Europe 

Area IV Modern Europe 

Area V United States History to 1877 

Area VI United States History since 1877 

Area VII The Traditional World 

Area VIII Modern World 

Note: Students seeking middle school or high school licensure 
with a history major should select an additional course in Area 
ill as one of their electives, so that they have taken one course 
from the Ancient/Medieval offerings and one from Early 
Modern Europe for a total of six credit hours in Area III toward 
completion of the major. 

Two additional upper division (300 and 400 level) 
history electives, which must be taken in different 
geographical areas (World, Europe, U.S. A) 6 

HIST 495 Undergraduate History Colloquium 
(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 
Requirement-CWRM) 
or 

HIST 496 Undergraduate History Seminar 

Students may use these courses to meet area requirements. 

Only six credits of 1 00-level and six credits of 200-level 
courses may be applied toward a history major or minor. 

No more than three credits from the following may be used 
toward the 36 credits for a history major: HI-ST 498, 499. 

HIST 489 Internship in History 

HIST 499 Directed Study in History 

No more than three credits from the following courses may be 
used toward the 36 credits required for a history major: 

HIST 458 North American Women's and Gender History 

HIST 466 Women in American History 

Total minimum credits: 69 



Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



MILITARY HISTORY CONCENTRATION 

All history majors with a military concentration must meet all the 
requirements of the history major. Specific course content areas 
are noted below. 

Grade Requirement 

No grade lower than a "C-" in a history course may be used to 
fulfill the requirements for the history major. Students receiving a 
"D" or "F" in a history course may continue as history majors but 
must either retake and successfully complete the course (with a 
grade of "C-" or better) or must successfully complete another 
course that fulfills the same required "area" for the major. 



Required Courses Credits 

One course from among 3 

HIST 111 Western Civilization to the Reformation 
HIST 121 The Ancient World 
HIST 131 World History to 1500 

One course from among 3 



HIST 1 12 Western Civilization since the Reformation 
HIST 132 World Historysince 1500 

HIST 221 United States History and Constitutions to 1865 3 

HIST 222 United States History and Constitutions since 1865 ... 3 
One course taken from each of the following areas: 
(one course of each grouping must be in 

military history) 18 

Area III and IV Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern Europe; 

Modern Europe 
Area V and VI United States History to 1877; United States 

Historysince 1877 
Area VII and VIII The Traditional World; Modern World 
Note: Students seeking middle school or high* school licensure 
with a history major should select an additional course in Area 
III as one of their electives so that they have taken one course 
from the Ancient/Medieval offerings and one from Early 
Modern Europe for a total of six credit hours in Area III toward 
completion of the major. 
Two upper division (300 and 400 level) 
military history electives, which must be 
taken in different geographical areas 

(World, Europe, U.S.A.) 6 

HIST 495 Undergraduate History Colloquium 
(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 
Requirement-CWRM) 
or 

HIST 496 Undergraduate History Seminar 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



History 



Students may use these courses to meet area requirements. 

Only six credits of 1 00 level and six credits of 200-level courses 
may be applied toward a history major or minor. 

No more than three credits from the following may be use 
toward the 36 credits required for a history major. 

HIST 489 Internship in History 

HIST 499 Directed Study in History 

No more than three hours from the following courses may be 
used toward the 36 credits required for a history major. 

HIST 458 North American Women's and Gender History 

HIST 466 Women in American History 

Total minimum credits: 36 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION OR SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major in history and elementary 
education, early childhood education or special education for 
licensure purposes. Appropriate advising materials with 
suggested sequences are available. 



MINOR IN SECONDARY (HIGH SCHOOL, 
MIDDLE SCHOOL, PreK-12 SPECIALIST) 

Students may minor either in secondary (high school, grades 
8- 1 2 or middle school, grades 5-8) education. Successful comple- 
tion of either of these programs will lead to Massachusetts Initial 
Teacher Licensure. Please refer to "Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs" for specific teacher licensure and 
program requirements. 



HISTORY MINOR 

Required Courses Credits 

HIST 1 1 1 Western Civilization to the Reformation 3 

or 

HIST 121 The Ancient World 
or 

HIST 131 World History to 1500 

HIST 112 Western Civilization since the Reformation 3 

or 

HIST 132 World History since 1500 

HIST 221 United States History and Constitutions to 1865 3 

HIST 222 United States History and Constitutions since 1865 ... 3 
One course (three credits) from the 300-400 upper level 
courses. Students may select from the following areas 3 



Area III Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern Europe 

Area IV Modern Europe 

Area VII Traditional World 

Area VIII Modern World 
One course (three credits) from the 300-400 upper 
level courses. Students may select from any one of 
the following areas 3 

Area V United States History to 1877 

Area VI United States History since 1 877 
Only six credits of 100-level and six credits of 200-level courses 
may be applied toward a history major or minor. 

Total minimum credits: 18 



INTERDISCIPLINARY MINOR IN PUBLIC 
HISTORY 

The departments of history and sociology and anthropology offer 
an interdisciplinary minor in public history that provides students 
with education and training for professional positions in public 
institutions such as museums, government offices, historical 
societies, national parks and business. The program is designed 
to serve the Southeastern Massachusetts region. 



Required Courses Credits 

HIST 392 History Seminar 3 

HIST 493 Museum Management: A Practicum 3 

HIST 498 Internship in History 3 

ANTH 103 Introduction to Archeology 

ANTH 303 Archeological Field Excavation in Prehistoric 

Sites in New England 3 

or 

ANTH 328 Archeology of North America 
ANTH 410 Public Archeology 3 

Suggested Electives 



HIST 440 Topics in United States History: Public History 

HIST 441 United States History: The Colonial Period 1607-1763 

HIST 461 American Immigration and Ethnicity 

HIST 464 New England Textile Communities: Social and 

Economic History 
POLI 277 American Government: State and Local 
SOCI 206 Cities and People: Urban Sociology 
SOCI 315 Race and Ethnicity in America 

Total minimum credits: 18 
For further information students should contact Dr. Leonid 
Heretz, chairperson, Department of History. 



HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in history provides highly motivated history 
majors with opportunities to enhance their academic program 
through intensive scholarly study and research designed to be of 
assistance in postgraduate employment or in the pursuit of an 
advanced degree in history. Contact the Department of History 
for further information concerning eligibility and application. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



History 



(GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 
HISTORY 

The Master of Arts in Teaching degree was developed for high 
school and middle school subject area teachers who have an 
initial license and are seeking a professional license in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The MAT program is designed 
to meet the "appropriate master's degree" requirement, which is 
part of the criteria for professional stage licensure, as set forth in 
the most recent MA DESE licensure regulations. This degree pro- 
gram will also appeal to secondary school teachers who already 
hold a standard level or professional license and want to acquire 
additional knowledge and a master's degree in the discipline. 

Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 
, section of the catalog for information regarding graduate pro- 
gram policies and procedures. 

Admission Requirements 

• A 2.75 undergraduate GPA based upon four years of work 
or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon work completed 
during the junior and senior years. 

| • A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• An initial teaching license 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

All accepted students must enroll under the direction of their 
adviser in GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning, which is 
described under "Graduate Advisers and Graduate Program 
Planning" in the "School of Graduate Studies" section of 
this catalog. 

Program Requirements Credits 
GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

Education Core Courses 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

EDMC 531 The Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 3 

EDMC 532 The Teacher as Leader: From Issues to Advocacy 3 

EDMC 533 The Standards-Based Classroom: 

Instruction and Assessment for Diverse Learners 3 

EDMC 538 The Professional Teacher (final program course) 3 

* Concentration Electives 18 

MAT students are expected to have, or acquire in addition to 
degree requirements, an appropriate background of college level 
courses in history, to be determined by the department. 

A minimum of 18 approved graduate credits in the academic 
area of concentration, which meet the academic and professional 
objectives of the student, is required. 

Each student must pass a comprehensive examination prior to 
being eligible to receive the Master of Arts in Teaching degree. 

Total minimum credits: 34 
For program details, candidates should consult the Department 
of History's graduate program coordinator, Dr. Keith Lewinstein. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



113 



Mathematics and Computer Science 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Professor Uma Shama 

Graduate Program Coordinators: 

Professor Glenn Pavlicek (Computer Science) 
Professor Uma Shama (Mathematics) 

Professors: Hang-Ling Chang, Zon-I Chang, Paul Fairbanks, 
Walter Gleason, Thomas Moore, Philip Scalisi 

Associate Professors: Mahmoud El-Hashash, Ward Heilman, 
Torben Lorenzen, Michael Makokian, John Nee, Richard 
Quindley, Abdul Sattar 

Assistant Professors: Heidi Burgiel, Shannon Lockard, 
Rebecca Metcalf, Lee Mondshein, John Santore 

Instructor: Ju Zhou 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1342 

Location: Hart Hall, Room 215 

Web site: www.bridgew.edu/depts/mathcs/ 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BS in Mathematics 

• BS in Computer Science 

• MAT - Mathematics 

• MS in Computer Science 

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• Actuarial Science* 

• Computer Science 

• Mathematics 

• Interdisciplinary Minor 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MATHEMATICS 

Since mathematics is both a cultural and a technical field of 
study, the curriculum is planned with the following objective: 

• to introduce students to mathematics as an important area 
of human thought; 

• to prepare students for careers in industry; 

• to give preparation to students for graduate study in math- 
ematics and related fields; 

• to prepare students planning to teach mathematics at the 
secondary level; 

• to serve the needs of students in fields which rely on math- 
ematics, e.g., experimental sciences, social sciences and 
elementary education. 

Note: The Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics is inactive. 



DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION OR EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major in mathematics and ele- 
mentary education, early childhood education or special educa- 
tion for licensure purposes. Appropriate advising materials with 
suggested course sequences are available. 



MINOR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION (HIGH 
SCHOOL, MIDDLE SCHOOL, OR PreK-12 
SPECIALIST) 

Students may minor in secondary education (high school, 
middle school or PreK-12 specialist). Successful completion of 
this minor will lead to Massachusetts Initial Teacher Licensure. 
Please refer to the "Department of Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs" for specific teacher licensure and 
program requirements. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER 
SCIENCE 

This program provides a broad background in computer science 
and will serve as preparation for employment in computer appli- 
cations or for graduate studies in the field. 

The department participates in a number of multidisciplinary 
programs for students preparing for careers in medicine, dentistry 
or oceanography. Additional information on these programs may 
be found in the section "Interdisciplinary and Preprofessional 
Programs." 

Note: The Bachelor of Arts in Computer Science is inactive. 



MATHEMATICS MAJOR 



Required Courses Credits 

MATH 151-152 Calculus I II 6 

MATH 180 Transition to Advanced Mathematics 3 

MATH 202 Linear Algebra 4 

MATH 251-252 Calculus lll-IV 6 

MATH 301 Abstract Algebra 1 3 

MATH 401 Introduction to Analysis I 3 

COMP 101 Computer Science I 3 

or 

COMP 203 Programming and Computer Algebra 
PHYS 243-244 General Physics Ml 8 



Four electives from any 300- or 400- level courses except 
MATH 318. As part of the the four electives, either MATH 
408 or MATH 416 must be taken to satisfy the upper-level 
writing intensive core curriculum requirement in the math- 
ematics major (CWRM). PHYS 403 Mathematical Physics 
may be taken as one of these four electives. 

Majors preparing for secondary school teaching careers must 
take MATH 403 Probability Theory, MATH 408 History of 
Mathematics and MATH 325 Foundations of Geometry as 
three of the four electives 12 



114 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Mathematics and Computer Science 



Grade Requirement 

Not more than one grade in the "D" range ("D+" ( "D," "D-") 
among the five courses MATH 151, MATH 1 52, MATH 202, 
MATH 251, and MATH 252 shall be accepted in partial fulfillment 
of the requirements for the major in Mathematics. A student 
receiving a second grade in the "D" range in one of the above 
courses must repeat the course with the higher number and 
receive a "C-" or better before being allowed to enroll in other 
mathematics courses. 

• Students who are contemplating majoring in mathematics or 
computer science should be aware of the sequential nature 
of the course offerings. In order for students to plan their 
programs so that degree requirements may be completed 
within a four-year period, students should consult with the 
chairperson of the department or their adviser as soon 

as possible. 

• Students seeking licensure as a teacher of Mathematics (5-8 
or 8-12) must also complete a minor in Secondary Education. 

Total minimum credits: 48 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

MATHEMATICS MINOR Credits 

A minimum of 18 hours is required. Students must 
satisfy the following three requirements: 

MATH 151-152 Calculus HI 6 

or 

MATH 141-142 Elements of Calculus HI 
One course from among the following 3 

MATH 120 Introduction to Linear Algebra 

MATH 202 Linear Algebra 

MATH 214 Introduction to Modern Algebra 
Three additional courses from among the following 9 

MATH 110 Elementary Statistics I 

MATH 120 Introduction to Linear Algebra 

MATH 130 Discrete Mathematics I 

MATH 200 Probability and Statistics 

MATH 202 Linear Algebra 

MATH 214 Introduction to Modern Algebra 

MATH 251 Calculus III 

MATH 252 Calculus IV 

any 300 or 400 level MATH courses including MATH 318 
Students who take one course from any of the following pairs 
of courses may not take the other course of that pair for credit 
towards the minor: 

MATH 110 and MATH 200 
MATH 120 and MATH 202 
MATH 214 and MATH 301 

Total minimum credits: 18 



ACTUARIAL SCIENCE MINOR 

This interdisciplinary minor, drawing from both high-level 
mathematics courses and finance courses is ideally suited for 
mathematics majors or accounting and finance majors who are 
interested in preparing for the actuarial science exam and in pur- 
suing an actuarial career or a career in a related area. 

Credits 

ACF1 100 Fundamentals of Financial Reporting 3 

ACFI 200 Financial Accounting 3 

ACFI 385 Managerial Finance 3 

MATH 151 Calculus 1 3 

MATH 152 Calculus II 3 

MATH 251 Calculus III 3 

Choose one course from the following 3 

ACFI 476 Insurance and Risk Management 

ACFI 490 Investments 

MATH 403 Probability Theory 
Note: Accounting and finance majors may not choose 
ACFI 476 or ACFI 490 to satisfy the minor requirements. 
Mathematics major may not choose MATH 403 to satisfy 
the minor requirements. 

Total minimum credits: 21 

COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJOR Credits 

Required Courses 

COMP 101 Computer Science 1 3 

COMP102 Computer Science II 3 

COMP 206 Introduction to Computer Organization 3 

COMP 330 Data Structures and Algorithms 3 

COMP 340 Organization of Programming Languages 3 

COMP 350 Operating Systems 3 

COMP 430 Computer Networks 3 

COMP 435 Analysis of Algorithms 3 

COMP 442 Object-oriented Software Engineering 3 

COMP 470 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence 3 

MATH 120 Introduction to Linear Algebra 3 

MATH 130 Discrete Mathematics 1 3 

MATH 151-152 Calculus I -II 6 

MATH 200 Probability and Statistics ' 3 

At least four elective courses (12 credits) must be 

selected from 12 

Any COMP courses at the 300-400 level 

(except COMP 410 Database Applications and 

those required above) 

MATH 415 Numerical Analysis 

PHYS 442 Digital Electronics I 
12 credit hours in the natural sciences including 

one of the following sequences 12 

BIOL 121-122 General Biology HI 

CHEM 131-132 Survey of Chemistry HI 

CHEM 141-142 Chemical Principles HI 

PHYS 181-182 Elements of Physics HI 

PHYS 243-244 General Physics HI 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addendal as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



115 



Mathematics and Computer Science 




Grade Requirement 

Not more than one grade in the "D" range ("D+", "D," "D-") 
among the four courses COMP 101, COMP 102, COMP 206 and 
COMP 330 shall be accepted in partial fulfillment of the require- 
ments for the major in computer science. A student receiving a 
second "D" in one of the above must repeat the course with the 
higher number and receive a "C-" or better before being allowed 
to enroll in other computer science courses. 

Any computer science major who has successfully completed 
COMP 1 02 will not be allowed to take COMP 1 00 or COMP 1 05 
for academic credit. 

Total minimum credits: 69 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE MINOR Credits 

COMP 101 Computer Science 1 3 

COMP 102 Computer Science II 3 

COMP 330 Data Structures and Algorithms 3 

and three additional courses to be selected from 9 

PHYS442 Digital Electronics I 
or 

any course counting toward the computer science major 

Total minimum credits: 18 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in mathematics and computer science 
provides highly motivated mathematics and computer science 
majors with opportunities to enhance their academic program 
through intensive scholarly study and research designed to be of 
assistance in postgraduate employment or in the pursuit of an 
advanced degree in mathematics or computer science. Contact 
the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science for fur- 
ther information concerning eligibility and application. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER 
SCIENCE 

The Master of Science in Computer Science is intended to meet 
the growing need for high-level computer professionals by 

• strengthening the preparation of individuals working in 
computer-related fields; 

• training professionals in other areas who wish to apply 
computer science to their respective fields or who desire to 
retrain for entry in a computer science career; 

• providing the necessary general and theoretical background 
for those individuals who wish to continue graduate study in 
computer science beyond the master's degree. 

The program consists of 30 credits and may be completed 
entirely on a part-time basis (courses are offered in the late 
afternoon or evening). 

Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 
years of work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon work 
completed during the junior and senior years 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

The Master of Science in Computer Science program seeks to 
attract individuals from various backgrounds who are highly 
motivated and prepared to meet the challenges of a rigorous 
advanced degree curriculum. In addition to a bachelor's degree, 
applicants should be familiar with the organization of computers 
and have competencies in: 

• a high-level programming language such as C, C++, or Java; 

• discrete and continuous mathematics; 

• data structures and algorithms. 

Demonstrated competencies within these areas can be achieved 
through professional experience, undergraduate study or transi- 
tional graduate course work. Students who do not already have 
a computer science degree should contact the program coordina- 
tor to determine their level of preparedness. 

Program Requirements Credits 

COMP 520 Operating Systems Principles 3 

COMP 540 Automata, Computability and Formal Languages... 3 

COMP 545 Analysis of Algorithms 3 

COMP 560 Artificial Intelligence 3 

COMP 590 Computer Architecture 3 

Candidates must successfully complete five courses 

from among the following 15 

COMP 510 Topics in Programming Languages 
COMP 525 Design and Construction of Compilers 
COMP 530 Software Engineering 



116 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Mathematics and Computer Science 



COMP 536 Graphics 

COMP 550 Topics in Discrete Mathematics 
COMP 562 Expert Systems 
COMP 565 Logic Programming 
COMP 570 Robotics 

COMP 575 Natural Language Processing 
COMP 580 Database Systems 
COMP 582 Distributed Database Systems 
COMP 594 Computer Networks 
COMP 596 Topics in Computer Science* 
COMP 599 Computer Science Seminar 

• Topics in Computer Science (COMP 596) has recently 
addressed issues such as human-computer interaction, 
bioinformatics, computer security, computer vision and 
computer learning systems. 

At the conclusion of the program, candidates will have the option 
of sitting for a comprehensive written exam which incorporates 
subject matter from the five required courses or completing a 
capstone project that allows candidates to pursue an area of 
interest in depth. 

Total minimum credits: 30 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 
MATHEMATICS 

The Master of Arts in Teaching degree was developed for high 
school and middle school subject area teachers who have an 
initial license and are seeking a professional license in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The MAT program is designed 
to meet the "appropriate master's degree" requirement, which is 
part of the criteria for professional stage licensure, as set forth in 
the most recent MA DESE licensure regulations. This degree pro- 
gram will also appeal to secondary school teachers who already 
hold a standard level or professional license and want to acquire 
additional knowledge and a master's degree in the discipline. 

Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 
section of the catalog for information regarding graduate pro- 
gram policies and procedures. 

Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 
years of work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon work 
completed during the junior and senior years 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• An initial teaching license 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

All accepted students must enroll under the direction of their 
adviser in GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning, which is 
described under "Graduate Advisers and Graduate Program 
Planning" in the "School of Graduate Studies" section of 
this catalog. 



Program Requirements Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

Education Core Courses 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

EDMC 531 The Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 3 

EDMC 532 The Teacher as Leader: From Issues to Advocacy 3 

EDMC 533 The Standards-Based Classroom: Instruction 

and Assessment for Diverse Learners 3 

EDMC 538 The Professional Teacher (final program course) 3 

Concentration Electives 18 

MAT students are expected to have, or acquire in addition to 
degree requirements, an appropriate background of college level 
courses, to be determined by the department. 

A minimum of 18 approved graduate credits in the academic 
area of concentration, which meet the academic and professional 
objectives of the student, is required. 

Successful completion of a comprehensive examination in 
the six required courses or a capstone project approved by the 
department is also required. 

Total minimum credits: 34 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



117 



BSC 



BKIDGfcWAI fcR 
STATE Cl)Ul(.l 



Music 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Associate Professor Salil Sachdev 

Graduate Program Coordinator: 

Associate Professor Steven Young 

Professors: Jean Kreiling, Carol Nicholeris 

Associate Professor: Deborah Nemko 

Assistant Professor: Donald Running 

Instructor: Sarah McQuame-Sherwin 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1377 
Location: Maxwell Library, Room 313A 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/depts/music 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BA in Music 
Concentration: Music Education 

• MAT -Music 



UNDERGRADUATE MINOR 

• Music 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The Department of Music offers a major within the framework of 
a Bachelor of Arts degree. The overarching goal of the program is 
to provide a solid foundation in music history, theory and perfor- 
mance within a liberal arts context, and by so doing prepares stu- 
dents who wish to pursue a variety of interests, including further 
study in music and Massachusetts Teacher Licensure. 

In addition, the Department of Music offers a minor for those 
students pursuing a BA or BS degree, as well as courses that 
satisfy the college-wide core curriculum requirements. Private 
instruction is given in piano, guitar, voice and orchestral and 
band instruments. A performance study fee is charged for these 
lessons. Performing organizations are also available for both 
singers and instrumentalists. 

A student wishing to major or minor in music should con- 
sult with the department chairperson as early as possible. 
Certain courses may be waived pending consultation with the 
Department of Music chairperson and/or completion of 
proficiency tests. 



MUSIC MAJOR 
Audition Requirement 

A formal audition is required for acceptance into the music 
major. There is no audition requirement for acceptance into the 
music minor. Auditions are held in February, May and November. 
Completed audition forms must be received by the music depart- 
ment two weeks prior to the audition date. To obtain forms, or 
additional information, contact Dr. Carol Nicholeris, audition 
coordinator, at 508.531.2040. 



Instrumentalists must proficiently execute the following 

• Major scales up to four sharps and flats and chromatic scale 

two octaves from memory 

• Sight-reading 

• A three-to-five-minute prepared solo, with or without 
accompaniment 

• A selection in a contrasting style 
Singers must proficiently execute the following 

• An unaccompanied major scale on a neutral syllable 

• Sight-reading 

• An art-song or aria 

• A selection in a contrasting style 

Accompanist must be provided by the student. 

Within 10 days of the audition, the candidate will be notified 
of his/her status. He/she will be: 

1) accepted into the major. 

2) conditionally accepted into the major. 

• The student may repeat an audition more than once on a 
scheduled audition or jury day 

• The student must pass the audition within one year in order 
to be accepted as a music major 

3) not accepted to the major. A student who auditions 
and is not accepted as a music major: 

• may audition only once more 

• may not take courses with a MUSC prefix other than to fulfill 
core curriculum requirements 

• may select music as a minor 

Students with questions concerning the suitability of audition 
material should contact Dr. Carol Nicholeris at 508.53 1 .2040 or 
e-mail: cnicholeris@bridgew.edu. 

A student majoring in music must earn 49 credits by combin- 
ing required courses and electives. In addition, a piano profi- 
ciency examination, which addresses basic competencies, must 
be passed. Specific musical examples and guidelines are avail- 
able from the Department of Music chairperson. Alternatively, 
the proficiency requirements may be met by successful person 
completion of MUSC 440. 

Grade Requirement 

The Department of Music will permit its majors to use only one 
passing grade below "C-" to satisfy requirements in the music 
major (including both the required core courses and electives). 
An additional grade below "C-" will require the student to take 
another music course, chosen in consultation with his or her 
adviser. The required core courses are designed to develop com- 
petence in theory, history, musicianship and performance. 

Credits 



MUSC 162 Music in African Culture 3 

or 

MUSC 1 63 Music of the Non-Western World 

MUSC 270 Sight-singing and Ear-training I 3 

MUSC 271 Music Theory I 3 

MUSC 272 Sight-singing and Ear-training II 3 

MUSC 273 Music Theory II 3 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Music 



MUSC 281 Music History 1 3 

MUSC 282 Music History II 3 

MUSC 351 Conducting 3 

MUSC 372 Form and Analysis 1: 1700-1900 3 

MUSC 472 Form and Analysis II: The Twentieth Century 3 

Ensembles 7 

MUSC 109 Beginning African Drumming Ensemble 

MUSC 111 Marching Band 

MUSC 112 Wind Ensemble 

MUSC 113 Jazz Band 

MUSC 115 Instrumental Ensemble 

MUSC 118 Chorale 

MUSC 119 Vocal Ensemble 

MUSC 151 Jazz and Show Choir 

MUSC 152 Opera Ensemble 

MUSC 183 String Ensemble 

Note: Students may apply only one ensemble credit per semester 
toward the major. No more than three credits may be taken in 
MUSC 1 1 1 and no more than two credits can be taken in MUSC 
109 or MUSC 115. 

Students are expected to meet music technology require- 
ments by either demonstrating proficiency in music technology or 
by taking MUSC 191 Introduction to Music Technology prior to 
taking MUSC 271 MusicTheory I. 

Performance Studies 

Six credits, including at least one semester at the 300 level 6 

MUSC 121,221,321,421 Brass 

MUSC 122, 222, 322, 422 Percussion 

MUSC 123, 223, 323, 423 Strings (Violin, Viola) 

MUSC 124, 224, 324, 424 Woodwinds 

MUSC 125 225, 325, 425 Guitar 

MUSC 126, 226, 326, 426 Strings (Cello, Bass) 

MUSC 131, 231, 331, 431 Voice (Singing) 

MUSC 141,241,341,441 Piano 

Music History Elective 

Choose from 3 

MUSC 363 Music of Bach, Handel and Vivaldi 

(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 

Requirement-CWRM) 
MUSC 364 Music of the Classical and Romantic 

Periods (Writing Intensive in the Major Core 

Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) 
MUSC 367 Music by Women Composers 

(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 

Requirement-CWRM) 
MUSC 369 Music of the Twentieth Century 

Elective 3 

Choose from the remaining history electives above 
or 

MUSC 371 Counterpoint 
MUSC 373 Composition I 
MUSC 374 Composition II 
MUSC 399 Special Topics in Music 
MUSC 456 Methods in Music Education 
MUSC 499 Directed Study in Music 



Piano Proficiency Requirement 

Completion of MUSC 440 Advanced Keyboard Skills with a grade 
of "C" or above. 

Recital Requirement 

All music majors must attend a specific, assigned number of on- 
campus recitals every semester they are registered as music majors. 
(Recitals in which the student is performing will not be counted 
toward this requirement.) Specifics concerning these recitals 
(which will generally include First Friday recitals, Faculty Artist 
Series recitals and student recitals), along with the minimum 
number required, will be posted in the Department of Music at 
the start of each semester. A student who fails to meet the mini- 
mum requirement for every semester he or she is enrolled as a 
music major will not be permitted to graduate as a music major. 

Total minimum credits: 49 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

MUSIC EDUCATION CONCENTRATION 

The music department offers a music education concentration, 
which allows prospective music educators to earn a bachelor 
of arts degree in music with a concentration in music educa- 
tion. This program is designed for students who wish to earn 
Massachusetts state licensure for teaching music (all levels) 
within their undergraduate experience. 

The following courses are required to complete the music 
education concentration: 



Course Requirements 

MUSC 166 Survey of American Jazz 

MUSC 270 Sight-Singing and Ear-Training I 

MUSC 271 Music Theory I 

MUSC 273 Music Theory II 

MUSC 281 Music History I 

MUSC 282 Music History II 

MUSC 372 Form and Analysis 1: 1700-1900 

Cognate Requirements 

PSYC 227 Development through the Life Cycle 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society... 
Note: Some of the required courses listed above also fulfill 
certain core curriculum requirements 

Ensemble and Performance Study Requirements 

Seven credits from ensembles* 

MUSC 112 Wind Ensemble 

MUSC 113 Jazz Band 

MUSC 115 Instrumental Ensemble 

MUSC 118 Chorale 

MUSC 119 Vocal Ensemble 

MUSC 183 String Ensemble 



Credits 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



119 



Music 



bSc 



BK MXit WATER 
STATfc C.<X.L£<.fc 



Six credits in performance studies. At least one semester at the 
300 level and at least one semester in a secondary perfor- 
mance medium (voice for an instrumentalist; instrument 

for vocalist) must be completed 6 

MUSC 121,221,321,421 Brass 

MUSC 122,222, 322, 422 Percussion 

MUSC 123, 223, 323, 423 Strings (Violin, Viola) 

MUSC 124, 224, 324, 424 Woodwinds 

MUSC 125, 225, 325, 425 Guitar 

MUSC 126, 226, 326, 426 Strings (Cello. Bass) 

MUSC 131, 231, 331, 431 Voice (Singing) 

MUSC 141,241,341,441 Piano 

Additional required courses 

MUSC 351 Conducting 3 

MUSC 375 Orchestration and Arranging 

(instrumental emphasis) 3 

or 

MUSC 455 Creative Activities in Elementary School Music 
(vocal emphasis) 

MUSC 388 Instrumental Techniques 3 

MUSC 456 Methods in Music Education 3 

MUSC 483 Choral Techniques 3 

MUSC ---- Music History elective 3 

Students seeking Initial Licensure must also declare a minor in 
secondary education and complete the following courses. (See 
the "Secondary Education and Preprofessional Programs" sec- 
tion of this catalog) 

EDHM 210 Introduction to Teaching 3 

EDHM 235 Learning and Motivation 3 

EDHM 335 Assessment and Planning 3 

EDHM 413 Strategies for Teaching Music 3 

EDHM 445 Content Area Reading, Writing and Study Skills 3 

EDHM 490 Student Teaching** 12 

* Students seeking Initial Licensure in music will be required to 
participate in a large ensemble (wind or chorale) for a mini- 
mum of seven semesters including at least four semesters in a 
large ensemble (wind ensemble or chorale). 

** As a minimum prerequisite to student teaching, students 
will be required to pass a Music Education Piano Proficiency 
Exam, which may necessitate private lessons. 

Total minimum credits: 85 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION OR SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major in music and elementary 
education, early childhood education or special education for 
licensure purposes. Appropriate advising materials with sug- 
gested course sequences are available. 

MINOR IN EDUCATION (ALL LEVELS) 

Students mmoring in education must refer to the "Department 
of Secondary Education and Professional Programs" for specific 
requirements, and consult with the Department of Music for 
additional information. 

MUSIC MINOR ~ 

Required Courses Credits 

MUSC 140 Class Piano 1 3 

MUSC 270 Sight-Singing and Ear-Training 1 3 

or 

MUSC 272 Sight-Singing and Ear-Training II 

MUSC 271 Music Theory I 3 

MUSC 281 Music History 1 3 

or 

MUSC 282 Music History II 

Three credits in ensembles 

(MUSC 112, 113, 115, 118, 119, 183) 3 

Six additional credits from among the following 6 

Performance Studies: (maximum four credits - at least one 

credit at the 300 level of study) 

MUSC 121,221,321,421 Brass 

MUSC 122, 222, 322, 422 Percussion 

MUSC 123,223,323,423 Strings (Violin, Viola) 

MUSC 124, 224, 324, 424 Woodwinds 

MUSC 125, 225, 325, 425 Guitar 

MUSC 1 26, 226, 326, 426 Strings (Cello, Bass) 

MUSC 1 3 1 , 23 1 , 33 1 , 43 1 Voice (Singing) 

MUSC 141,241,341,441 Piano 

MUSC 130 Voice Class I 
or 

MUSC 230 Voice Class II 
MUSC 162 Music in African Culture 
MUSC 166 Survey of American Jazz 
MUSC 240 Class Piano II 
MUSC 272 Sight-Singing and Ear-Training II 
MUSC 273 Music Theory II 
MUSC 281 Music History I 

or 

MUSC 282 Music History II 
MUSC 364 Music of the Classical and Romantic Periods 
MUSC 366 American Music of the Twentieth Century 
MUSC 367 Music by Women Composers 



120 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Music 



MUSC 371 Counterpoint 
MUSC 372 Form and Analysis 1: 1700-1900 
MUSC 399 Special Topics in Music 
MUSC 499 Directed Study in Music 

Total minimum credits: 21 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



POSTBACCALAUREATE PROGRAM: INITIAL 
LICENSURE - TEACHER OF MUSIC 

In conjunction with the School of Education and Allied Studies 
and the School of Graduate Studies, the Department of Music 
offers a postbaccalaureate program that qualifies a music gradu- 
ate to obtain Massachusetts initial licensure as a teacher of 
music at the PreK-1 2 grade level (vocal, instrumental, general). 

For additional current information concerning this program, 
contact the Department of Music. 



MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 
MUSIC 

Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 
years of work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon work 
completed during junior and senior years. 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• A bachelor's degree in music 

• An initial teaching license and teaching experience in the 
field of music 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• A passing score on the music Department of Music profi- 
ciency test and either a formal audition or a video of the 
applicant's teaching and/or conducting 

• Demonstrated proficiency in the use of technological applica- 
tions for music education as assessed by the department's 
technology specialist 

• MAT applicants are expected to have, or acquire in addi- 
tion to degree requirements, an appropriate background of 
college level courses, to be determined by the department. 
(Appropriate background for a music concentration would 
include theory, history, ear training/sight singing, conduct- 
ing, and piano proficiency.) 

• A candidate for this program will be expected to have taken 
at least one course in general music methods prior to enroll- 
ing in this program. A candidate missing such background 
may take either MUSC 456 Methods in Music Education or 
MUSC 455 Creative Activities in Elementary School Music in 
addition to regular program requirements. 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 



Program Requirements 

Education Core Courses Credits 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

EDMC 531 The Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 3 

EDMC 532 The Teacher as Leader: From Issues to Advocacy 3 

EDMC 533 The Standards-Based Classroom: Instruction 

and Assessment for Diverse Learners 3 

EDMC 538 The Professional Teacher (final program course) 3 

Music Courses 

MUSC 552 Seminar in Music Education Problems 3 

MUSC 558 Orff Schulwerk Teacher Training: Level I 3 

(MUSC 559 Orff Schulwerk Teacher Training: Level II 

or 

MUSC 562 Orff Schulwerk Teacher Training: Level III 



may be substituted for this course) 

MUSC 559 Orff Schulwerk Teacher Training: Level II 3 

or 

MUSC 503 Directed Study 

MUSC 564 Music in the Arts: A Cultural Perspective 3 

MUSC 569 Foundations in Music Education 3 

MUSC 575 Techniques for Arranging Classroom and 

Concert Music 3 



Successful completion of a comprehensive examination is 
also required. 

Total minimum credits: 33 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



121 



Philosophy 



IIH 1 1 )< . I * M I M 

STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Professor Aeon Skoble 

Professors: Robert Fitzgibbons, Edward James, 
Francine Quaglio 

Associate Professor: Catherine Womack 

Assistant Professors: William Devlin, Laura McAlmden 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1379 
Location: Tillinghast Hall, Room 340 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/philosophy 



DEGREE PROGRAM 

• BA in Philosophy 

Concentration: Applied Ethics 



UNDERGRADUATE MINOR 

• Philosophy 



The Department of Philosophy offers a major leading to the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. A minor in philosophy is also available. 
The program in philosophy provides a solid foundation for entry 
into careers such as law, journalism, college teaching, manage- 
ment, and medical ethics, as well as preparation for graduate 
work in philosophy and related disciplines. 

The study of philosophy involves the development of a broad 
range of analytical, interpretive, evaluative and critical abili- 
ties as they are applied to a variety of theoretical and practical 
human concerns. Courses in the problems, history and methods 
of philosophy as a mode of critical thinking deal with questions 
about the priority of values; the status of knowledge, truth and 
consciousness; the nature of art, religion, science and politics. 

The department offers numerous opportunities for students 
to excel, provides models of intellectual excellence, and fosters 
an atmosphere of mutual respect and open-mindedness. Faculty 
advisers work closely with students who wish to plan a course 
of study within the philosophy program. Academically talented 
students should contact the department chairperson for details 
about its honors program. Extracurricular activities include the 
Philosophy Club, which gives students from all majors a chance 
to discuss philosophical topics in an open and constructive man- 
ner. The club also sponsors the Bndgewater Journal of Philosophy, 
which publishes student research and essays. 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



PHILOSOPHY MAJOR 

A minimum of 10 philosophy courses (30 credits) is required. 
Grade Requirement 

A grade of "C" or higher is required in all philosophy course work 
contributing to the major. 



Credits 

One three-credit, 100-level philosophy course r.. 3 

At least one of the following courses in logic is required 3 

PHIL 201 Rational Thinking 

PHIL 310 Symbolic Logic 
At least two of the following courses in the history 

of philosophy are required 6 

PHIL 301 Plato and Aristotle 

PHIL 303 Major Modern Philosophers 

PHIL 305 American Philosophy 
At least two of the following area courses are required 6 

PHIL 402 Knowledge and Truth 

PHIL 403 Ethics and Action 

PHIL 404 Mind and Language 
PHIL 450 Senior Seminar in Philosophy (Writing Intensive in the 

major Core Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) is required 3 

At least three additional courses in philosophy 

are required 9 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

Total minimum credits: 30 



APPLIED ETHICS CONCENTRATION 

Fulfill requirements for the philosophy major with at least four 
courses from the following distribution. 

PHIL 203 Happiness and the Meaning of Life 

PHIL 204 Sex and Personal Relations 

PHIL 205 Medical Ethics 

PHIL 210 Liberation Ethics 

PHIL 222 Philosophy of Law 

PHIL 231 Amoralism, Egoism, and Altruism 

PHIL 234 Free Will, Determinism and Responsibility 

Total minimum credits: 30 



PHILOSOPHY MINOR 

For a minor in philosophy, a student must complete six philoso- 
phy courses (18 credits). Interested students should contact the 
chairperson in order to discuss an individual program relevant to 
their academic majors. 

Total minimum credits: 18 



DOUBLE MAJORS 

Philosophy is an excellent double major in that it enriches 
the questions and theoretical orientation of any other discipline. 
Interested students, particularly those majoring in education, 
should contact the chairperson in order to discuss an 
individual program. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Philosophy 




PROGRAM 

The Philosophy Departmental Honors Program encourages 
students to excel in philosophy, to provide models and guid- 
ance for pursuing excellence, and to honor those students who 
demonstrate excellence. To be accepted into the departmental 
honors program, a student must be a philosophy major and fulfill 
the following criteria at the time of application to the philosophy 
honors program 1 . 

• A 3.3 GPA for all philosophy courses to be used toward a 
Bridgewater State College degree with a minimum of three 
philosophy courses completed2. 

• A 3.3 GPA for all completed course work to be used for a 
Bridgewater State College degree. 

• At least 60 credits completed toward an undergraduate 
degree. 

For additional information concerning the departmental 
honors program in philosophy, please contact the department 
chairperson. 

The Department of Philosophy has a chapter of Phi Sigma Tau, 
the international honors society for philosophy. Membership is 
open, regardless of major, to sophomores and higher with a 3.0 
average in two or more philosophy classes and a 3.2 cumulative 
GPA. Members receive a certificate and are eligible to wear a 
sash indicating membership as part of their graduation regalia. 

1 Upon admission to the departmental honors program, 

a student's philosophy major advisor will assume responsibil- 
ity for advising the student in respect to the honors program. 

2 Students entering the Honors Program at or near the mini- 
mum GPA for admission should be aware that achieving 
higher grades in future philosophy courses will be neces- 
sary in order to eventually reach the 3.5 GPA in philosophy 
required for completing the Honors Program. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

The department does not currently offer a graduate program. 
However, philosophy courses at the 400 level, with the exception 
of PHIL 450, PHIL 485 and PHIL 499, may be taken for graduate 
credit with the consent of the Department of Philosophy. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



123 



Physics 



BRIDGE WAT LK 

ST a i f coura 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Associate Professor Martina Arndt 

Graduate Program Coordinator: Professor Jeffrey Williams 

Professor: Edward Deveney 

Associate Professor: Thomas Klmg 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1386 
Location: Conant Science Building, Room 115A 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/physics 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BA in Physics 
Concentration: General Physics 

• BS in Physics 

Concentration: Professional Physics 

• MAT - Physical Science 

• MAT -Physics 

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• Physics 

• Geophysics* 

• Interdisciplinary Minor 

The Department of Physics strives to provide students with the 
necessary skills and knowledge to pursue successful careers 
in research, teaching or further study in graduate programs. 
Programs in physics culminating in the degrees of Bachelor 
of Arts, Bachelor of Science and Master of Arts in Teaching 
are offered. 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 

BACHELOR OF ARTS/BACHELOR OF 
SCIENCE 

The Department of Physics offers programs leading to the bach- 
elor's degree in physics. A major in physics provides students with 
the necessary skills and knowledge to pursue successful careers 
in research, teaching, graduate and professional programs, 
industry, engineering and many other fields. Each student can 
plan a physics program with the help of a faculty adviser to meet 
specific future needs. The department also offers students oppor- 
tunities in on-campus research and internships. 

Students who are contemplating majoring in this department 
should be aware of the sequential nature of the course offerings. 
It is of prime importance that students consult with the chair- 
person of the department as soon as possible so that they can 
complete degree requirements in four years. 



PHYSICS MAJOR 

The Department of Physics offers two physics concentrations: 
a professional physics concentration and a general 
physics concentration. Both concentrations have a core 
set of seven physics courses along with cognate courses in 
mathematics and chemistry. 

PHYSICS CORE 

All physics majors take the physics core courses and core 
cognates. 

Credits 

PH YS 243-244 General Physics Ml 8 

PHYS401 Modern Physics 4 

PHYS 402 Quantum Mechanics 3 

PHYS 414 Experimental Physics 3 

PHYS 438 Electricity and Magnetism 3 

PHYS 439 Mechanics 3 

Core Cognates 

CHEM 141-142 Chemical Principles l-ll 8 

MATH 151-152 Calculus l-ll 6 

Total minimum credits: 38 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

PROFESSIONAL PHYSICS CONCENTRATION 

The physics major with a professional physics concentration is 
designed to meet the needs of students going to graduate school 
in physics or a related field, or jobs in science or engineering. 

Requirements Credits 

Physics core courses 24 

Physics core cognates 14 

Electives 

12 credit hours of physics electives above the 100 level 

from the list below 12 

PHYS 403 Mathematical Physics 

PHYS 405 Nuclear Physics 

PHYS 409 General Relativity and Cosmology 

PHYS 422 Computer Simulation in Physical Science 

PHYS 433 Thermal Physics 

PHYS 435 Optics 

PHYS 442 Digital Electronics I 

PHYS 458 Advanced Electricity and Magnetism 

PHYS 459 Advanced Mechanics 

PHYS 460 Advanced Quantum Mechanics 

PHYS 498 Internship in Physics 

PHYS 499 Directed Study in Physics 



124 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Physics 



Cognates 

MATH 251 Calculus III 3 

MATH 316 Differential Equations 3 

Total minimum credits: 56 

GENERAL PHYSICS CONCENTRATION 

The physics major with a general physics concentration is 
designed to meet the needs of students seeking jobs in teach- 
ing, engineering, industry, computers, finance, biology, medicine, 
law and many other fields. It also would be an effective major to 
combine with many of the minors offered at the college. Along 
with the physics core and physics core cognate courses, the stu- 
dent must take six hours of physics electives from the list below. 



Cognates Credits 

Physics core courses 24 

Physics core cognates 14 

Physics Electives 6 



PHYS 107 Exploring the Universe 

PHYS 180 Energy and its Social Uses 

PHYS 403 Mathematical Physics 

PHYS 405 Nuclear Physics 

PHYS 409 General Relativity and Cosmology 

PHYS 422 Computer Simulation in Physical Science 

PHYS 433 Thermal Physics 

PHYS 435 Optics 

PHYS 442 Digital Electronics I 

PHYS 458 Advanced Electricity and Magnetism 

PHYS 459 Advanced Mechanics 

PHYS 460 Advanced Quantum Mechanics 

PHYS 498 Internship in Physics 

PHYS 499 Directed Study in Physics 

Total minimum credits: 44 

PHYSICS MINOR 

18 credits in physics acceptable for the physics major. 

Total minimum credits: 18 

GEOPHYSICS MINOR 

A minor is jointly offered with the Departments of Earth Sciences 
and Geography. For further information contact the department 
chairpersons. 



DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION OR SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major in physics and elementary 
education, early childhood education or special education for 
licensure purposes. Please contact the Department of Physics and 
the appropriate education department for further information. 



MINOR IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 
(HIGH SCHOOL, MIDDLE SCHOOL OR 
PreK-12 SPECIALIST) 

Students may minor in secondary education (high school, middle 
school or PreK-1 2 specialist). Successful completion of this minor, 
the program requirements of either a BA or BS in physics and 
PHYS 107 Exploring the Universe will lead to Massachusetts 
Initial Teacher Licensure. Please refer to the "Department of 
Secondary Education and Professional Programs" for specific 
teacher licensure requirements. 



HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in physics provides highly motivated physics 
majors with opportunities to enhance their academic program 
through intensive scholarly study and research designed to be of 
assistance in postgraduate employment or in the pursuit of an 
advanced degree in physics. Contact the Department of Physics 
for further information concerning eligibility and application. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 
PHYSICS 

The Master of Arts in Teaching degree in physics in was devel- 
oped for high school and middle school subject area teachers 
who have an initial license and are seeking a professional license 
in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. This MAT program is 
designed to meet the "appropriate master's degree" require- 
ment, which is part of the criteria for professional stage licensure, 
as set forth in the most recent MA DESE licensure regulations. 

Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 
section of the catalog for information regarding graduate pro- 
gram policies and procedures. 

Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 
years of work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon work 
completed during the junior and senior years 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• An initial teaching license 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course 
work 

All accepted students must enroll under the direction of their 
adviser in GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning, which is 
described under "Graduate Advisers and Graduate Program 
Planning" in the "School of Graduate Studies" section of 
this catalog. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bndgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



125 



Physics 



bSc 

BHIIX.I 1MIK 
VI All ( < )l I I (.1 



Program Requirements Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

Education Core Courses 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

EDMC 531 The Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 3 

EDMC 532 The Teacher as Leader: From Issues to Advocacy 3 

EDMC 533 The Standards-Based Classroom: Instruction and 

Assessment for Diverse Learners 3 

EDMC 538 The Professional Teacher (final program course) 3 

Concentration Electives 

MAT students are expected to have, or acquire in addition to 
degree requirements, an appropriate background of college level 
courses, to be determined by the department. 

A minimum of 18 approved graduate credits in the academic 
area of concentration, which meet the academic and profes- 
sional objectives of the student, is required 18 

Successful completion of a comprehensive examination is 
also required. 

Total minimum credits: 34 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 
GENERAL SCIENCE 

This program is inactive. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 
PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

The Master of Arts in Teaching degree in physical science degree 
was developed for high school and middle school subject area 
teachers who have an initial license in chemistry, earth sci- 
ence or physics and are seeking a professional license in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. This MAT program is defined 
to meet the "appropriate master's degree" requirement, which 
is part of the criteria for professional stage licensure, as set forth 
in the most recent Massachusetts Department of Elementary and 
Secondary Education licensure regulations. 

Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 
section of this catalog for information regarding program policy 
and procedures. 

Admission requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 
years of work or a 3.0 undergraduate 

GPA based upon work completed during the junior and 
senior years 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• An initial teaching license 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 



Program requirements 

Education Core Courses Credits 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

EDMC 531 The Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 3 

EDMC 532 The Teacher as Leader: From Issues to Advocacy 3 

EDMC 533 The Standards-Based Classroom: Instruction and 

Assessment for Diverse Learners 3 

EDMC 538 The Professional Teacher (final program course) 3 

Introductory course 

PHSC 501 Problem Solving in Physical Science 3 

Concentration Electives 

Twelve (12) credits in electives at least three credits 

from each area 12 

Chemistry 

CHEM 512 Microcomputers as Laboratory Instruments 
CHEM 550 Chemistry and the Environment 

Earth Science 

EASC 501 Observational Astronomy 

EASC 504 Observational Meteorology 

EASC 550 Modern Developments in Earth Science 

EASC 560 Special Topics in Earth Science 

Physics 

PHYS 550 Physics forTeachers-A Modern Review 
PHYS 560 Special Topics in Physics Teaching 
PHYS 581 The Physics of the Environment " 
PHYS 593 Special Topics in Secondary School Science 
or 

PHYS 594 Special Topics in Junior High Science I 
Capstone course 

PHSC 590 Integrated Physical Science 

Total minimum credits: 33 



126 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Political Science 




FACULTY 

Chairperson: Professor George Serra 

Graduate Program Coordinator: 

Associate Professor Wendy Haynes 

Professors: Michael Kryzanek, Shaheen Mozaffar 

Associate Professor: Mark Kemper 

Assistant Professors: Jordon Barkalow, Brian Frederick, 
Deniz Leuenberger, Margaret Stout 

Instructor: Jodie Kluver 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1387 
Location: Summer Street House, Room 101 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/polisci 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BA in Political Science 

Concentrations: American Politics, International Affairs, 
Legal Studies, Public Administration 

• Master of Public Administration (MPA) 
Concentrations: Civic and Nonprofit Leadership and 
Administration, Sustainable Community Development 



UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• Civic Education and Community Leadership* 

• Political Science 

• Interdisciplinary minor 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



THE POLITICAL SCIENCE PROGRAM 

The Department of Political Science offers five programs of study 
in political science: a political science major (no concentration), a 
political science major (American politics concentration), a politi- 
cal science major (international affairs concentration), a political 
science major (legal studies concentration) and a political science 
major (public administration concentration). 

The political science major (no concentration) offers students 
an understanding of governmental structures and political pro- 
cesses in their own country and in other parts of the world. This 
program provides a foundation for graduate work in political sci- 
ence, public administration and international affairs, for the study 
of law, and for professional careers in teaching and in the public 
and private sectors. 

The political science major (international affairs concentra- 
tion) offers students an understanding of the structures and pro- 
cesses that govern political and economic relations among global 
actors. This program provides a foundation for graduate work 
in international politics, international business and economics, 
international law and organization, and for a professional career 
in these fields. 

The political science major (legal studies concentration) offers 
students a background for professional careers in the field of 



law. This program provides a foundation for law school and for 
paralegal studies. 

The political science major (American politics concentration) 
offers students a broad understanding of American politics. The 
concentration is designed to provide strong undergraduate scien- 
tific education in preparation for entry into advanced degree pro- 
grams and professional careers in public service, private institutions 
and political organizations in the United States. 

The political science major (public administration concentration) 
prepares students for a career focus in the public and nonprofit 
sectors at the federal, state, and local levels. The concentration is 
designed for those students who wish to pursue a Master of Public 
Administration degree and/or a career in this field. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 

The Department of Political Science offers the Bachelor of Arts 
degree in political science. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE CORE COURSES 

All political science majors, regardless of their concentration, 
must complete 21 credits by taking the following core courses. 

Credits 



POL1 172 Introduction to American Government 3 

POLI 250 Research Methods in Political Science 3 

POLI 260 International Relations 3 

POLI 274 Western Political Thought-Plato to the Present 3 

POLI 275 Comparative Government 3 

POLI 277 American Government: State and Local 3 

POLI 475 Senior Seminar in Political Science 
(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 
Requirement-CWRM) 3 



Note: Only three credits in each of the following may be applied 
to the major, regardless of concentration and minor: POLI 498 
Internship in Political Science; POLI 499 Directed Study in Political 
Science; practicum in political science (including POLI 301 Model 
Senate Practicum and POLI 302 Moot Court and Mock Trial 
Practicum) 

Total minimum credits in political science CORE: 21 
Grade Requirement 

No grade lower than a "C-" in a political science (POLI) course 
may be used to fulfill the requirements for the political science 
major or minor. Students receiving a "D" or "F" in a political 
science course may continue as political science majors or minor 
but must either retake and successfully complete the course (with 
a grade of "C-" or better) or must successfully complete another 
course that fulfills the same area for the major or minor. 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



127 



Political Science 



BSC 

BR1DCEWATEK 

STATE C(M-LtGE 



POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJOR 

No Concentration 

A student choosing the political science major (no concentration) 
must complete the political science major CORE courses (21 
credits) and 1 5 credits (five courses) at the POLI 300 or 400 level. 

Total minimum credits: 36 

POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJOR 

American Politics Concentration 

A student choosing the political science major (American politics 
concentration) must complete the CORE courses above and 
the concentration requirements below: 

Credits 

Political Science CORE courses 21 

A minimum of one course must be selected 

from the following 3 

POLI 341 Constitutional Law and Politics 

The Powers of Government 
POLI 372 Legislative Process and Procedure 
POLI 391 The American Presidency 
In addition, a minimum of one course must be selected 

from the following 3 

POLI 375 American Political Parties and Interest Groups 
POLI 379 Voters, Elections and Campaigns 
POLI 380 Public Opinion and Mass Political Behavior 
In addition, students choosing the American politics 
concentration must select electives (other than 
those taken in the categories above) from the course 
menu below to meet the 15 credit requirement of 

the concentration 9 

POLI 341 Constitutional Law and Politics: 

The Powers of Government 
POLI 342 Constitutional Law and Politics: 

The First Amendment 
POLI 343 Constitutional Law and Politics: 

Liberty and Equality 
POLI 344 Constitutional Law and Politics: 

Rights of the Accused 
POLI/COMM 364 Political Communication 
POLI 368 American Political Thought 
POLI 372 Legislative Process and Procedure 
POLI 375 American Political Parties and Interest Groups 
POLI 376 Urban Politics 
POLI 379 Voters, Elections and Campaigns 
POLI 380 Public Opinion and Mass Political Behavior 
POLI 389 Racial Politics in the United States 
POLI 391 The American Presidency 
POLI 476 Women and Politics 
POLI 479 Public Policy 
POLI 485 Honors Thesis in Political Science 
POLI 498 Internship in Political Science (three credits only) 

Total minimum credits: 36 



POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJOR 

International Affairs Concentration 

A student choosing the political science major (international 
affairs concentration) must complete the CORE courses above 
and the concentration requirements below: 

Credits 

Political Science CORE courses 21 

POLI 384 United States Foreign Policy 3 

POLI 473 International Organization 3 

Choose one course from the following 3 

POLI 370 Canadian Foreign Policy: Actors and Issues 

POLI 377 Canadian-American Political Relations 

POLI 386 Canadian Politics 
Choose one course from the following 3 

POLI 330 Asian Politics 

POLI 381 United States-Latin American Relations 
POLI 382 Latin American Government and Politics 
POLI 385 Government and Politics in the Middle East 
POLI 387 Government and Politics of Africa 
POLI 388 Government and Politics of Eastern Europe 

Choose one course from the following 3 

POLI 361 International Political Economy 

POLI 365 International Politics of the Environment 

POLI 455 Totalitarian Political Systems: 

Dictators and the Reign of Terror 
POLI 485 Honors Thesis in Political Science 
POLI 488 Politics and Development in the Third World 
POLI 498 Internship in Political Science (three credits only) 

Total minimum credits: 36 

POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJOR 

Legal Studies Concentration 

A student choosing the political science major (legal studies con- 
centration) must complete the CORE courses above and the 
concentration requirements below: 

Credits 

Political Science CORE courses 21 

All of the following: 

POLI 285 Law and the Judicial Process 3 

POLI 341 Constitutional Law and Politics: 

The Powers of Government 3 

POLI 372 Legislative Process and Procedure 3 

One course selected from the following 3 

POLI 342 Constitutional Law and Politics: 
The First Amendment 

POLI 343 Constitutional Law and Politics: 
Liberty and Equality 

POLI 344 Constitutional Law and Politics: 
Rights of the Accused 

POLI 495 Administrative Law and Regulation 
One course selected from the following 3 

PHIL 222 Philosophy of Law 

PHIL 235 Human Rights and Human Liberties 



128 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Political Scienc 



POLI/ECON 340 Law and Economics 

POLI 400 Special Topics in Political Science* 

POLI 485 Honors Thesis in Political Science* 

POLI 498 Internship in Political Science (three credits only)* 

* Credit earned will count toward the legal studies concentration 
only if a significant portion of the course content or internship 
is related to the law. A determination as to whether the course 
or internship meets this requirement will be made by the 
department chairperson. If the chairperson concludes that the 
course or internship is not sufficiently related to the law, then 
the course or internship will not satisfy this requirement of the 
legal studies concentration. 

Total minimum credits: 36 

POLITICAL SCIENCE MAJOR 

Public Administration Concentration 

A student choosing the political science major (public administra- 
tion concentration) must complete the CORE courses above 
and the concentration requirements below: 

Credits 

Political Science CORE courses 21 

POLI 279 Introduction to Public Administration 3 

POLI 390 Public Finance 3 

Three courses selected from the following 9 

POLI 201 Citizenship and Community Leadership 

POLI 376 Urban Politics 

POLI 400 Special Topics in Political Science* 

POLI 479 Public Policy 

POLI 485 Honors Thesis in Political Science 

POLI 495 Administrative Law and Regulation 

POLI 479 Public Policy 

POLI 498 Internship in Political Science (three credits only)* 

* Credit earned will count toward the public administration con- 
centration only if a significant portion of the course content or 
internship is related to public administration. A determination 
as to whether the course or internship meets this requirement 
will be made by the department chairperson. If the chairper- 
son concludes that the course or internship is not sufficiently 
related to public administration, the course or internship will 
not satisfy the requirement of the public administration con- 
centration. 

Total minimum credits: 36 

DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION OR SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major in political science and 
elementary education, early childhood education or special 
education for licensure purposes. Appropriate advising materials 
with suggested course sequences are available. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE MINOR 

A student may qualify as a political science minor by completing 
the following requirements: 

Credits 

POL1 172 Introduction to American Government 3 

POLI 260 International Relations 3 

POLI 274 Western Political Thought-Plato to the Present 3 

POLI 275 Comparative Government 3 

Three electives, at least one of which must be at the 

POLI 300 -400 level 9 

Only three credits of internship or directed study may be applied 
toward the minor. 

Grade Requirement 

No grade lower than a "C-" in a political science (POLI) course 
may be used to fulfill the requirements for the political science 
major or minor. Students receiving a "D" or "F" in a political 
science course may continue as political science majors or minor 
but must either retake and successfully complete the course (with 
a grade of "C-" or better) or must successfully complete another 
course that fulfills the same area for the major or minor. 

Total minimum credits: 21 

INTERNSHIP PROGRAM 

An internship program in political science is available to all stu- 
dents, majors and nonmajors, who meet the program criteria. A 
wide range of assignments are available with federal, state and 
local governments and nonprofit organizations. Assignment to 
the internship program is based on application to and subse- 
quent selection by the internship supervisor. Application proce- 
dures follow college policy (see section on "Internships" in the 
"Undergraduate Academic Experience" section of this catalog ). 
To be eligible for an internship, a political science major or minor 
must have already completed POL1 172 and a 300-level political 
science course and must receive the consent of the internship 
supervisor. Non-political science majors and minors must have 
the approval of their major adviser and the political science 
internship supervisor and must have taken one political science 
course. Interns must have achieved at least a junior standing. 
Credits shall be limited to three unless more are approved by the 
Department of Political Science. However, only three credits may 
apply to the major or the minor. It is recommended that those 
students with an interest in the program confer with the intern- 
ship supervisor as soon as possible in the semester before their 
proposed internship. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in political science provides highly motivated 
political science majors with opportunities to enhance their aca- 
demic program through intensive scholarly study and research 
designed to be of assistance in postgraduate employment or in 
the pursuit of an advanced degree in political science. Contact 
the Department of Political Science for further information con- 
cerning eligibility and application. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



129 



Political Science 



UK I I X.I VIM I K 
riftn COLLEGE 



PI SIGMA ALPHA 

The Department of Political Science has a chapter (the Pi Upsilon 
Chapter) of Pi Sigma Alpha, the national political science honor 
society. Each year, the political science faculty selects and invites 
political science majors who are juniors and seniors and who 
have demonstrated outstanding academic accomplishments to 
join. Each initiate receives an inscribed certificate of membership. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

The Department of Political Science offers the Master of Public 
Administration (MPA) degree. The MPA program provides profes- 
sional education to prepare persons for leadership roles in public 
administration and public affairs at the federal, state and local 
levels with flexible career opportunities in both the public and 
nonprofit sectors. 

Program Description 

Course work 

The MPA program accommodates the needs of both precareer 
students and in-career professionals by offering alternative pro- 
gram requirements that take into account the student's academic 
and professional background. Students with a bachelor's degree 
and no professional work experience are expected to complete 
a 45-credit-hour degree program (including six hours of profes- 
sional internship), while in-career professionals are expected to 
complete a 39-credit-hour program. Up to six hours of appropri- 
ate graduate course work taken elsewhere may be transferred 
into the degree program. 

The MPA Curriculum 

Both precareer and in-career students must complete a 24-hour 
MPA core curriculum component of the degree program. These 

courses are: 

Credits 



POLI 501 Introduction to Public Institutions 

and Administration 3 

POLI 510 Introduction to Research in 

Public Administration 3 

POLI 51 1 Program Evaluation and Policy Analysis 3 

POLI 521 Public Finance 3 

POLI 531 Public Personnel 3 

POLI 532 Organizational Theory and Behavior for Public 

and Nonprofit Institutions 3 

POLI 541 Legislative-Executive Relations 3 

or 

POLI 542 Administrative Law and Regulation 

POLI 591 Capstone Seminar in Public Administration 3 

All students are also required to complete 15 hours 



of electives of which three credits must be in POLI 506 
Public Administration module. Precareer students 
must complete an additional six hours in POLI 598 

Internship in Public Administration 15 

Total minimum credits: 39 



Concentrations 

There are two areas in which an MPA candidate may concen \ 
trate; elective courses are available in each of the areas. As an 
alternative to earning a degree within a concentration area, stu- 
dents may pursue a generalist MPA track. For students seeking 
to earn a degree in a concentration, a minimum of three elective 
courses must be taken in the substantive area. The substantive 
concentration areas are as follows: 

• Civic and Nonprofit Leadership and Administration 

• Sustainable Community Development 

An additional three hours must be taken in three one-credit pro- 
fessional development modules. 

Admission Requirements 

Detailed information about admissions is provided in the "School 
of Graduate Studies" section of the catalog. 

• A bachelor's degree from a four-year accredited college or 
university; if the degree has not yet been awarded at the 
time of application, the successful applicant must be nearing 
completion of the bachelor's degree 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75, an acceptable GRE 
score and an interview with the MPA program faculty. To 
receive a clear admit status, MPA applicants must have a 
composite score of 900 or greater on the quantitative and 
verbal parts of the GRE General Test. To receive a conditional 
acceptance, MPA applicants must have a composite score 

of 700-899 on the quantitative and verbal parts of the GRE 
General Test 

• A resume 

• Three letters of recommendation should come from profes- 
sors or practitioners familiar with the student's academic 
ability. Students failing to meet the standard graduate admis- 
sions criteria may also be considered on a conditional basis of 
acceptance 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

Contact the School of Graduate Studies to receive a catalog and 
application material. 

MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

No Concentration 



Core Courses Credits 

POLI 501 Introduction to Public Institutions 

and Administration 3 

POLI 510 Introduction to Research in Public Administration 3 

POLI 51 1 Program Evaluation and Policy Analysis 3 

POLI 521 Public Finance 3 

POLI 531 Public Personnel 3 

POLI 532 Organizational Theory and Behavior for 

Public and Nonprofit Institutions 3 

POLI 541 Legislative-Executive Relations 3 

or 

POLI 542 Administrative Law and Regulation 
POLI 591 Capstone Seminar in Public Administration 3 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



bSc 



BRIDGEWATER 



STATE COLLEGE 



Political Science 



Electives 15 

As part of the 1 5 credits required in electives, each student 
must take three one-credit professional development modules 
(POLI 506 Public Administration Module) 

The remaining 1 2 credits in electives must be selected, with 
adviser approval, from the 500-level Political Science (POLI) 
course offerings. 

Total minimum credit: 39 

Internship 

Students with a bachelor's degree and no professional 
work experience must complete a six-credit internship in 

addition to the requirements above 6 

NOTE: Internship (598), directed study or research (503 and 
502), and special topics (592) in political science credits may 
be applied to the four elective courses and other concentration 
requirements only if they are related to the student's concentra- 
tion. This determination is made by the MPA coordinator. 

Total minimum credits: 45 



MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Civic and Nonprofit Leadership and Administration 
Concentration 

The purpose of the civic and nonprofit leadership and 
administration concentration is to develop leadership and admin- 
istrative skills in strengthening organizational capacity, fostering 
civic and democratic life, and building social capital through 
understanding of the historical, political, economic, social and 
technological aspects of civic and nonprofit organizations. 



Core Courses Credits 

POLI 501 Introduction to Public Institutions and 

Administration 3 

POLI 510 Introduction to Research in Public Administration 3 

POLI 511 Program Evaluation and Policy Analysis 3 

POLI 521 Public Finance 3 

POLI 531 Public Personnel 3 

POLI 532 Organizational Theory and Behavior for Public 

and Nonprofit Institutions 3 

POLI 541 Legislative-Executive Relations 3 

or 

POLI 542 Administrative Law and Regulation 
POLI 591 Capstone Seminar in Public Administration 3 

Electives 15 



As part of the 1 5 credits required in electives, each student 
must take three one-credit professional development modules 
(POLI 506 Public Administration Module) 

The remaining 1 2 credits in electives must be selected from 
the courses listed below: 

POLI 502 Research 
POLI 503 Directed Study 

POLI 513 Strategic Planning and Performance Measurement 

in Public Administration 
POLI 533 Administrative Ethics 
POLI 534 Public Service Leadership 
POLI 571 Introduction to Nonprofit Theory and Management 



POLI 572 Strategies for Successful Nonprofits: Fundraising 
POLI 592 Special Topics in Public Administration 
POLI 598 Internship: Public Administration 

Total minimum credits: 39 

Internship 

Students with a bachelor's degree and no professional 
work experience must complete a six-credit internship 

in addition to the requirements above 6 

NOTE: Internship (598), directed study or research (503 and 
502), and special topics (592) in political science credits may 
be applied to the four elective courses and other concentration 
requirements only if they are related to the student's concentra- 
tion. This determination is made by the MPA coordinator. 

Total minimum credits: 45 



MASTER OF PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Sustainable Community Development Concentration 

The purpose of the sustainable community development con- 
centration is to develop leadership and administrative skills in 
integrating sustainable economic development, environmental 
protection, and social well-being at local, regional, national and 
international levels of governance. 



Core Courses Credits 

POLI 501 Introduction to Public Institutions 

and Administration 3 

POLI 510 Introduction to Research in Public Administration 3 

POLI 51 1 Program Evaluation and Policy Analysis 3 

POLI 521 Public Finance 3 

POLI 531 Public Personnel 3 

POLI 532 Organizational Theory and Behavior for 

Public and Nonprofit Institutions 3 

POLI 541 Legislative-Executive Relations 3 

or 

POLI 542 Administrative Law and Regulation 
POLI 591 Capstone Seminar in Public Administration 3 

Electives 15 



As part of the 1 5 credits required in electives, each student must 
take three one-credit professional development modules (POLI 
506 Public Administration Module) 

The remaining 12 credits in electives must be selected from 
the courses listed below: 

POLI 502 Research 
POLI 503 Directed Study 

POLI 513 Strategic Planning and Performance Measurement 

in Public Administration 
POLI 533 Administrative Ethics 
POLI 534 Public Service Leadership 
POLI 551 Managing Economic and Community Development 
POLI 552 Municipal Organization and Management 
POLI 561 Sustainable Development and Globalization in 

Public Administration 
POLI 592 Special Topics in Public Administration 
POLI 598 Internship: Public Administration 

Total minimum credits: 39 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

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131 



Political Science 



bSc 



BRIDOfcWV I KH 
STATE GOUMI 



Internship 

Students with a bachelor's degree and no professional work 
experience must complete a six-credit internship in addition 

to the requirements listed above (6) 

NOTE: Internship (598), directed study or research (503 and 
502), and special topics (592) in political science credits may 
be applied to the four elective courses and other concentration 
requirements only if they are related to the student's concentra- 
tion. This determination is made by the MPA coordinator. 

Total minimum credits: 45 

Exit Requirement 

The MPA program offers some degree of flexibility for exit 
from this program. All students are required to fulfill an exit 
requirement, which in most cases will require passing a written 
comprehensive examination. This one-day examination allows 
program faculty to test students' mastery of fundamental prin- 
ciples and issues covered in the core curriculum. Students must 
have completed at least 30 hours of the degree program to sit 
for the examination and will have two opportunities to pass the 
examination. 

In appropriate circumstances, such as a student interested in 
pursuing further graduate work at the doctoral level, a master's 
thesis may be substituted for the comprehensive examination. 
Students approved for this option must complete the 39- to 45- 
credit program, depending on their program admission category. 
The master's thesis will carry an additional six hours of graduate 
credit. Credit for a public service internship is granted under this 
option if the student completes both an internship and a thesis 
plus 39 hours of course work for a total of 51 hours of credit. The 
thesis option is especially appropriate for students wishing to 
pursue a doctorate after completing the MPA, but is open to all 
students who meet the criteria established by the department. 
Departmental standards require the student to work closely 
with his/her adviser and to phase the work so that the project 
proposal is carefully designed and approved before the student 
advances to the next stage. 



Distinctive Features of the Program 

• Professional Development Modules 

The program requires that students register for a minimum of 
three one-credit modules, offered each semester on topics of 
special relevance to public service. Normally these modules 
are taught on Saturdays during the semester. 

• Internships 

A six-credit internship experience (depending upon pro- 
fessional experience) at the local, state or federal level is 
required for all preprofessional students and will be available 
as an elective for those professionals who wish to enhance 
their background. 



132 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Psychology 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Assistant Professor Jonathan Holmes 

Graduate Program Coordinator: 

Associate Professor John Calicchia 

Professors: Elizabeth Englander, Ruth Hannon, Margaret 
Johnson, Orlando Olivares, David Richards, Susan Todd 

Associate Professors: Teresa King, Sandra Neargarder, 
Jeffrey Nicholas, Elizabeth Spievak 

Assistant Professors: Tina Jameson, Michelle Mamberg, 
Amanda Shyne, Melissa Singer 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1385 

Location: Hart Hall, Room 325 

Web site: www.bridgew.edu/psychology 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BS in Psychology 

Concentrations: Child Psychology, Industrial and 
Organizational Psychology, Medical and Health Psychology 

• MA - Psychology 

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• Psychology 

• Forensic Psychology* 
interdisciplinary Minor 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

The objectives of the Department of Psychology are to 
1) provide all students with an understanding of psychology 
and what psychologists do; 2) give students (where applicable) 
a background in psychology that will help them do their jobs 
better; 3) give our terminal majors sufficient training to enhance 
their opportunities for vocational placement in psychology- 
related occupations; 4) give our majors who intend to become 
professional psychologists sufficient preparation to permit them 
to be competitive in achieving admission to and success in 
graduate schools. 

Note: The Bachelor of Arts in Psychology is inactive. 
PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR 

Grade Requirement Credits 

A psychology major who receives a " C " or below in any 
psychology (PSYC) course applied to the major must repeat the 
course(s) for a higher grade. Please see "Repeat Courses" in the 
"Undergraduate Academic Policies" section of this catalog. 

PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 

PSYC 201 Statistics for Psychology 3 

or 

MATH 110 Elementary Statistics I 

(MAT 110 Elementary Statistics I is accepted but not 

recommended) 



PSYC 224 Child Psychology 3 

or 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 

PSYC 242 Biopsychology 3 

PSYC 252 Psychology of Learning 3 

PSYC 310 Social Psychology 3 

PSYC 320 Research Methods in Psychology 3 

PSYC 360 Psychology of Personality 3 

In addition, psychology majors must select five elective courses 
as follows: 

Advanced Psychological Studies 

Select one of the following courses 3 

PSYC 303 Survey of Psychological Testing 

PSYC 319 History of Psychology 

PSYC 350 Special Topics in Psychology 

PSYC 404 Attitude and Personality Measurement 

PSYC 421 Psychology of Human Differences 

PSYC 460 Neuropsychology 

PSYC 490 Senior Seminar (Writing Intensive in the Major 
Core Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) 

Biobehavioral, Cognitive, and Social Psychological 
Studies 

Select one of the following courses 3 

PSYC 210 Applied Social Psychology 

PSYC 230 Cross-Cultural Psychology 

PSYC 280 Consumer Psychology 

PSYC 305 Psychology of Personnel Selection 

PSYC 313 Industrial and Organizational Psychology 

PSYC 337 Cognitive Psychology 

PSYC 344 Drugs and Human Behavior 

PSYC 355 Behavior Analysis 

PSYC 385 Environmental Psychology 

PSYC 440 Sensation and Perception 

PSYC 445 Psychology of Consciousness 

PSYC 474 Forensic Psychology 

Clinical Studies and Practicum and Research 

Select one of the following courses 3 

PSYC 269 Psychology of Criminal Behavior 

PSYC 365 Health Psychology 

PSYC 370 Abnormal Psychology 

PSYC 470 Clinical Psychology ' 

PSYC 475 Psychology of Group Behavior 

PSYC 492 Seminar: Clinical Methods in Medical Psychology 

PSYC 494 Clinical Practicum: Forensic Psychology 

PSYC 495 Practicum: Medical Psychology 

PSYC 496 Personnel Practicum 

PSYC 497 Research 

PSYC 498 Clinical Practicum 

PSYC 499 Directed Study in Psychology 

Additional Electives 

Any two psychology courses 6 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



133 



Psychology 



UK 1 1 H.I WM I H 



Cognate Requirement 

One biology laboratory course from the following 4 

BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 
BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 
BIOL 121 General Biology I 

Total minimum credits: 43 
Students enrolled prior to fall 1987 and transfer students 
enrolled prior to September 1989 are required to complete a for- 
eign language through the intermediate level or its equivalent. 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



CHILD PSYCHOLOGY CONCENTRATION 

The concentration in child psychology provides students with a 
more specialized education in the field of child psychology and 
development and knowledge of psychological testing and inter- 
ventions used with children. 

Grade Requirement 

A psychology major must receive a "C" or better in any 
psychology (PSYC) course applied to the major. Otherwise, a 
student must repeat the course(s) for a higher grade. Please see 
"Repeat Courses" in the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

Credits 



PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 

PSYC 201 Statistics for Psychology 3 

(MATH 110 Elementary Statistics I is accepted but 
not recommended) 

PSYC 224 Child Psychology 3 

PSYC 242 Biopsychology 3 

PSYC 252 Psychology of Learning 3 

PSYC 310 Social Psychology 3 

PSYC 320 Research Methods in Psychology 3 

PSYC 360 Psychology of Personality 3 

Choose one (Testing) 3 

PSYC 303 Survey of Psychological Testing 

PSYC 404 Attitude and Personality Measurement 

PSYC 421 Psychology of Human Differences 
Choose one (Cognitive Development) 3 

PSYC 327 Psychology of Exceptional Children 

PSYC 328 Psychology of Mental Retardation 

PSYC 337 Cognitive Psychology 
Choose one (Biological Development in Children) 4 

BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 

BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 
Choose one (Abnormal Psychology) 3 

PSYC 325 Developmental Psychopathology 



PSYC 370 Abnormal Psychology 
Choose one (Elective) .^,3 

(Note: PSYC 226 and PSYC 227 may not be taken 
as an elective. See below.) 

PSYC 210 Applied Social Psychology 

PSYC 230 Cross-Cultural Psychology 

PSYC 269 Psychology of Criminal Behavior 

PSYC 319 History of Psychology 

PSYC 344 Drugs and Human Behavior 

PSYC 350 Special Topics in Psychology 

PSYC 355 Behavior Analysis 

PSYC 365 Health Psychology 

PSYC 385 Environmental Psychology 

PSYC 470 Clinical Psychology 

PSYC 490 Senior Seminar (Writing Intensive in the Major 
Core Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) 
Choose one 3 

SCWK 334 Intervention with Family Systems 

SCWK 392 Treating Childhood Sexual Abuse 

SOCI 103 Social Problems 

SOCI203 The Family 

SOCI 322 Sociology of Childhood 
The following courses may be taken but will not be counted 
toward the minimum major requirements and the child psychol- 
ogy concentration requirements. 

PSYC 226 Adolescent Psychology 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 
Note: To substitute PSYC 350 Special Topics in Psychology for 
any requirement on this list, a student must have the permission 
of his or her adviser and the chairperson of the Department of 
Psychology. 

Total minimum credits: 43 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Psychology 



INDUSTRIAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL 
PSYCHOLOGY CONCENTRATION 

This concentration will provide students with an understanding 
of the psychological principles related to personnel work and the 
application of these principles to business and industry. 

Grade Requirement 

A psychology major must receive a "C" or better in any 
psychology (PSYC) course applied to the major. Otherwise, a 
student must repeat the course(s) for a higher grade. Please see 
"Repeat Courses" in the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

Credits 



PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 

PSYC 201 Statistics for Psychology 3 

(MATH 110 Elementary Statistics I is accepted but 
not recommended) 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 3 

PSYC 242 Biopsychology 3 

PSYC 252 Psychology of Learning 3 

PSYC 310 Social Psychology 3 

PSYC 320 Research Methods in Psychology 3 

PSYC 360 Psychology of Personality 3 

Additional requirements 

PSYC 210 Applied Social Psychology 3 

PSYC 303 Survey of Psychological Testing 3 

or 

PSYC 404 Attitude and Personality Measurement 

PSYC 305 Psychology of Personnel Selection 3 

PSYC 313 Industrial and Organizational Psychology 3 

PSYC 321 Psychology of Human Differences 3 

PSYC 496 Personnel Practicum 3 

One biology laboratory course from the following 4 



BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 



BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 
BIOL 121 General Biology I 

Also required 

ACFI 240 Principles of Accounting I 3 

or 

COMP 105 Computers and Their Applications: An Introduction 

ENGL 201 Technical Writing I 3 

HIST 462 American Labor History 3 

SOCI 332 Sociology of Organizations 3 

or 

SOCI 350 Sociology of Work 
One course from the following 3 



COMM 303 Introduction to Organizational Communication 
ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics 
ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics 

Total minimum credits: 61 



Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 120 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



MEDICAL AND HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY 
CONCENTRATION 

Grade Requirement 

A psychology major must receive a "C" or better in any 
psychology (PSYC) course applied to the major. Otherwise, a 
student must repeat the course(s) for a higher grade. Please see 
"Repeat Courses" in the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

Credits 



PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 

PSYC 201 Statistics for Psychology 3 

(MATH 110 Elementary Statistics I is accepted but 
not recommended) 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 3 

PSYC 242 Biopsychology 3 

PSYC 252 Psychology of Learning 3 

PSYC 310 Social Psychology 3 

PSYC 320 Research Methods in Psychology 3 

PSYC 360 Psychology of Personality 3 

Additional requirements 

PSYC 303 Survey of Psychological Testing 3 

PSYC 344 Drugs and Human Behavior 3 

or 

PSYC 355 Behavior Analysis 

PSYC 365 Health Psychology 3 

PSYC 492 Seminar: Clinical Methods in Medical Psychology 3 

PSYC 495 Practicum: Medical Psychology 3 

One biology laboratory course from the following 4 

BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 

BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 

BIOL 121 General Biology I 

Also required 

ANTH 330 Medical Anthropology 3 

or 

SOCI 307 Medical Sociology 

CHEM 102 Chemistry in Everyday Life 3 

or 

PHYS 102 Modern Physics for the Humanist 

ENGL 201 Technical Writing I 3 

PHIL 205 Medical Ethics 3 

SCWK 400 Social Services in the Health Care Field 3 



Total minimum credits: 61 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



135 



Psychology 




Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 120 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

It is strongly recommended that all psychology majors plan 
ning further work in psychology at the graduate level take PSYC 
319 History of Psychology. Such students should also elect 
courses that will develop their computational and writing skills. 
In addition, some computer literacy is advantageous. 



DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION AND SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major in psychology and elemen- 
tary education, early childhood education or special education 
for licensure purposes. Appropriate advising materials with sug- 
gested course sequences are available. 



FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY 
INTERDISCIPLINARY MINOR 



Required Courses Credits 

PSYC 269 Psychology of Criminal Behavior 3 

PSYC 370 Abnormal Psychology 3 

PSYC 474 Forensic Psychology 3 

PSYC 494 Clinical Practicum: Forensic Psychology 3 

SOCI 228 Criminology 3 

Select one course from the following electives 3 

CRJU 354 Corrections 

CRJU/SOCI 255 Juvenile Delinquency 

CRJU/SOCI 334 White Collar Crime 

SOCI 310 Women and Crime 

SOCI 313 Family Violence 



Note: Only two courses may be counted toward the minor that 
have already been counted toward the student's major. 

Course Sequence 

PSYC 100 must be taken before any other PSYC course. 
PSYC 269 must be taken before PSYC 494. 
SOCI 228 must be taken before the SOCI elective is taken. 
For further information concerning the forensic psychology inter- 
disciplinary minor contact Dr. Elizabeth Englander at 
eenglander@bridgew.edu or 508.53 1 . 1 385. 

Total minimum credits: 18 



PSYCHOLOGY MINOR Credits 

PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 

Five other psychology courses to fit the needs 

of the individual student 15 



Total minimum credits: 18 



HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in psychology provides highly motivated ' 
psychology majors with opportunities to enhance their academic 
program through intensive scholarly study and research designed 
to be of assistance in postgraduate employment or in the pursuit 
of an advanced degree in psychology. Contact the Department of 
Psychology for further information concerning eligibility 
and application. 



GRADUATE PROGRAM 



MASTER OF ARTS 

The Department of Psychology offers a graduate program leading 
to the Master of Arts in psychology. This program, which prepares 
the student to sit for the examination for licensure as a mental 
health counselor in Massachusetts, equips students to help indi- 
viduals who may have a variety of behavioral, cognitive and emo- 
tional challenges. It may also serve as a steppingstone to further 
graduate training (PhD or PsyD). 

The Master of Arts degree in psychology is a clinical program 
with a curriculum designed to provide a firm foundation in the 
understanding of human behavior and clinical disorders, as well 
as specific skills in psychotherapy and psychological assessment. 
Research methods and statistics are emphasized as essential 
tools for clinical professionals - e.g., in performing clinical out- 
come studies and program evaluations, and in staying current 
with the empirical literature. Students are exposed to a range of 
empirically supported therapeutic methods, with special empha- 
sis on cognitive-behavioral techniques. Experiential learning is an 
essential component of the program, with 1 5 credits of practica 
and internships required. 

Admission Requirements 

• GRE General test scores 

• Three letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

• Applicants must possess an undergraduate degree in either 
psychology or a closely related field 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0, above-average GRE 
scores and some experience in the field 

• Final candidates will also receive a personal interview from 
the Admissions Committee 



136 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Psychology 



Requirements for the Degree 

Students must complete a minimum of 61 approved graduate 
credits for the Master of Arts degree in psychology. Students 
must complete a written comprehensive examination before 
graduation. Students who complete a thesis may substitute their 
oral defense for the written examination. 

All students will complete a minimum 45-credit academic core 
and 1 5-credit clinical core (including practicum and internship). 

• Academic Core 

First Year Courses 

The following courses must be taken within the Department 



of Psychology. 

Fall Credits 

PSYC 505 Research Methods and Design I 3 

PSYC 509 Foundations of Clinical Practice 3 

PSYC 51 1 Theories of Psychotherapy 3 

Spring 

PSYC 506 Research Methods and Design II 3 

PSYC 512 Evaluation Techniques 3 

PSYC 575 Psychopathology 3 

Second Year Courses 



First year courses must be completed before beginning sec- 



ond year courses. 
Fall 

PSYC 500 Developmental Human Psychology 3 

PSYC 541 Psychotherapy: Theory and Practice I 3 

Spring 

PSYC 513 Psychopharmacologyfor 

Nonmedical Professionals 3 

PSYC 542 Psychotherapy: Theory and Practice II 3 

• Other Program Requirements 

The following courses may be taken at any time, assuming 
any prerequisites have been met. 

PSYC 508 Advanced Seminar 3 

PSYC 516 Multicultural Counseling 3 

PSYC 517 Career Information and Placement 3 

PSYC 518 Theory and Process of Group Interaction 3 

• Seminar and Research 

All students are required to complete one of the following 
two courses. 

PSYC 504 Research (Thesis) 4 

or 

PSYC 508 Advanced Seminar 



• Clinical Core 

All students must complete 100 hours of practicum and 600 
hours of internship. 

PSYC 591 Clinical Practicum 3 

PSYC 592 Internship 

(maximum of six credits each semester) 12 

Important: Only 500-level courses will be accepted for credit 
in the MA program in psychology. Matriculating students 
may not transfer any second year courses into the program. 
Under current guidelines established by the commonwealth, 
students completing the program of study in psychology will 
be eligible (after completing the required number of post- 
graduate supervised clinical hours) to sit for the examination 
for licensure as a mental health counselor in Massachusetts. 

Total minimum credits: 61 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



137 



Social Work 



bSc 



BRIDCEWATER 

STATE COLLfcCifc 



FACULTY 

Chairperson and Graduate Program Coordinator: 

Professor Spencer Zeiger 

Professors: Rebecca Leavitt, Anna Martin-Jerald 

Associate Professors: Mark Brenner, Lucinda King-Frode, 
Beverly Lovett 

Assistant Professors: Arnaa Alcon, Barbara Bond, 
Emily Douglas, Karen Fein, Sabrina Gentlewarrior, 
Jude Gonsalvez, Emily Mann, David O'Malley 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1389 

Location: Burrill Office Complex 

Web site: www.bridgew.edu/socialwork 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BS in Social Work 

• MSW Social Work 

UNDERGRADUATE MINOR 

• Social Welfare 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

The Department of Social Work offers an undergraduate program 
leading to the Bachelor of Science degree. A minor in social 
welfare is also available. The curriculum is designed to prepare 
students for beginning generalist professional practice in social 
work and other human service fields. Students learn social work 
methods, theories, values and ethics for practice with various 
populations and, especially, with the region's diverse and vulner- 
able populations. The program builds on a liberal arts perspec- 
tive, providing students with a foundation for critical thinking, 
effective communication and ethical behavior that will be of daily 
importance to them in professional practice. 

Career opportunities are vast and varied and include positions in 
child protective services, juvenile justice and mental health; domestic 
abuse, family court and probation; residential settings in chronic care 
and elder services. Social work majors also complete the program 
well prepared for graduate study and may be eligible for consider- 
ation for advanced standing at some graduate schools of 
social work. 

The college's programs within the Department of Social Work, 
both the BS and MSW degrees, are accredited by the Council on 
Social Work Education, allowing graduates to apply for social 
.work licensure in Massachusetts at the licensed social worker 
(LSW) level after completing their bachelor's degree and at the 
LCSW level after completing their MSW degree. 

The program integrates theory with field experience through 
three required courses held in conjunction with a variety of com- 
munity social service agencies. SCWK 250 Introduction to Social 
Welfare acquaints students with the field as they participate 
in 30 hours of community service in a social service agency. In 



SCWK 338 Introduction to Social Work Practice, students spend a 
minimum of 90 hours during one semester at an agency learn- 
ing how it functions and about the professional roles of social 
workers. This course lays the foundation for the senior year field 
experience course (SCWK 498). The field experience meets from 
September through May and entails a minimum of 410 hours 
under the supervision of a professional social worker at the 
Master of Social Work level. Each of these courses is described in 
detail in the "Course Descriptions" section of this catalog. 

Note: The Bachelor of Arts in Social Work is inactive. 



SOCIAL WORK MAJOR 

Grade Requirement 

A minimum grade of "C-" is required in all social work (SCWK) 
and cognate courses required in the major coursework with a 
grade lower than "C-" must be repeated prior to graduation. 
Please see "Repeat Courses" in the "Undergraduate Academic 
Policies" section of this catalog. 

Credits 

SCWK 250 Introduction to Social Welfare 3 

SCWK 270 Social Work Issues of Diversity and Oppression 3 

SCWK 320 Human Behavior and Social Environment 1 3 

SCWK 321 Human Behavior and Social Environment II 3 

SCWK 338 Introduction to Social Work Practice 3 

SCWK 350 Social Welfare Policy 3 

SCWK 375 Data Analysis for Social Work 3 

or 

PSYC 201 Statistics for Psychology 
or 

SOCI 391 Seminar: Social Data Analysis 

SCWK 380 Research Methods in Social Work 3 

SCWK 431 Social Work Practice with Individuals, 

Families and Groups 3 

SCWK 432 Social Work Practice with Communities 

and Organizations 3 

SCWK 498 Field Experience in Social Work (two semesters; 

six credits each semester) 12 

Elective 

One course in social work 3 

Required cognates 

PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 

SOCI 102 Introduction to Sociology 3 

One semester in a biology course (choose one) 3 

BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 

BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 

BIOL 110 Biology: A Human Approach 

BIOL 111 Human Heredity 

BIOL 112 Biology and Human Thought 

BIOL 115 Microbial World and You 

BIOL 117 The Biological Environment 

BIOL 121 General Biology I 

BIOL 128 The Biology of Human Sexuality 



138 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Social Work 



Recommended Social Work Electives 

SCWK/WMST 304 The Psychosocial Development of Women 
SCWK 305 Child Welfare 

SCWK 333 Current Issues in Aging: A Multidisciplinary 

Perspective 
SCWK 334 Intervention with Family Systems 
SCWK 376 Social Work with Adolescents and Young Adults 
SCWK 392 Treating Childhood Sexual Abuse 
SCWK 399 Special Topics in Social Work 
SCWK 415 Social Services in Alcohol and Substance Abuse 
SCWK 435 School Social Work - History, Theory and Issues 
SCWK 446 Social Work Practice with Groups 
SCWK 499 Directed Study in Social Work 

Total minimum credits: 54 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in social work provides highly motivated 
social work majors with opportunities to enhance their academic 
program through intensive scholarly study and research designed 
to be of assistance in postgraduate employment or in the pursuit 
of an advanced degree in social work. Contact the Department of 
Social Work for further information concerning eligibility 
and application. 



SOCIAL WELFARE MINOR 

This minor seeks to acquaint students in majors and preprofes- 
sional programs that interface with social work (e.g., sociology, 
psychology, anthropology, health, education, counseling, busi- 
ness, prelaw, premedicine, recreation) with the evolution of the 
social welfare structure in the United States (SCWK 250), the 
policies that result in social welfare programs (SCWK 350) and 
populations at particular risk (SCWK 270). 

Required courses Credits 

SCWK 250 Introduction to Social Welfare 3 

SCWK 270 Social Work Issues of Diversity and Oppression 3 

SCWK 320 Human Behavior and Social Environment 1 3 

SCWK 350 Social Welfare Policy 3 

Six additional credits in social work elective courses 

with the exception of SCWK 338, SCWK 431, 

SCWK 432 and SCWK 498 6 

Total minimum credits: 18 



ADMISSION TO THE SOCIAL WORK 
PROGRAM 

Admission Requirements 

To be formally admitted to the social work program, a 
student must: 

• Meet with an assigned social work adviser. 

• Complete a minimum of 36 hours of Core Curriculum 
Requirements that include ENGL 101 Writing I and ENGL 
102 Writing II, COMM 130 Human Communication Skills, 
SOC1 102 Introduction to Sociology, and a biology course 
(see list under Required Cognates). PSYC 100 Introductory 
Psychology is also required. 

• Have completed 60 hours of course work with a minimum 
overall GPA of 2.5 and a minimum GPA of 2.7 in social work. 
Students with a GPA between 2.0 and 2.5 may petition the 
social work program admissions committee that they be 
accepted into the major due to special circumstances. If the 
decision of the committee is favorable, such students will be 
granted conditional acceptance only to the program. 

• Have completed SCWK 250 and SCWK 270 with a social 
work course GPA (not including cognates) of 2.7 and no 
social work course grades below "C-". Students falling 
slightly below these standards will have their grade 
performance reviewed by the social work program 
admission committee. 

• Demonstrate competency in oral and written communica- 
tion since such skills are fundamental to and utilized in 
everyday social work practice. Students must have com- 
pleted ENGL 101 Writing I, ENGL 102 Writing II and COMM 
130 Human Communication skills with a minimum grade of 
"C+" in each course. A grade of "C" or "C-" in one of these 
courses may be accepted if the student agrees to consult the 
Writing Center and give proof that basic skill problems in a 
given area are identified and addressed. 

• Complete an application for admission to the social work 
program. This application includes basic biographical data, 
information on employment and volunteer experiences, and 
a two-to-four-page self-evaluation of the student's inter- 
est, readiness and suitability for a career in social work. The 
purpose of the self-evaluation is to reflect the applicant's 
commitment to the goals and purposes of social work. The 
application is available through trie student's assigned 
faculty adviser in the Department of Social Work. The appli- 
cation should be reviewed by the student's adviser and an 
additional social work faculty member. 

• Submit a copy of his/her degree audit that provides an up- 
to-date indication of cumulative and social work GPAs. 

• Be successfully reviewed by the social work faculty. All 
information obtained through the admission process will be 
held in confidence. Knowingly making a false oral or writ- 
ten statement during the admission process could result in 
denial of admission to the program. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

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139 



Social Work 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



• Sign a statement indicating that he/she has read and will 
follow the National Association of Social Worker's Code of 
Ethics. This code is printed in the Encyclopedia of Social Work 
and is available through the NASW Web site (www.naswdc. 
org). 

Applicants are notified in writing by the social work program 
admissions committee about the outcome of the admission 
process. 

Only social work courses from four-year colleges accred- 
ited by the Council on Social Work Education will be granted 
equivalency credit with the possible exception of SCWK 250. 
Transfer students must provide evidence that these courses 
sufficiently correspond with the goals and objectives specified 
in courses within the Department of Social Work curriculum. 
Performance evaluations of any fieldwork courses completed are 
also required. The only other course exception would be below 
300-level required social work course offered on an off-campus 
site by a Bridgewater State College social work faculty person or 
other CSWE qualified social work faculty, provided the course is 
fully duplicative of the same course in the Department of Social 
Work's curriculum as determined through the official articulated 
agreement by the faculty after review. 

Admission to SCWK 338 Introduction to Social Work 
Practice 

Students are eligible for admission to SCWK 338, the combined 
initial practice course and junior year field work experience, 
after being formally admitted into the social work program. They 
should have completed SCWK 320 or be taking it concurrently. 
A GPA of 2.7 in social work courses and 2.5 overall must be 
achieved prior to admission to SCWK 338. Students must also 
complete the department's Junior Prospective Intern Data Form 
and the Practicum/lnternship Form required by the School of Arts 
and Sciences. 

The social work faculty's field education coordinator discusses 
the placement with the student and arranges for an agency con- 
tad. The student then meets with the agency supervisor to dis- 
cuss the placement, mutual expectations and available learning 
opportunities. A final decision is reached by the field education 
coordinator after consultation with the student and the agency 
supervisor. Suggested readings and preplacement contacts are 
worked out on an individual basis. 

Admission to SCWK 498 Field Experience in 
Social Work 

A student is eligible for placement in SCWK 498, the 4 1 0+ 
clock hour senior year fieldwork experience, after being formally 
admitted into the social work program and after completing 
SCWK 320 and SCWK 338. In the spring semester each stu- 
dent applying for senior field placement is required to make 
an appointment with the field coordinator to discuss options 
and procedures. Applications are due no later than Feb. 1 5 for 
placement in the following fall. Placements are from September 
to May and are not available during the summer. Evening and 
weekend placements are not available. 

All applications for field placement are reviewed by the social 
work field education review committee. The needs, strengths 
and interests of the students, as well as availability of agency 



and program placement resources, are discussed. Additionally, 
each applicant is interviewed by the social work field coordina- 
tor. Issues of concern that may have been identified during the 
applicant's program admission interview, if needed, are to be 
addressed with the applicant. Goals for the student and possible 
agency options are explored. A particular setting will be recom- 
mended on the basis of these variables. 

The field education coordinator discusses the placement with 
the student and arranges for an agency contact. The student 
then meets with the agency supervisor to discuss the placement, 
mutual expectations and available learning opportunities A final 
decision is reached by the field education coordinator after con- 
sultation with the student and the agency supervisor. Suggested 
readings and preplacement contacts are worked out on an indi 
vidual basis. 

It is recommended that each student join the National 
Association of Social Workers during the semester prior to 
field placement. 

Retention in the Social Work Major 

Students must remain in full compliance with all requirements, 
policies and procedures of the Department of Social Work, the 
college and the Council on Social Work Education. Students 
may be terminated from the social work program if, in the 
professional judgement of the social work faculty, violations of 
professional and/or ethical codes have occurred. These viola- 
tions are discussed in detail in the department's admission, 
termination and appeals policies and procedures. Dismissal from 
two field placements due to unacceptable performance and/or 
two or more failures in any social work course may result in the 
termination of the student from the social work program. All 
students wishing to pursue a major in social work are strongly 
urged to obtain a copy of this document from the Department of 
Social Work. Course work with a grade lower than "C-" must be 
repeated prior to graduation. 



GRADUATE PROGRAM 



MASTER IN SOCIAL WORK 

Mission 

Bridgewater State College's Master in Social Work (MSW) 
accredited program reflects the purposes of social work educa- 
tion nationally and internationally. The mission of the MSW 
program is to prepare advanced professional practitioners to 
address regional needs, promote social justice, and enhance the 
strengths and resilience of communities, families and individu- 
als. The program will prepare advanced professionals who are 
grounded in resilience theory and a strengths-based approach 
for intergenerational practice. This approach will work with client 
systems by building and reinforcing the client's strengths and 
resources to address areas of concern. Attention is given to the 
intergenerational system, to identify what can be done to effect 
change and strengthen relationships among individuals, groups 
and community components in order to promote greater self-suf- 
ficiency and constructive functioning. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Social Work 



bSc 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



The Curriculum 

In order to prepare graduates to work successfully with a variety 
of client systems often presenting multiple, complex problems, 
the MSW program provides a resilience theory and strengths- 
based approach for intergenerational practice that incorporates 
content on the profession's history, purpose and philosophy and 
a specific body of knowledge, values and skills. The curriculum 
emphasizes critical and creative thinking that enables alumni to 
initiate, adapt and evaluate interactions for the demographic and 
cultural groups in our region. 

The foundation year includes 30 credits with content on 
social work values and ethics, diversity and social and economic 
justice, human behavior and the social environment, social wel- 
fare policy and services, social work practice, research and a field 
practicum. First-year students will take the following courses: 

Credits 



SCWK 500 Introduction to Social Welfare Policy: 

History, Programs and Issues 3 

SCWK 502 Dynamics of Diversity and Oppression 3 

SCWK 508 Introduction to Social Policy 3 

SCWK 510 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I 3 

SCWK 511 Human Behavior in the Social Environment II 3 

SCWK 530 Social Work Practice 1 3 

SCWK 531 Social Work Practice II: Groups and 

Community-based Practice 3 

SCWK 540 Introductory Social Research 3 

SCWK 590 Field Practice and Seminar 1 3 

SCWK 591 Field Practice and Seminar II 3 



The advanced year, with 32 credits, broadens and deepens 
the foundation content while offering students choices among 
modules or quarter courses that introduce the skills needed 
to work with particularly vulnerable populations. In some 
instances, quarter courses may be combined with semester-long 
courses. Students may also use these electives to take graduate 
courses outside the Department of Social Work, such as those 
in the Master of Public Administration, Master of Science in 
Management, Master of Education in Health Promotion or other 
approved master's degree. 

The advanced year also offers an integrated seminar that 
will require students to draw on their foundation course work in 
human behavior in the social environment, research, policy and 
practice. Second year students will take the following course. 



SCWK 512 Human Behavior in the 

Social Environment III: DSM-IV-TR 3 

SCWK 541 Research: Evaluating Practice... 3 

SCWK 550 Social Work Practice III: Intergenerational 

Strengths-based Practice with Families 3 

SCWK 551 Social Work Practice IV: Intergenerational 

Strengths-based Practice with Individuals 3 

SCWK 570 Integrative Seminar 1 3 

SCWK 572 Social Policy II 3 

SCWK 592 Field Practice III 4 

SCWK 593 Field Practice IV 4 

Electives: four elective courses, 1.5 credits each, 

for a total of six credits 6 



Total minimum credits: 62 



Part-time Program 

Students electing to complete the MSW degree on a part-time 
basis must do so in three years, beginning in the fall semester. 
Designed for students who work during the day, the program 
offers classes in the evening and on weekends. 

Admission Requirements 

The admissions process involves the following components: 

• A completed application to the MSW program, available 
through the School of Graduate Studies. Applications are due 
on Feb. 1 for fall matriculation. 

• An updated resume 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

• A personal statement about interest in master's-level social 
work practice 

• Three letters of reference, ideally from supervisors, faculty 
members and others able to attest to the applicant's 
readiness to undertake graduate education in social work 

• Standardized test scores such as the GREs and the MAT are 
not required, but students are welcome to submit such scores 

• Minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 

The admission committee's decision will be based on the appli- 
cant's demonstrated academic ability, interpersonal skills and 
self-awareness - indicators of the likelihood that the applicant 
can successfully complete the program. In addition, evidence 
of a commitment to the social work profession and to the mis- 
sion of the Bridgewater State College MSW program, and of 
the likely contribution the applicant might make to the citizens 
of Southeastern Massachusetts will be assessed. Social work 
requires the ability to withstand difficult emotional challenges, to 
work with people whose cultural backgrounds and/or personal 
values differ from one's own, and to practice in a demanding and 
changing political and fiscal environment. Special attributes such 
as linguistic ability compatible with those in the region, a demon- 
strated commitment working with underserved populations, and 
particular skills such as those in research and policy implementa- 
tion will be considered. 

Advanced Standing 

Student seeking to enter the program in the second year 
with full advanced standing must meet all of the requirements 
listed above. In addition they must have earned a BSW or 
BA/BS in social work degree from a CSWE-accredited program 
within the last six years. Students who completed their BSW 
degrees more than six years ago will be evaluated individually 
to determine their preparedness for year II. Applicants who wish 
to transfer into the MSW program after completing year I else- 
where will also be considered for advanced standing. Students 
entering with full advanced standing will begin their course work 
in the summer. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



141 



Sociology 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Associate Professor Patricia Fanning 

Professors: Walter Carroll, William Levin, Kim Mac Innis 

Associate Professors: Fang Deng, Henry Vandenburgh 

Assistant Professors: Jodi Cohen, Michele Wakin, 
Jonathan White 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1355 

Location: Burrill Office Complex 

Web site: www.bridgew.edu/sociology 

DEGREE PROGRAM 

• BA in Sociology 

Concentrations: City, Community and Region; Education; 
Global Studies 

UNDERGRADUATE MINOR 

• Sociology 

The Department of Sociology offers a major program in sociol- 
ogy and a minor in sociology. Sociology majors may concentrate 
in City, Community and Region, Education or Global Studies. 
Students may also combine a major in sociology with an 
education major. 

The department provides a strong liberal arts curriculum 
aimed at developing well-rounded, informed citizens with strong 
critical thinking abilities. Department programs also impart skills 
to students, preparing them for a wide range of professions. 
Career options include positions in the criminal justice system, 
education, research, industry, and state and federal agencies. 
The department encourages students to continue on to graduate 
study. 

Many department faculty members engage in research 
and the department encourages student-faculty collaborative 
research. Students may also carry out internships. 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



SOCIOLOGY 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology is the scientific study of 
human social relationships. It allows individuals to understand 
the connections between their own experiences and the society 
in which they live. In carrying on social life, human beings interact 
with each other and construct patterns of relationships, groups, 
classes, institutions and societies. Individuals shape those pat- 
terns and those patterns, in turn, shape individuals and their 
lives. In fact, the central insight of sociology is that social rela- 
tionships and social interactions shape human behavior, attitudes 
and resources. 

Sociology courses provide students with an understand- 
ing of how these social relationships arise, why they persist, 
what effects they have, and how they maintain social order or 



contribute to social change. Students learn the theories and 
research methods used in sociology. Students have opportunities 
to engage in collaborative research with faculty members or to 
participate in internships. These opportunities enable students to 
deepen and apply what they have learned in classes and enhanc- 
es their opportunities in the labor market or in graduate school. 

Note: The Bachelor of Science degree in sociology is inactive. 
SOCIOLOGY MAJOR 

Required Courses Credits 

SOCI 102 Introduction to Sociology 3 

SOCI 290 Seminar: Social Theory 3 

SOCI 370 Sociological Analysis (Writing Intensive in the Major 

Core Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) 3 

SOCI 390 Seminar: Research Methods in Sociology 3 

SOCI 391 Seminar: Social Data Analysis 3 

Plus any one of the following 3 

SOCI 204 Gender, Sexuality and Society 

SOCI 207 Social Inequality 

SOCI 312 Discrimination and Prejudice 

SOCI 315 Race and Ethnicity in America 

SOCI 326 Social Gerontology - Sociology of Aging 

SOCI 330 Women's Roles: Sociology of Sex and Gender 
Plus any one of the following 3 

SOCI 206 Cities and People: Urban Sociology 

SOCI 305 Sociology of Education 

SOCI 307 Medical Sociology 

SOCI 332 Sociology of Organizations 

SOCI 340 Sociology of Politics 

SOCI 350 Sociology of Work 
Plus any one of the following 3 

SOC1 104 Global Social Problems 

SOCI 214 Middle Eastern Societies 

SOCI 217 East Asian Societies: China and Japan 

SOCI 218 Chinese Society and Culture 

SOCI 220 The Developing World 
Plus three additional sociology courses, including those not 

already taken from the above lists, three of which must 

be at the 200 level or above 9 

Capstone Requirement 3 

Students must complete an Honors Thesis (SOCI 485), a research 
project (SOCI 497) or a three-credit internship (SOCI 498). 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, seethe "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

Total minimum credits: 36 



142 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Sociology 



bSc 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



CITY, COMMUNITY AND REGION 
CONCENTRATION 

Required Courses Credits 

SOC1 102 Introduction to Sociology 3 

SOCI 206 Cities and People: Urban Sociology 3 

SOCI 290 Seminar: Social Theory 3 

SOCI 370 Sociological Analysis (Writing Intensive in the Major 

Core Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) 3 

SOCI 390 Seminar: Research Methods in Sociology 3 

SOCI 391 Seminar: Social Data Analysis 3 

Two of the following courses 6 

SOCI 211 Homelessness in U.S. Society 

SOCI 351 Sustainable Cities 

SOCI/CRJU 352 Urban Crime 

SOCI 353 Cities in a Global Context 

SOCI 356 Urban Disasters, Resilient Cities 
One of the following courses 3 

SOCI 207 Social Inequality 

SOCI 315 Race and Ethnicity in America 

SOCI 380 Seminar: Qualitative Methods and 
Urban Ethnography 

SOCI 410 Sociology of Urban Planning and Policy 

SOCI 426 Urban Enclaves 
Plus one additional sociology course, including those not 

already taken from the above lists, which must be at 

the 200-level or above 3 

Capstone Requirement 3 

Students must complete an honors thesis (SOCI 485), 

Seminar: Critical Issues in Sociology (SOCI 486), a research 

project (SOCI 497) or a three-credit internship (SOCI 498). 

Total minimum credits: 39 

EDUCATION CONCENTRATION 



Required Courses Credits 

SOC1 102 Introduction to Sociology 3 

SOCI 290 Seminar: Social Theory 3 

SOCI 305 Sociology of Education 3 

SOCI 332 Sociology of Organizations 3 

SOCI 370 Sociological Analysis (Writing Intensive in the Major 

Core Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) 3 

SOCI 390 Seminar: Research Methods in Sociology 3 

SOCI 391 Seminar: Social Data Analysis 3 

One course from among the following 3 

SOCI 322 Sociology of Childhood 

SOCI 323 Sociology of Adolescence 
One course from among the following 3 

SOCI 204 Gender, Sexuality and Society 

SOCI 207 Social Inequality 

SOCI 312 Discrimination and Prejudice 

SOCI 315 Race and Ethnicity America 

SOCI 330 Women's Roles: Sociology of Sex and Gender 
Plus two additional sociology course, including those not 

already taken from the above lists, one of which must 

be at the 200 level or above 6 



Capstone Requirement 3 

Students must complete a research project (SOCI 497), Honors 
Thesis (SOCI 485), or a three-credit internship (SOCI 498). 

Total minimum credits: 36 
GLOBAL STUDIES CONCENTRATION 



Required Courses 

SOC1 102 Introduction to Sociology 
SOC1 104 Global Social Problems.... 
SOCI 290 Seminar: Social Theory.... 
SOCI 342 Comparative Sociology 



Credits 

3 

3 

3 

3 



SOCI 370 Sociological Analysis (Writing Intensive in the Major 

Core Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) 3 

SOCI 390 Seminar: Research Methods in Sociology 3 

SOCI 391 Seminar: Social Data Analysis 3 

Plus any two courses from the following 6 

SOCI 214 Middle Eastern Societies 

SOCI 217 East Asian Societies: China and Japan 

SOCI 218 Chinese Society and Culture 

SOCI 219 Population and Society 

SOCI 220 The Developing World 

SOCI 353 Cities in a Global Context 
Plus two additional sociology courses, including those not 

already taken from the above lists, which must be at the 

200 level or above 6 

Cognate: One course from the following list 3 

ANTH 208 Anthropology of Women 

COMM 365 Introduction to Intercultural Communication 

GEOG 171 Geography of the Global South 

GEOG 381 Geography of Latin America 

GEOG 388 Geography of Africa 

MUSC 162 Music in African Culture 

PHIL 212 Philosophies of India 

POLI 382 Latin American Government and Politics 

POLI 387 Government and Politics of Africa 

POLI 488 Politics and Development in the Third World 

THEA 222 Asian Theater 

Capstone Requirement 3 

Students must complete a research project (SOCI 497) or a 
three-credit internship (SOCI 498). 

Total minimum credits: 39 

DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION, EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION OR SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Students may choose a double major in sociology and elemen- 
tary education, early childhood education or special education 
for licensure purposes. Appropriate advising materials with sug- 
gested course sequences are available. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



143 



I 



Sociology ; 



SOCIOLOGY MINOR Credits 

Students must take 18 credits including 

SOCI 102 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Plus any one of the following 3 

SOCI 207 Social Inequality 



SOCI 312 Discrimination and Prejudice 

SOCI 315 Race and Ethnicity in America 

SOCI 326 Social Gerontology - Sociology of Aging 

SOCI 330 Women's Roles: Sociology of Sex and Gender 

Plus any one of the following 3 

SOCI 203 The Family 

SOCI 206 Cities and People: Urban Sociology 
SOCI 332 Sociology of Organizations 
SOCI 340 Sociology of Politics 
SOCI 350 Sociology of Work 
Plus three additional sociology courses, including 
those not already taken from the above lists, 

two of which must be at the 200 level or above 9 

Total minimum credits: 18 



HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in sociology provides highly motivated 
sociology majors with opportunities to enhance their academic 
program through intensive scholarly study and research designed 
to be of assistance in postgraduate employment or in the pursuit 
of an advanced degree. Contact the Department of Sociology for 
further information concerning eligibility and application. 

OVERSEAS STUDY OPPORTUNITIES 

The Department of Sociology urges its majors and minors to 
study abroad, both via Bridgewater State College sponsored 
study tours and as exchange students at universities. The Office 
of International Programs can assist students. Any student con- 
templating study abroad should consult the department with all 
pertinent documentation. Final acceptance of credit will be deter- 
mined upon receipt of official transcripts and supporting material 
and, in some cases, may not be equivalent to the credits earned 
in a regular semester or year at Bridgewater State College. 




144 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Professor Henry Shaffer 

Professors: Arthur Dirks, Stephen Levine, Nancy Moses, 
Suzanne Ramczyk 

Associate Professor: James Quinn 

Assistant Professor: Jody Weber 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.2193 
Location: Rondileau Campus Center, Room 024C 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/theater 

DEGREE PROGRAM 

• BA in Communication Studies 
Concentrations: Dance Education, Theater Arts, 
Theater Education 

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• Dance* 

• Theater Arts 
interdisciplinary minor 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM 

The Department of Theater and Dance is committed to educating 
students in two significant art forms. Upon completing a program 
in theater or dance, students are prepared to engage in theater 
and dance throughout their lives, to pursue advanced study in 
the art forms or to begin a career in theater or dance. 

The theater program emphasizes a comprehensive theater 
program within the liberal arts context. Students pursue a 
systematic course of study in performance, production, manage- 
ment, history, literature and criticism, which are enhanced by 
opportunities to participate in either performance or production 
in the department's theater season. 

The theater education program combines the content of the 
theater program with additional learning to support Standard I 
requirements for licensure to teach theater in public schools 
in Massachusetts. 

The dance program offers a wide variety of dance technique 
training and a solid theoretical foundation for performance and 
choreography. In addition, the program offers an emphasis on 
dance pedagogy in either the private of public sector. The pro- 
gram fulfills Standard I requirements for licensure for dance in 
the public schools in Massachusetts. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

Students majoring in this department may choose one of 
three concentrations: dance education, theater arts or 
theater education. 

Also see the catalog section "Interdisciplinary and 
Preprofessional Programs" and consult the department for infor- 
mation on the interdisciplinary dance minor. 



THEATER ARTS CONCENTRATION 

Students selecting this concentration follow a program designed 
to develop skills in and appreciation of those subjects related to 
performance and production in live theater. 

Required Courses Credits 

THEA 115 Play Production 3 

THEA 211 Voice Production for Theater 3 

THEA 220 Play Analysis for Production 3 

THEA 242 Acting 1 J 

THEA 280 Theater Management 3 

THEA 421 Theater History 1 3 

THEA 422 Theater History II 3 

THEA 431 Directing 1 3 

THEA 495 Seminar in Contemporary Theater 2 

Three credits from the following 3 

THEA 1 57 Movement for the Actor 

THEA 1 74 Technical Theater Production 

THEA 162 Costume Construction 
One of the following 3 

THEA 265 Stage Costuming 

THEA 272 Scenography 

One theater elective (must be 300- or 400-level) 3 

Each of the following practica 3 

THEA 170 Technical Theater Practicum 

THEA 172 Costuming Practicum 

THEA 185 Theater Management Practicum 
One additional practicum from above or 

THEA 140 Performance Practicum 1 

Required cognate (choose one of the following) 3 

ENGL 214 The Classical Tradition 

ENGL 241 Shakespeare 

ENGL 342 Shakespeare: Histories and Comedies 
ENGL 343 Shakespeare: Tragedies and Late Plays 
ENGL 353 Modern European Drama 
ENGL 356 Modern American Drama 

Total minimum credits: 42 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

DANCE EDUCATION AND THEATER 
EDUCATION CONCENTRATIONS 

These concentrations are liberal arts programs within the major 
of communication arts and sciences dealing with the subject 
areas of dance and theater arts. They are designed to meet the 
subject matter knowledge requirements for Massachusetts 
licensure in the fields of dance and theater. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



145 



bSc 



BRIDGE WATE R 
STATE COLLEGE 



Theater and Dance 



Those students in the program who choose to seek initial 
Massachusetts licensure at either the undergraduate or postbac- 
calaureate levels must also complete an additional 24 credits 
in education and gain admittance to the professional educa- 
tion program. Upon successful completion, the student will be 
licensed to teach theater or dance in Massachusetts public schools 
grades PreK-12. 

DANCE EDUCATION CONCENTRATION 

Students must audition for admittance to the dance education 
concentration, and must meet subject matter knowledge on the 
Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL). 

Required Courses Credits 

THEA251 Dance History 3 

THEA 255 Creative Dance 1 3 

THEA 256 Creative Dance II 3 

THEA 260 World Dance 3 

THEA 353 Creative Dance for Children 3 

THEA 357 Dance Production Theory 3 

THEA 358 Dance Production Techniques 1 

THEA 452 Ballet Pedagogy 3 

THEA 453 Dance Methodology 3 

PHED 281 Theory and Practice of Educational Dance 2 

Three credits from the following 3 

THEA 399 Topical Studies 

THEA 497 Advanced Individual Projects 

THEA 498 Internship in Theater 

THEA 499 Directed Study in Theater 
One of the following 3 

THEA 265 Stage Costuming 

THEA 272 Sceneography I 

THEA 280 Theater Management 
Two credits in 2 

THEA 155 Dance Practicum 
One credit in one of the following 1 

THEA 170 Technical Theater Practicum 

THEA 172 Theater Costume Practicum 

THEA 185 Theater Management Practicum 

Cognate Courses 

PHED 161 Folk Dance 1 

PHED 164 Square Dance 1 

PHED 168 Ballroom Dance 1 

PHED 237 Theory and Practice of Jazz Dance, Fall 2 

PHED 242 Theory and Practice of Ballet, Fall 2 

PHED 245 Theory and Practice of Ballet, Spring 2 

PHED 247 Theory and Practice of Jazz Dance, Spring 2 

PHED 248 Theory and Practice of Modern Dance, Fall 2 

PHED 249 Theory and Practice of Modern Dance, Spring 2 

PHED 271 Theory and Practice of Tap Dance 2 

Total minimum credits: 53 

Education Requirements 

Students seeking licensure as Teacher of Dance must declare a 
minor in secondary education (high school, middle school, PreK- 
1 2 specialist) and complete the following courses in the minor. 



Credit 

*EDHM 210 Introduction to Teaching 

EDHM 235 Learning and Motivation 

EDHM 335 Assessment and Planning 

EDHM 445 Content Area Reading, Writing and Study Skills .... 

An appropriate "strategies for teaching" course 

EDHM 490 Teaching Practicum 

PSYC 227 Development through the Life Cycle 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 

* To be completed prior to admission to professional education 
and enrollment in any other education courses. 

Total minimum credits in secondary education minor: 33 
Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

THEATER EDUCATION CONCENTRATION 

Required Courses Credits 

THEA 115 Play Production 3 

THEA 157 Movement for the Stage 3 

THEA 211 Voice Production for Theater 3 

THEA 220 Play Analysis for Production 3 

THEA 226 Children's Theater 3 

THEA 230 Creative Dramatics 3 

THEA 242 Acting 1 3 

THEA 272 Scenography 3 

THEA 280 Theater Management 3 

THEA 326 Children's Theater Tour 3 

THEA 421 Theater History 1 3 

or 

THEA 422 Theater History II 

THEA 430 Playwriting 3 

THEA 431 Directing 3 

One credit each in 3 

THEA 170 Technical Theater Practicum 

THEA 172 Theater Costume Practicum 

THEA 185 Theater Management Practicum 

Cognate Courses 

ENGL 253 Non-Western Literature 3 

ENGL 356 Modern American Drama 3 

One course from the following 3 

ENGL 241 Shakespeare 
ENGL 335 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama 
ENGL 342 Shakespeare: Histories and Comedies 
ENGL 343 Shakespeare: Tragedies and Late Plays 

Total minimum credits 51 



146 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



Theater and Dance 



V 



BSC 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Education Requirements Choose one 1 

I Students seeking licensure as Teacher of Theater must declare a PHED 161 FolkDance 
:. minor in secondary education (high school, middle school, PreK- PHED 164 Square Dance 
12 specialist) and complete the following courses in the minor. PHED 168 Ballroom Dance 

PHED 268 Ballroom Dance II - Theory, Practice 
Credits and Performance 

*EDHM 210 Introduction to Teaching 3 Choose six credits from the following 6 

EDHM 235 Learning and Motivation 3 PHED 237 Theory and Practice of Jazz Dance, Fall 

EDHM 335 Assessment and Planning 3 PHED 242 Theory and Practice of Ballet, Fall 

EDHM 445 Content Area Reading, Writing and Study Skills 3 PHED 245 Theory and Practice of Ballet, Spring 

An appropriate "strategies for teaching" course 3 PHED 247 Theory and Practice of Jazz Dance, Spring 

EDHM 490 Teaching Practicum 12 PHED 248 Theory and Practice of Modern Dance, Fall 

PSYC 227 Development through the Life Cycle 3 PHED 249 Theory and Practice of Modern Dance, Spring 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 3 THEA/PHED 259 Dance Repertory 

; * To be completed prior to admission to professional education PHED 271 Theory and Practice of Tap Dance 

and enrollment in any other education courses. Total minimum credits: 23 

Total minimum credits in secondary education minor: 33 — 

- r . m p amiiromontc DOUBLE MAJOR WITH ELEMENTARY 

Core Curr,^ EDUCATION. EARLY CHILDHOOD 
A minimum of 120 earned hours is required for graduation. cnur atihm Tip CDcriAi cniirATinM 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements tuuv.Ml lura UK SftLlAL CUULAl IUN 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" Students may choose a double major, one in communication arts 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, and sciences Wlth a concentration in theater arts, dance or the- 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation ater education and another in elementary education, early child- 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" hood education or special education for licensure purposes. 

section of this catalog. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

THEATER ARTS MINOR Credits The honors program in theater arts provides highly motivated 

THEA 1 1 5 Play Production 3 communication studies and theater arts majors with opportuni- 

THEA 211 Voice Production for Theater 3 t' es t0 enhance their academic program through intensive schol- 

THEA 220 Play Analysis for Production ZZIZZZZ" 3 ar| y stud y and research designed to be of assistance in 

Three elective THEA courses (any THEA course) 9 postgraduate employment or in the pursuit of an advanced 

Practica (two credits in THEA 140 THEA 170) degree in theater and dance. Interested students should contact 

and/or THEA 185) 2 tne Department of Theater and Dance for further information 

concerning eligibility and application. 

Total minimum credits: 20 



ACTIVITIES AND PRODUCTIONS 

INTERDISCIPLINARY MINOR IN DANCE The program of theater and dance presents six mainstage pro- 

The dance minor is an interdisciplinary program in the theater ductions annually in the 1 400-seat Rondileau Campus Center 

arts and dance and the physical education program. The objec- auditorium. The productions usually include a play, a musical, an 

tive is to give a solid liberal arts experience in the art of dance. experimental work, a production for young audiences and two 

The program includes the study of techniques of various styles of dance concerts. Any interested student is invited to participate. 

dance, dance history and theory, choreography and production. Several student clubs are actively engaged in cocurricular 

L . - ..^ activities supportive of the academic programs in the 

Required Courses Credits department KK 

lul !!S lei n 8nCe u raCt ' CUm (tW ° semesters) I The Ensemble Theater sponsors and produces student-direct- 

tuc a /Ducn ill r 6 n tory -; • I ed studio productions, workshops, and social and educational 

rnr * innrS Irl ^ reatlve P ance ; 1 activities. It is open to all students interested in theater. 

THEA/PHED 256 Creative Dance II 3 TL nr ^ ^ p _ 

THEA/PHED 357 Dance Production Theory 2 ^ sc Dance Com P an V ,s °Pf t0 alL J brm 9 s a P rofes " 

THEA/PHED 358 Dance Production Techniques 1 sic \ nal dance C0 ^ an V |° ? m P us for a br,ef residence P ro / am , 

PHED 1 54 Ballet 2 concert each year. It also sponsors master classes and social 

and educational activities dealing with dance. 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



147 



Theater and Dance 



s 



BSC 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Students may also receive academic credit in the department 
for active participation in choral, speaking, dance or theater 
- see course descriptions for more information on the following 
courses: 

THEA 140 Theater Performance Practicum 
THBA/PHED 1 55 Dance Practicum 
THEA 1 70 Technical Theater Practicum 
THEA 1 72 Theater Costume Practicum 
THEA 185 Theater Management Practicum 

Note: A maximum of six credits in the above courses may be 
applied toward graduation. 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 

SPEECH COMMUNICATION AND THEATER 

This program is inactive. 



148 



SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



School of Business 



BSC 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Dr. Catherine Morgan 
Dean, School of Business 

Mr. Frank Sargent 

Assistant Dean and Director of Aviation, School of Business 



ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS 

Accounting and Finance 

Dr. Edward Braun, Acting Chairperson 

Aviation Science 

Associate Professor Michael Farley, Chairperson 
Economics 

Dr. Margaret Brooks, Chairperson 
Management 

Dr. Robert Wolk, Chairperson 

Location: Harrington Hall, Room 104 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/business 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

The School of Business emphasizes academic rigor and learning 
that bridges theory and practice. Because of our outstanding fac- 
ulty and programs, our students graduate with a firm foundation 
for professional success. 

The programs in the School of Business are accredited by 
the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education 
(IACBE). A specialized accrediting body, lACBE's mission is to pro- 
mote and support quality business education worldwide through 
accreditation and outcomes assessment. 

The structured major in accounting and finance offers curri- 
cula that prepare students for the rigorous examinations needed 
for professional certification as a Certified Public Accountant 
(CPA), Certified Management Accountant (CMA), Chartered 
Financial Analyst (CFA) or Certified Financial Planner (CFP). 
Bridgewater State College students frequently win statewide 
competitions and are often cited by the Massachusetts Society of 
CPAs for their excellent work. 

The FAA-approved aviation science major is unique among 
public four-year institutions on the eastern seaboard of the 
United States and attracts numerous students from outside 
Massachusetts. The flight training concentration takes a student 
through commercial licensing and flight instructor certification. 
The aviation management concentration includes private pilot 
licensing and prepares students for careers with airlines, airports, 
aircraft companies, government agencies and other aviation 
support services. 

The bachelor of science program in economics prepares stu- 
dents to understand and apply the fundamentals of economic 
theory and analysis in today's global market economy. The curric- 
ulum guides economics majors in developing creative, analytical, 
and critical thinking skills and sound problem-solving techniques, 
qualities that are highly valued in any professional field. Students 
in the program have the opportunity to participate in internships 
and pursue careers with banks, corporations, government organi- 
zations, real estate firms and stock brokerages. 



The Department of Management offers undergraduate pro- 
grams that prepare students for successful careers in business 
and management. 

The undergraduate management major includes concen- 
trations in general management, energy and environmental 
resources management, global management, information 
systems management, marketing, operations management and 
transportation. Experiential courses and internships give students 
the opportunity to work on projects with local companies 
and businesses. 

The School of Business supports Bridgewater State College 
in its dual mission to educate the residents of Southeastern 
Massachusetts and the commonwealth, and to be a resource for 
the region and state. We meet our professional responsibilities 
to our students and to the region by bringing members of the 
community into our classrooms, extending classroom learning 
into community settings, and actively engaging in scholarly and 
professional development. 

The School of Business is located in fully renovated, historic, 
Harrington Hall. Students benefit from classrooms with modern 
technology and access to technology labs. 

Qualified students may register for undergraduate and gradu- 
ate certificates in such fields as marketing management, infor- 
mation systems, accounting and finance, including a CPA Exam 
Preparation Certificate, as alternatives to degree programs. The 
school also offers minors in each department and collaborates 
with other departments in offering interdisciplinary minors in 
actuarial science, Canadian studies, public relations and health 
resources management. 

Students with interests in research have the opportunity to 
work on faculty projects that are advancing the state of knowl- 
edge in their disciplines. The themes of leadership, technology 
and internationalization serve as integrating threads that tie 
together all of Bridgewater State College's academic disciplines. 

In addition to undergraduate programs, the School of 
Business offers a Master of Science in Management degree, with 
concentrations in accounting, marketing, organizational develop- 
ment and technology management. Qualified undergraduates 
may be accepted to enroll in the school's five-year Bachelor 
of Science degree in management/Master of Science degree 
in management. 



DEPARTMENTAL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

See the "Course Descriptions" section of this catalog for depart- 
mental course descriptions. 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Accounting and Finance 




FACULTY 

Acting Chairperson: Professor Edward Braun 

Graduate Program Coordinator: 

Professor Carleton Donchess 

Professors: Saul Auslander, Kathleen Sevigny, 
Harold Silverman 

Associate Professors: Patricia Bancroft, Shannon Donovan 

Assistant Professor: Mark Crowley 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1395 
Location: Harrington Hall, Room 103 
Web site, www.bridgew.edu/af 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BS in Accounting and Finance 
Concentrations: Accounting, Finance 

• Master of Science in Management (MS) 
Concentration: Accounting 

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• Accounting and Finance 

• Actuarial Science* 

• Interdisciplinary minor 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ACCOUNTING 
AND FINANCE 

ACCOUNTING CONCENTRATION 

The accounting concentration prepares students for a variety 
of positions leading to management level careers in corporate 
and public accounting, auditing and taxation. This concentra- 
tion also assists in preparing students for the Certified Public 
Accountant (CPA) exam or the Certified Management Accounting 
(CMA) exam. 

Note: The Massachusetts Board of Accountancy is changing the 
educational requirements to sit for the Uniform CPA examination 
in Massachusetts. Accordingly, this may result in changes within 
our accounting curriculum. 

FINANCE CONCENTRATION 

The finance concentration prepares students for positions in 
banking, investments, financial planning, cash management and 
international finance in both public and private institutions. This 
concentration also assists in preparing students for professional 
certifications such as the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) or 
Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA). 



Grade Policy for Accounting and Finance 
Concentrations 

No more than two grades lower than "C-" in a required 
Accounting and Finance course (ACFI prefix) will be applied 
toward fulfillment of the requirements for the accounting and 
finance major. This policy applies to students accepted for 
matriculation as freshmen or as transfer students enrolled for 
the fall 2002 semester or thereafter. Students who receive more 
than two "D's" or "F's" in courses may continue as accounting 
and finance majors but must retake a sufficient number of the 
required courses in which the "D's" or "F's" were earned and 
earn a grade of "C-" or higher, so that no more than a total of 
two "ACFI" prefix required courses, with grades below "C-" 
will be counted towards fulfillment of the requirements in the 
accounting and finance major. 



ACCOUNTING CONCENTRATION 



Credits 

.3 



ACFI 100 Fundamentals of Financial Reporting 

ACFI 200 Financial Accounting 

ACFI 305 Business Law I 

ACFI 340 Intermediate Accounting I 

ACFI 341 Intermediate Accounting II 

ACFI 385 Managerial Finance 

ACFI 406 Business Law II 

ACFI 430 Cost Accounting I 

ACFI 466 Federal Income Taxation I 

ACFI 470 Accounting Information Systems 

ACFI 492 Intermediate Accounting III 

COMP 105 Computers and Their Applications: 

An Introduction 

ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics 

ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics 

ECON 210 Statistics for Economics and Business 

MATH 144 Applied Calculus for Business 

MATH 318 Quantitative Methods for Management 

MGMT 130 Principles of Management 

MGMT 140 Human Resources Management 

MGMT 200 Marketing Principles 

MGMT 490 Strategic Management 

Total minimum credits: 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



FINANCE CONCENTRATION Credits 

ACFI 100 Fundamentals of Financial Reporting 3 

ACFI 200 Financial Accounting 3 

ACFI 305 Business Law 1 3 

ACFI 350 Managerial Accounting 3 



.3 
.3 
.3 
.3 
.3 
.3 
.3 
.3 
.3 
.3 
63 



150 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



Accounting and Finance 



ACFI 385 Managerial Finance 3 

ACFI 406 Business Law II 3 

ACFI 455 International Finance 3 

ACFI 465 Options and Futures Market 3 

ACFI 476 Insurance and Risk Management 3 

ACFI 485 Capital Budgeting 3 

ACFI 486 Real Estate Investment and Finance 3 

ACFI 490 Investments 3 

COMP 105 Computers and Their Applications: 

An Introduction 3 

ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics 3 

ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 

ECON 315 Money and Banking 3 

ECON 210 Statistics for Economics and Business 3 

MATH 144 Applied Calculus for Business 3 

MATH 318 Quantitative Methods for Management 3 

MGMT 130 Principles of Management 3 

MGMT 140 Human Resources Management 3 

MGMT 200 Marketing Principles 3 

MGMT 360 Fundamentals of Information Systems 3 

MGMT 490 Strategic Management 3 



Total minimum credits: 72 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE MINOR 

Students from arts and sciences, education, management or avia- 
tion programs may elect this minor to broaden their background 
and expand their potential in job related areas of their respective 
disciplines. The central purpose of this minor is to provide initial 
exposure to the basic areas of business and the environment of 
the financial world. 



Required Courses 

1 ) Both of the following courses: 

ACF1 100 Fundamentals of Financial Reporting 3 

ACFI 200 Financial Accounting 3 

2) Any two courses from among the following: 

(At least one must be an ACFI course) 6 



ACF1 150 Personal Finance 
ACFI 305 Business Law I 
ACFI 340 Intermediate Accounting I 
ACFI 341 Intermediate Accounting II 
ACFI 350 Managerial Accounting 
ACFI 385 Managerial Finance 
ACFI 498 Internship in Accounting 
COMP 101 Computer Science I 
COMP 105 Computers and Their Applications: 
An Introduction 



ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics 

ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics 

MATH 141 Elements of Calculus I 

MATH 144 Applied Calculus for Business 

MATH 151 Calculus I 

MGMT 130 Principles of Management 

MGMT 498 Internship in Management (No more than three 

credits in internship may be applied to the minor.) 
3) Any two courses from among the following 6 

ACFI 340 Intermediate Accounting I 

ACFI 341 Intermediate Accounting II 

ACFI 406 Business Law II 

ACFI 430 Cost Accounting I 

ACFI 445 Auditing 

ACFI 455 International Finance 

ACFI 460 Advanced Accounting I 

ACFI 465 Options and Futures Markets 

ACFI 466 Federal Income Taxation I 

ACFI 470 Accounting Information Systems 

ACFI 476 Insurance and Risk Management 

ACFI 485 Capital Budgeting 

ACFI 486 Real Estate Investment and Finance 

ACFI 490 Investments 

ACFI 492 Intermediate Accounting III 
NOTE: 

• If ACFI 340 or ACFI 341 are used to satisfy requirement 
2, they cannot be used to satisfy requirement 3. 

• Students who double minor in both Accounting and Finance 
and in Actuarial Science may not apply ACFI 476 or ACFI 490 
toward the minor in Accounting and Finance. 

Total minimum credits: 18 



ACTUARIAL SCIENCE MINOR 

This interdisciplinary minor, drawing from both high-level 
mathematics courses and finance courses, is ideally suited for 
mathematics majors or accounting and finance majors who are 
interested in preparing for the actuarial science exam and in pur- 
suing an actuarial career or a career in a related area. 

Credits 



ACF1 100 Fundamentals of Financial Reporting 3 

ACFI 200 Financial Accounting 3 

ACFI 385 Managerial Finance 3 

MATH 151 Calculus 1 3 

MATH 152 Calculus II 3 

MATH 251 Calculus III 3 

Choose one course from the following 3 

ACFI 476 Insurance and Risk Management 

ACFI 490 Investments 

MATH 403 Probability Theory 



Note: Accounting and finance majors may not choose ACFI 476 
or ACFI 490 to satisfy the minor requirements. Mathematics 
majors may not choose MATH 403 to satisfy the minor 
requirements. 

Total minimum credits: 21 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



151 



Accounting and Finance 



bSc 



BKIIH.milK 
STATE CtHXtCE 



TRANSFER OF CREDIT AFTER ADMISSION 

In order for undergraduates to receive credit for courses taken 
at other accredited institutions, approval must be obtained 
in advance. 

Application forms are available in the Registrar's Office. 
Applications for approval of a course from another institution 
should be accompanied by the appropriate catalog from that 
institution. A minimum grade of "C-" is required for transfer of 
credit. Transcripts of these approved courses must be submitted 
to the Registrar's Office within six weeks after the completion 
of the course. Approval must be obtained prior to registering for 
class. It is the student's responsibility to have official transcripts 
sent directly by the institution to the Registrar's Office. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS PROGRAM IN 
ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE 

The Department of Accounting and Finance offers a departmen 
tal honors program in accounting and finance. This program 
provides an opportunity for well-qualified accounting and 
finance majors to conduct independent research and scholarly 
study in accounting and finance. Contact the Department of 
Accounting and Finance for further information concerning 
eligibility and application 

INTERNSHIP IN ACCOUNTING AND 
FINANCE 

Students interested in earning internship credit should contact 
the Department of Accounting and Finance. 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT 

Successful managers in the 2V [ century must have specialized 
knowledge and skills to meet a variety of changing and growing 
demands in the ever-expanding global marketplace. The Master 
of Science (MS) in Management program prepares students to 
apply systems thinking to managerial problems, direct large-scale 
projects, and lead people and organizations through complex 
change. The program emphasizes the role of information technol- 
ogy in the modern firm and the organizational changes occurring 
as a result. In addition, students gain focused instruction in a 
specific area of interest through one of four three-course 
concentrations: 

• Accounting 

• Marketing 

• Organizational Development 

• Technology Management 



Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2 75 based upon four 
years of work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon work 
completed during the junior and senior years 

• An appropriate score on the GMAT. For more information, 
contact the School of Graduate Studies 

• Two appropriate letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course 
work 

• Working knowledge of computers 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT 

For students who hold a bachelor's degree 

The MS in Management requires 30 credits of graduate course 
work, including a core of five courses, a concentration area 
of three courses, one elective course and a capstone course. 
The program also requires two foundation courses, ACFI 
505 Accounting and Finance for Managers and MGMT 506 
Marketing and Contract Management The foundation courses 
must be taken prior to taking the core or concentration courses 
The foundation course requirements can be satisfied by comple 
tion of approved equivalent undergraduate courses including 
courses in accounting and finance for ACFI 505, and courses 
in marketing and law for MGMT 506. Students concentrating 
in accounting will need additional prerequisites. Accounting 
students may call 508.53 1 . 1 395 or e-mail afdept@bridgew edu 
for information. 

Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 
years of work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon work 
completed during the junior and senior years 

• An appropriate score on the GMAT. For more information, 
contact the School of Graduate Studies 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

• Working knowledge of computers 

Five-year Bachelor of Science/Master of Science 
Degree in Management 

Undergraduate students who have completed at least 30 credit 
hours of course work at Bridgewater State College, have com- 
pleted the undergraduate prerequisites, have taken the GMAT 
examination, and can complete all requirements for their BS or 
BA degree in 30 additional credits may apply for the five-year 
BS/MS program. Those admitted take a mix of undergraduate 
and graduate courses during their fourth and fifth year and 
graduate with both degrees. Admission to this program is selec- 
tive and limited. 



152 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



bSc 



BRIPGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Accounting and Finance 



The Master of Science Degree in Management with a 
Concentration in Accounting 

Candidates for the Master of Science degree in management 
with an accounting concentration must successfully complete the 
following course requirements: 

Management Core Courses Credits 

MGMT 501 Systems Research and Problem Solving 3 

MGMT 526 Project Management 3 

MGMT 576 Organizational Change and Leadership 3 

MGMT 581 Information Resources Management 3 

MGMT 582 Business System Design and Integration 3 

Concentration Area Requirements* 

ACFI 545 Auditing 3 

ACFI 560 Advanced Accounting 3 

Select one course from the following 3 

ACFI 567 Advanced Taxation 

ACFI 593 Financial Statement Analysis and Disclosure 

Elective 

Any approved MS course 3 

Capstone Course 

ACFI 595 Accounting Seminar 3 

* For concentration and capstone requirements in marketing, 
organization development and technology management, see 
the "Department of Management" section of this catalog. 

Internship in Accounting and Finance 

Students interested in earning internship credit should contact 
the Department of Accounting and Finance. 

Total minimum credits: 30 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/dddenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Aviation Science 



BSC 

BRIIXjfcWATF. R 
STATfc tOOEGt 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Associate Professor Michael Farley 

Assistant Professors: Richard Abers, Veronica Cote, 
Michael Sloan 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1779 
Location: Harrington Hall, Room 111B 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/aviation 



DEGREE PROGRAM: 

• BS in Aviation Science 

Concentrations: Aviation Management, Flight Training 



UNDERGRADUATE MINOR 

• Aviation Science 



UNDERGRADUATE 
PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN AVIATION 
SCIENCE 

The Department of Aviation Science offers a BS degree in 
aviation science with concentrations in flight training and avia- 
tion management. Graduates are prepared for entry into the 
aviation industry in productive, professional employment, or 
alternatively, for graduate study. 

Federal Aviation Administration Certification of Bridgewater 
State College, as a Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) Part 141 
ground school, allows students to complete all required ground 
school courses at the college as part of the aviation science 
curriculum. Bridgewater State College is also designated by 
the Federal Aviation Administration as an Aviation Education 
Resource Center. 

The Bridgewater State College aviation science program incor- 
porates single-engine and multi-engine flight simulator training 
into its flight training courses. For complete information on these 
programs, consult with the chairperson of the Department of 
Aviation Science. 



FLIGHT TRAINING CONCENTRATION 

The flight training concentration combines academic studies and 
flight training, in order to prepare graduates for a wide variety 
of positions within the air transportation industry, including gen- 
eral, airline and military aviation 1 . The flight program allows the 
student to obtain private pilot, commercial pilot, instrument pilot 
and flight instructor certificates. 

The curriculum provides the flight training necessary to oper- 
ate in the high-density environment of modern airspace. The 
program emphasizes critical thinking and analytical skills, as well 
as oral and written communication skills. Effective resource man- 
agement, human factors and safety awareness are constantly 
emphasized throughout the curriculum. Complementing the 
intensive flight training is expert classroom instruction and use 



of flight simulators. A career in the flight training concentration 
leads to the development, administration and enforcement of 
safety regulations, including airworthiness and operational stan- 
dards in civil aviation. This program prepares the graduate for a 
career path that starts as a certified flight instructor, and leacJ> to 
positions with airlines and corporate flight departments. 
1 Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) scholarship opportunities 
are available. The ROTC program is designed to give students 
the opportunity to become a military officer while completing 
a bachelor's degree program. See the department chairperson 
for details. 

Credits 



AVSC 100 Private Pilot Flight 3 

AVSC 105 Private Pilot Ground School 6 

AVSC 200 Instrument Flight 4 

AVSC 211 Commercial Pilot Ground School 3 

AVSC 212 Instrument Pilot Ground School 3 

AVSC 300 Commercial Flight :4 

AVSC 303 Flight Instructor Ground School 3 

AVSC 307 Air Carrier Operations 3 

AVSC 310 Aviation Safety 3 

AVSC 320 Aviation Regulatory Process 3 

AVSC 400 Instructional Flight 3 

COMP 105 Computers and Their Applications: 

An Introduction 3 

ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 

GEOG 221 Meteorology 3 

MATH 110 Elementary Statistics I 3 

MATH 141 Elements of Calculus I 3 

MGMT 130 Principles of Management 3 

MGMT 140 Human Resources Management 3 

PHYS 181 Elements of Physics 1 4 

PHYS 183 Aviation Physics 4 

Note: Flight courses involve flight fees. 



Total minimum credits: 67 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



AVIATION MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION 

The aviation management concentration is designed to prepare 
graduates for managerial and supervisory positions throughout 
the air transportation industry. Primary flight training is included, 
along with broad exposure to aviation specific business and 
management courses. This program of study is interdisciplinary 
in nature and prepares the aviation career-oriented student for 
virtually any management career in aviation or aviation-related 
industries. Some of these positions include airport manager, air 
carrier manager and general aviation operations manager. 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



Aviation Science 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Credits 



ACF1 100 Fundamentals of Financial Reporting 3 

AVSC 100 Private Pilot Flight 3 

AVSC 105 Private Pilot Ground School 6 

AVSC 305 Introduction to General Aviation Management 3 

AVSC 307 Air Carrier Operations 3 

AVSC 310 Aviation Safety 3 

AVSC 402 Insurance and Risk Management in Aviation 3 

AVSC 407 Aviation Marketing Management 3 

AVSC 471 Aviation Management 3 

COMP 105 Computers and Their Applications: 

An Introduction 3 

ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 

ENGL 201 Technical Writing I 3 

GEOG 221 Meteorology 3 

MATH 110 Elementary Statistics I 3 

MATH 141 Elements of Calculus I 3 

MGMT 130 Principles of Management 3 

MGMT 140 Human Resources Management 3 

MGMT 360 Business Data Processing 3 

PHYS181 Elements of Physics 1 4 

PHYS 183 Aviation Physics 4 

Note: Flight courses involve flight fees. 

One environmental science course 3 

EASC 194 Environmental Geology 
or 

GEOG 130 Environmental Geography 



Total minimum credits: 68 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

AIRPORT MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION 

This program is inactive. 

AVIATION SCIENCE MINOR 

The aviation science minor is divided into two options: a flight 
option and an aviation management option. 



Flight Option Credits 

AVSC 100 Private Pilot Flight 3 

AVSC 105 Private Pilot Ground School 6 

MGMT 130 Principles of Management 3 

Plus six credits in electives selected from the list below 6 



Total minimum credits (flight option): 18 



Aviation Management Option Credits 

AVSC 305 Introduction to General Aviation Management 3 

MGMT 130 Principles of Management 3 

MGMT 140 Human Resources Management 3 

Plus nine credits in electives selected from the list below 9 

Total minimum credits (aviation management option): 18 

Electives 

AVSC 100 Private Pilot Flight 

AVSC 105 Private Pilot Ground School 

AVSC 200 Instrument Flight 

AVSC 211 Commercial Pilot Ground School 

AVSC 212 Instrument Pilot Ground School 

AVSC 300 Commercial Flight 

AVSC 303 Flight Instructor Ground School 

AVSC 305 Introduction to General Aviation Management 

AVSC 307 Air Carrier Operations 

AVSC 400 Instructional Flight 

AVSC 402 Insurance and Risk Management in Aviation 

AVSC 407 Aviation Marketing Management 

MGMT 140 Human Resources Management 

Note: Flight courses involve flight fees. 



FLIGHT TRAINING AND GROUND SCHOOL 

Students enrolled in the aviation science program must take 
all flight and flight-related courses through Bridgewater State 
College. Ground school courses are conducted by the college 
under Federal Aviation Regulation Part 1 41 , as is the flight 
simulator training, which is required as a part of commercial and 
instrument flight training courses. 



PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 

Students seeking admission to the flight training concentration 
must pass a Class II or better FAA physical examination; a Class 
III FAA physical is required for the aviation management concen- 
tration or any other program involving flight courses. A copy of 
the certification for the appropriate flight physical must be on file 
with the aviation coordinator BEFORE FLIGHT TRAINING BEGINS. 



ACADEMIC CREDIT FOR FLIGHT TRAINING 

The following procedures for granting academic credit for flight 
and flight-related ground school training for both incoming 
freshman students and transfer students are in accord with 
pertinent college policies. These policies are designed to ensure 
academic quality and to maximize safety for the participants in 
the aviation science program. All students requesting academic 
credit from Bridgewater State College for flight and flight- 
related ground school training are subject to these provisions. 
Credit for all other course work will be considered as specified 
in the college catalog under the sections concerning "Transfer 
Admissions" and "Transfer of Credit after Admission." 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Aviation Science 



BRIDGEWA7 ER 

STATE COLLEGE 



Entering Freshmen and Transfer Students 

Freshmen or transfer students entering Bridgewater State 
College may request up to eighteen credits for previous work in 
flight and flight-related ground school training under the 
following provisions: 

• To obtain credit for flight training, the student must: 
a) provide valid documentation* of the flight training 
concerned; b) hold a current, appropriate flight physical 
certificate; and c) pass a flight proficiency test conducted by 
an aviation-science-approved flight instructor. (Additional 
flight training may be required if a student has difficulty 
passing the flight proficiency test.) All costs for the flight 
proficiency test (and any additional flight training) will be 
borne by the applicant. 

• Credit for training in FAA-certified ground schools may be 
obtained by providing valid documentation* of the training 
concerned. 

• Valid documentation includes pertinent log books and other 
certificates, licenses and verification of the training from the 
school(s) concerned. This verification must be in the form of a 
statement that identifies the school, describes the curriculum 
under which the training was taken and specifies the number of 
class hours involved. The statement must be signed by the chief 
flight instructor of the school. Up to full credit may be granted 
for courses from flight schools operating under Federal Aviation 
Regulation (FAR) Part 141 and up to half credit for training from 
schools operating under FAR Part 61 . 

Credit authorized by the above procedure for flight and flight- 
related ground school courses may be applied as follows: 

Students entering the flight training concentration may apply 
up to 1 7 credits and students entering the aviation management 
concentration may apply up to 13 credits toward the academic 
major; any additional authorized flight training credit will be 
designated as free electives. At least 50 percent of the credits in 
any major field (major department) must be earned at Bridgewater 
State College. 

Students entering the aviation science minor may apply nine 
credits toward the minor; any balance may be credited toward 
free electives. 



Authorized flight training credits specified above for the 
major, minor, and free electives may be applied toward the col- 
lege graduation requirement of 120 credits (minimum). 

Note: For additional detailed information on the aviation science 
program, call 508.53 1 . 1 779 or write Chairperson, Department 
of Aviation Science, Bridgewater State College, Bridgewater, 
Massachusetts 02325. 

Upon acceptance into the aviation science program, students 
must obtain a copy of the " Department of Aviation Science 
Policies and Procedures Manual." All students must comply with 
the policies and procedures as set forth in said manual. A copy 
of the policies and procedures manual can be obtained upon 
request through the Department of Aviation Science. 



HONORS PROGRAM 

The honors program in aviation science provides highly moti- 
vated aviation science majors with opportunities to enhance 
their academic program through intensive scholarly study and 
research designed to be of assistance in postgraduate employ- 
ment or in the pursuit of an advanced degree in aviation science. 
Contact the Department of Aviation Science for further informa- 
tion concerning eligibility and application. 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



Economics 




FACULTY 

Chairperson: Professor Margaret Brooks 

Professor: Anthony Cicerone 

Assistant Professors: liter Bakkal, Soma Ghosh, 



Michael Jones, Daniel Lomba, Matthew Parrett 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1716 

Location: Hunt Hall, Room 113 

Web site: www.bridgew.edu/economics 



DEGREE PROGRAM 

• BS in Economics 

UNDERGRADUATE MINOR 

• Economics 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



ECONOMICS MINOR 

The minor in economics offers a basic program that enables stu- 
dents to become familiar with some aspects of the economy and 
provides them with training in economic analysis and problem- 
solving techniques. 

Requirements Credits 

ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics 3 

ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 

ECON 201 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory and Policy 3 

ECON 205 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory and Policy 3 

ECON 210 Statistics for Economics and Business 3 

Plus a minimum of two other economics courses 

at the 300 or 400 level. The two courses, 

MATH 110 Elementary Statistics I and MATH 318 

Quantitative Methods for Management, may 

be substituted for ECON 210 6 

Total minimum credits: 21 



ECONOMICS MAJOR 

The major in economics is a comprehensive program that enables 
students to become familiar with many aspects of the economy 
and provides them with training in economic analysis and 
problem-solving techniques. A strong background in economic 
theory will prepare students for entry into fields such as banking, 
finance, business, politics and real estate. 

Requirements Credits 

ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics 3 

ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 

ECON 201 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory and Policy 3 

ECON 205 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory and Policy 3 

ECON 210 Statistics for Economics and Business 3 

Plus five 300-level or higher economics courses 15 

Total minimum credits: 30 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bndgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



157 



Management 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Associate Professor Robert Wolk 

Graduate Program Coordinator: Professor Helene Fine 

Professors: Jeanne Aurelio, Jon Bryan, Craig Cowles. 
Mercer Fellouris, Sylvia Keyes, Dorothy Mulcahy, 
Frank Sterrett 

Associate Professors: Martin Grossman, Stanley Ross, 

Assistant Professor: Peter Sietins 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1374 
Location: Harrington Hall, Room 110C 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/management 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BS in Management 

Concentrations: General Management, Energy and 
Environmental Resources Management, Global 
Management, Information Systems Management, Marketing, 
Operations Management, Transportation 

• Master of Science in Management (MS) 
Concentrations: Accounting, Marketing, Organization 
Development, Technology Management 

UNDERGRADUATE MINOR 

• Management 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MANAGEMENT 

The management concentrations educate students for success- 
ful careers in business and management. The program provides 
general education, other liberal arts courses and specific man- 
agement education for students with career interests in general 
business, transportation, energy and environmental resources, 
marketing, global management, information systems, human 
resources and operations management. 

With a curriculum embedded in a strong liberal arts frame- 
work, students learn how business decisions relate to society 
- culturally, economically, ethically and socially - while develop- 
ing the skills and knowledge that will enable them to assume 
management responsibilities. 

Students who enroll in the management program can gain 
experience through internships and courses that provide practi- 
cal, on-the-job professional opportunities. These valuable learn- 
ing experiences, coupled with the college's development as a 
regional resource for business and industry, offer students signifi- 
cant contact with business and management leaders. 

Management majors have the flexibility to choose from 
among several concentrations. However, regardless of concentra- 
tion, all management majors take the following courses. 



MANAGEMENT CORE COURSES 

Credits 



ACFI 100 Fundamentals of Financial Reporting 3 

ACFI 305 Business Law I _3 

ACFI 350 Managerial Accounting 3 

ACFI 385 Managerial Finance 3 

ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics 3 

ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 

ECON 210 Statistics for Business and Economics 3 

MATH 144 Applied Calculus for Business 3 

MGMT 130 Principles of Management 3 

MGMT 140 Human Resources Management 3 

MGMT 200 Marketing Principles 3 

MGMT 360 Fundamentals of Information Systems 3 

MGMT 490 Strategic Management 3 



Total minimum core credits: 39 

Grade Requirement 

Students majoring in management must achieve a grade of "C-" 
or better in MGMT 130, MGMT 140 and MGMT 200. 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



GENERAL MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION 



Credits 

Management Core Courses 39 

Concentration requirements taken in addition to the 
management core courses 

COMP 105 Computers and Their Applications: 

An Introduction 3 

MGMT 303 Organizational Behavior 3 

MGMT 304 Leadership and Teams 3 

MGMT 355 International Management 3 

MGMT 426 Service Operations Management 3 

Electives 

Choose two of the following courses 6 



MGMT 340 Contemporary Employee Relations 
MGMT 350 Business Ethics 
MGMT 399 Special Topics in Management 
MGMT 435 Small Business Management 
MGMT 471 Diversity in Organizations 

Total minimum credits: 60 



158 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



Management 



B^C 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL 
RESOURCES MANAGEMENT 
CONCENTRATION Credits 

Management Core Courses 39 

Concentration requirements taken in addition to the 
management core courses 

CHEM 131 Survey of Chemistry 1 4 

CHEM 132 Survey of Chemistry II 3 

CHEM 250 Instrumentation 3 

COMP 105 Computers and Their Applications: 

An Introduction 3 

EASC 100 Physical Geology 4 

EASC 194 Environmental Geology 3 

EASC 240 Hydrology 4 

GEOG 121 Physical Geography 4 

GEOG 332 Management and Preservation of the 

Natural Environment 3 

MATH 3 1 8 Quantitative Methods for Management 3 

MGMT 460 Public Policy and Government 

Regulation in Global Management 3 

PHYS 180 Energy and Its Social Uses 3 

Total minimum credits: 79 



GLOBAL MANAGEMENT 

CONCENTRATION Credits 

Management Core Courses 39 

Concentration requirements taken in addition to the 
management core courses 

ACFI 455 International Finance 3 

COMM 365 Introduction to Intercultural Communication 3 

COMP 105 Computers and Their Applications: 

An Introduction 3 

ECON 321 International Economics 3 

MATH 3 1 8 Quantitative Methods for Management 3 

MGMT 410 International Marketing and 

Physical Distribution 3 

MGMT 460 Public Policy and Government 

Regulation in Global Management 3 

POLI 260 International Relations 3 

Proficiency in four levels of one foreign language 12 

Total minimum credits: 75 



INFORMATION SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT 
CONCENTRATION Credits 

Management Core Courses 39 

Concentration requirements taken in addition to the 
management core course 

COMP 101 Computer Science 1 3 

COMP 102 Computer Science II 3 

COMP 210 COBOL 1 3 

COMP 211 COBOL II 3 

COMP 410 Database Applications 3 

MATH 318 Quantitative Methods for Management 3 

MGMT 445 Information Systems Management 3 



MGMT 450 Current Topipcs in Information Systems 3 

MGMT 480 Systems Analysis and Design 3 

Total minimum credits: 66 



MARKETING CONCENTRATION Credits 

Management Core Courses 39 

Concentration requirements taken in addition to the 
management core courses 3 

MATH 318 Quantitative Methods for Management 3 

MGMT 420 Marketing Research 3 

MGMT 424 Advertising 3 

MGMT 430 Sales Management 3 

MGMT 494 Marketing Management and Strategy 3 

And any one of the following three marketing 

elective courses 3 



MGMT 410 International Marketing and Physical Distribution 

MGMT 415 Retail Management 

MGMT 440 Business to Business Marketing 

Total minimum credits: 60 



OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT 
CONCENTRATION Credits 

Management Core Courses 39 

Concentration requirements taken in addition to the 
management core courses 

COMP 105 Computers and Their Applications: 

An Introduction 3 

MGMT 340 Contemporary Employee Relations 3 

MGMT 426 Service Operations Management 3 

MGMT 427 Production and Operations Management 3 

MGMT 470 Supply Chain Management 3 

MGMT 475 Quality Management 3 

Total minimum credits: 57 



TRANSPORTATION CONCENTRATION Credits 

Management Core Courses 39 

Concentration requirements taken in addition to the 
management core courses 

COMP 105 Computers and Their Applications: 

An Introduction 3 

Any one COMP programming course 3 

EASC 100 Physical Geology 4 

or 

GEOG 121 Physical Geography 4 

GEOG 350 Economic Geography 3 

GEOG 353 Urban Geography 3 

GEOG 365 Geography of Transportation 3 

POLI 279 Introduction to Public Administration 3 

POLI 376 Urban Politics 3 

SOCI 206 Cities and People: Urban Sociology 3 



Total minimum credits: 71 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at wvwv.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/diS that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



159 



Management 



MANAGEMENT MINOR GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Students from liberal arts and other programs may elect this 

minor to broaden their background and expand their potential in 

job-related areas of their respective disciplines. The central pur MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN 

pose of this minor is to provide initial exposure to the basic areas MANAGEMENT 

of business and the environment of the business world. Successful managers in the 2 1 st century must have specialized 

Grade Requirement knowledge and skills to meet a variety of changing and growing 

Students minoring in management who enroll in MGMT 1 30, demands in the ever-expanding global marketplace. The Master 

MGMT 140 and MGMT 200 must achieve a grade of "C ■" or of Science < MS > de 9 ree m management program prepares stu- 

better in these courses dents t0 a PP'y systems thinking to managerial problems, direct 

large-scale projects, and lead people and organizations through 

Required courses* Credits complex change. The program emphasizes the role of information 

ACFI 100 Fundamentals of Financial Reporting 3 technology in the modern firm and the organizational changes 

MGMT 1 30 Principles of Management 3 occurring as a result. In addition, students gain focused instruc- 

MGMT 200 Marketing Principles t' on m a specific area of interest through one of four three-course 

(Prerequisite MGM1130, and ECON W1 or concentrations. 

E CON 102, or consent of department) 3 • Accounting 

Plus three additional electives from any ACFI or MGMT • Marketing 

courses for which prerequisites have been completed. 9 B organization Development 

• One economics course (either ECON 101 Principles of 

Microeconomics or ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics) 1 Technology Management 

may be used toward the completion of these three required Admission Requirements 

electives. 9 a minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 

• Majors in accounting and finance and aviation science years f wor |< r a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon work 
majors with a concentration in aviation management must completed during the junior and senior years 

t3ke !f a ^T^cn MT SE? 3 ™ 6 f 2,? r u °°, leVel ' MOt • An appropriate score on the GMAT. For more information, 
to include MGMT 360 or MGMT 490 to fulfill the elective ^ ^ ^ of Gradyate Styd|es 

requirements. . 

. A . ir , , . Jf • Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

At least one-half of the courses required for the minor must be ^„ . , . 

successfully completed at this college. # 0ff,cial trans ™P ts of a " undergraduate and graduate 

course work 

Total minimum credits: 18 

• Working knowledge of computers 

TRANSFER OF CREDIT AFTER ADMISSION 

In order for undergraduates to receive credit for courses taken 
at other accredited institutions, approval must be obtained 
in advance 

Application forms are available in the Registrar's Office. 
Applications for approval of a course from another institution 
should be accompanied by the appropriate catalog from that 
institution. A minimum of grade "C-" is required for transfer of 
credit. Transcripts of these approved courses must be submitted 
to the Registrar's Office within six weeks after the completion 
of the course. Approval must be obtained prior to registering for 
class. It is the student's responsibility to have official transcripts 
sent directly by the grade-granting institution to the Registrar's 
Office at Bridgewater State College. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The Department of Management offers a departmental honors 
program in management. This program provides an opportunity 
for well qualified management majors to conduct independent 
research and scholarly study in management. Contact the 
Department of Managempnt for further information concerning 
eligibility and application 



MASTER OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN 
MANAGEMENT 

For students who hold a bachelor's degree 

The Master of Science degree in management requires 30 credits 
of graduate course work, including a core of five courses, three 
concentration courses, one elective and one capstone course. 
Students in the technology management concentration, market- 
ing concentration or organizational development concentra- 
tion take MGMT 590 Management Systems Seminar as their 
capstone course. The foundation courses must be taken prior to 
taking the core or concentration courses and may not be used to 
fulfill the 30 credit program requirements. The foundation course 
requirements can be satisfied by completion of approved equiva- 
lent undergraduate courses: courses in accounting and finance 
for ACFI 505, and courses in marketing and law for MGMT 506. 
Students concentrating in accounting will need additional pre- 
requisites. Accounting students may call 508-53 1 - 1 395 or e-mail 
afdept@bridgew.edu for information. 



160 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



Management 



bSc 

BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Five-year Bachelor of Science in Management/ Master 
of Science in Management 

Undergraduate students who have completed at least 30 credits 
of course work at Bridgewater State College, have completed the 
undergraduate prerequisites, have taken the GMAT examination, 
and can complete all requirements for their BS or BA degree in 
30 additional credits may apply for the five-year BS/MS program. 
Those admitted take a mix of undergraduate and graduate 
courses during their fourth and fifth year, and graduate with both 
degrees. Admission to this program is selective and limited. 

The Master of Science in Management Curriculum 

Candidates for the MS must successfully complete the following 
course requirements. 

Management Core Courses Credits 

MGMT 501 Systems Research and Problem Solving 3 

MGMT 526 Project Management 3 

MGMT 576 Organizational Change and Leadership 3 

MGMT 581 Information Resources Management 3 

MGMT 582 Business System Design and Integration 3 

Total minimum core credits: 15 
Concentration Area Requirements* 

* For accounting concentration and capstone requirements, see 
the "Department of Accounting and Finance" section of this 
catalog. 

Marketing Concentration Credits 

Management Core Courses 15 

Select three courses from the following 9 

MGMT 510 International Marketing 

MGMT 540 Industrial Marketing 

MGMT 554 Issues in Global E-Commerce 

MGMT 594 Marketing Management and Strategy 

One elective: Any approved (ACFI or MGMT) MS course 3 

Capstone Course 

MGMT 590 Management Systems Seminar 3 

Total minimum credits (marketing): 30 



Organization Development Concentration Credits 

Management Core Courses 15 

MGMT 572 Interpersonal and Group Behavior 3 

MGMT 578 Organizational Development 3 

Select one course from the following 3 

MGMT 571 Organizational Culture and Workforce Diversity 
MGMT 577 Power and Influence in Organizations 

One elective: Any approved (ACFI or MGMT) MS course 3 

Capstone Course 

MGMT 590 Management Systems Seminar 3 

Total minimum credits (organization development): 30 

Technology Management Concentration Credits 

Management Core Courses 15 

Select three courses from the following 9 

MGMT 527 Product Development Processes 

MGMT 528 Quality and Risk Management 

MGMT 561 Environmental Management 

MGMT 562 Strategic Management of 
Technological Innovation 
One elective: Any approved (ACFI or MGMT) 

graduate course 3 

Capstone Course 

MGMT 590 Management Systems Seminar 3 

Total minimum credits (technology management): 30 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



161 



School of Education and Allied Studies 



Counselor Education 

Elementary and Early Childhood 
Education 

Movement Arts, Health Promotion and 
Leisure Studies 

PreK-12 Education 

(For Educators in Non-U.S. Settings) 

Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs 

Special Education and Communication 
Disorders 

Educational Leadership 
Instructional Technology 



I 

Dr. Anna Bradfield 

Dean, School of Education and Allied Studies 

Ms. Mary Ann McKinnon 
Assistant Dean 

Location: Hart Hall, Room 124 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/SoEd 



ACADEMIC DEPARTMENTS 

Counselor Education 

Dr. Michael Kocet, Chairperson 

Elementary and Early Childhood Education 
Dr. Nancy Witherell, Chairperson 

Movement Arts, Health Promotion and Leisure Studies 
Professor Samuel Baumgarten, Chairperson 

Secondary Education and Professional Programs 
Dr. Lynne Yeamans, Chairperson 

Spec/a/ Education and Communication Disorders 
Dr. Robert MacMillan, Chairperson 



ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 

Athletic Training 

Dr. Marcia Anderson, Graduate Program Coordinator 

Counselor Education 

Dr. Michael Kocet, Chairperson 

Educational Leadership 

Dr. Lynne Yeamans, Graduate Program Coordinator 

Elementary and Early Childhood Education 

Dr. John Marvelle, Graduate and Postbaccalaureate 

Program Coordinator 

Health Promotion/Physical Education 

Dr. Karen Richardson, Graduate Program Coordinator 

Instructional Technology 

Dr. Thanh Nguyen, Graduate Program Coordinator 

PreK-12 Education (For Educators in Non-U.S. Settings) 
For information on this program contact the School of 
Graduate Studies 508.531.1300 

Reading 

Dr. Ruth Farrar, Graduate Program Coordinator 
Secondary Education 

Dr. Thomas Brady, Graduate Program Coordinator 
SEAS Core Courses 

Dr. John-Michael Bodi, Graduate Program Coordinator 

Spec/a/ Education and Communication Disorders 

Dr. Kenneth Dobush, Graduate Program Coordinator 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



School of Education and Allied Studies 



The School of Education and Allied Studies offers undergradu- 
ate and graduate programs for the professional preparation of 
early childhood, elementary, special education, middle and high 
school teachers, as well as for specialized positions in school 
and community-based organizations and agencies. All programs 
in the school are devoted to developing professionals who are 
committed to excellence, understand best practices and research 
and work collaboratively in their chosen areas. The school also 
provides service to the schools, community organizations and 
agencies of the region. The school conducts an ongoing review 
of professional standards and requirements in order to respond 
to the changing needs of the profession. Graduates of programs 
leading to initial licensure are ready to enter the profession of 
teaching. During advanced-degree programs leading to the 
professional stage of licensure and other graduate course work, 
educators strengthen their leadership abilities and their commit- 
ment to lifelong learning. 

Extensive field experiences in schools and agencies contribute 
to the development of meaningful linkages between study and 
practice. Procedures and guidelines are implemented to ensure 
that high quality standards are maintained in field-based experi- 
ences and that students have experiences working in settings 
with diverse populations of children and youth. 

Students following the curricula leading to a bachelor of 
science in education degree are prepared as early childhood, 
elementary or special needs teachers. Students majoring in early 
childhood education, elementary education or special education 
must complete an arts and sciences major (for special education 
(5-12), a major taught in grades 5-12), as well as a major in the 
School of Education and Allied Studies. Students majoring in 
most curricula leading to a bachelor of arts or a bachelor of sci- 
ence degree may select a minor in secondary education, which 
prepares them for middle school and/or high school teaching. 
Students majoring in physical education earn a bachelor of sci- 
ence or bachelor of arts degree. 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Majors 

Athletic Training 

Early Childhood Education 

Elementary Education (Concentration in): 

Early Education and Care, PreK-K 

(non-public school licensure) 
Health Education 

Community Health 

School Health 
Physical Education (Concentrations in): 

Coaching 

Exercise Science/Health Fitness 

Motor Development Therapy/Adapted Physical Education 

Recreation 

Recreation and Fitness Club Administration 
(Teacher Licensure available in): 
Teacher Licensure in Physical Education (PreK-8) 
Teacher Licensure in Physical Education (5-12) 



Special Education (Concentration in): 
Communication Disorders 
(Teacher Licensure available in): 

Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8, 5-12) 
Teacher of Students with Severe Disabilities (all levels) 

Minors in 

Coaching 

Communication Disorders 
Dance 

Exercise Physiology 

Health Promotion 

Health Resources Management 

Recreation 

Inclusive Practices in Special Education and 

Communication Disorders 
Professional Practices in Special Education and 

Communication Disorders 
Secondary Education minor (High School, Middle School 

Education or PreK-1 2 specialist licenses) with majors, . 

concentrations, or options in: 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Dance (all levels) 

Earth Sciences 

English 

Health/Family and Consumer Sciences (all levels) 

History 

Mathematics 

Music (all levels) 

Physics 

Theater (all levels) 

Visual Art (PreK-8 and 5-12) 



POSTBACCALAUREATE, GRADUATE, AND 
POSTMASTER'S PROGRAMS 

Postbaccalaureate programs leading to initial licensure are 
offered in: 

Early Childhood Education 
Elementary Education 

Health/Family and Consumer Sciences (PreK-12) 
Physical Education (PreK-8) (5-12) 
Secondary Education 

(Middle School/High School, PreK-12 Specialist) 
Special Education (Moderate and Severe Disabilities) 

Graduate curricula leading to the master's degree and 
Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) are offered 
in the following fields: 

Master's Programs Consult office of 

Master of Arts in Secondary Education 

Teaching and Professional Programs 

(in conjunction with several of 
the departments in the School 
of Arts and Sciences) 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

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163 



School of Education and Allied Studies 



bSc 



BRIDGE WAT fc R 

STATE COLLEGE 



Master of Education 

Counseling 

Early Childhood 

Educational 
Leadership 

Elementary Education 

Health Promotion 

Instructional Technology 

PreK-12 Education (For 
Educators in Non-U. S.Settings) 

Reading 

Special Education 

Master of Science 

Athletic Training 

Physical Education 

Post Master's Programs 

Certificate of Advanced 
Graduate Study (CAGS 
in Education) 

Concentrations: 
Counseling 

Educational Leadership 
Reading 



Consult office of 

Counselor Education 

Elementary and Early 
Childhood Education 

Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs 

Elementary and Early 
Childhood Education 

Movement Arts, Health 
Promotion and Leisure Studies 

Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs 

School of Graduate Studies 

Elementary and Early 
Childhood Education 

Special Education and 
Communication Disorders 

Consult office of 

Movement Arts, Health 
Promotion and Leisure Studies 

Movement Arts, Health 
Promotion and Leisure Studies 

Consult office of 



Counselor Education 

Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs 

Elementary and Early 
Childhood Education 



LICENSURE OF EDUCATIONAL 
PERSONNEL 1 

All candidates seeking Massachusetts Educator Licensure are 
advised to check with their individual education departments 
or the School of Education and Allied Studies offices regarding 
regulation changes that may have an impact on their licensure 
program. 

The School of Education and Allied Studies, through its depart- 
ments and committees, offers the following state-approved 
programs leading to Massachusetts licensure and eligibility 
for licensure in participatory states and territories through the 
Interstate Certification Contract. Information on undergraduate 
and graduate programs leading to licensure is found in appropri- 
ate departmental sections. 

Educator Licensure Programs 

Administrator of Special Education (all levels) 

Early Childhood Teacher of Students with or without Disabilities 

(PreK-2) 
Elementary (1-6) 

Instructional Technology (all levels) 
Reading Specialist (all levels) 

School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor (all levels) 

School Business Administrator (all levels) 

School Guidance Counselor (PreK-8) 

School Guidance Counselor (5-12) 

School Principal/Assistant Principal (PreK-6) 

School Principal/Assistant Principal (5-8) 

School Principal/Assistant Principal (9-12) 

Superintendent/Assistant Superintendent (all levels) 

Supervisor/Director (all levels) 

Teacher of Biology (5-8) 

Teacher of Biology (8-12) 

Teacher of Chemistry (5-8) 

Teacher of Chemistry (8-12) 

Teacher of Dance (all levels) 

Teacher of Earth Science (5-8) 

Teacher of Earth Science (8-12) 

Teacher of English (5-8) 

Teacher of English (8-12) 

Teacher of Health/Family and Consumer Sciences (all levels) 

Teacher of History (5-8) 

Teacher of History (8-12) 

Teacher of Mathematics (5-8) 

Teacher of Mathematics (8-12) 

Teacher of Music (all levels) 

Teacher of Physical Education (PreK-8) 

Teacher of Physical Education (5-12) 

Teacher of Physics (5-8) 

Teacher of Physics (8-12) 

Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8) 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



School of Education and Allied Studies 



Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities (5-12) 
Teacher of Students with Severe Disabilities (all levels) 
Teacher of Theater (all levels) 
Teacher of Visual Art (PreK-8) 
Teacher of Visual Art (5-12) 

Students who wish to be elementary, early childhood or 
special education teachers are required to select a major in 
elementary, early childhood or special education and a major 
in the liberal arts or sciences. All teachers licensed by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts are required to have a major 
in the liberal arts or sciences. 

The following majors meet the arts and sciences requirement 
at Bridgewater State College: 

Anthropology History 
Art Mathematics 
Biology Music 
Chemistry Philosophy 
Chemistry-Geology Physics 
Communication Studies Political Science 
Earth Science Psychology 
Economics Sociology 
English Spanish 
Geography 

Students should consult with both their arts and sciences 
adviser and their education adviser each semester (with a final 
check the semester prior to their last semester) to ensure that all 
licensure and academic degree requirements have been success- 
fully met. 

It is the student's responsibility to ensure that all required 
course work is successfully completed for the core curriculum, 
the liberal arts and sciences major, and the state-approved 
major or minor which leads to licensure. Students must addition- 
ally assume responsibility for submitting all materials to appro- 
priate offices by the established deadlines. 

Note: All candidates seeking Massachusetts Educator 
Licensure are required at the time of application to sign an 
affidavit indicating that they have not been convicted of and are 
not under charges for any crime (misdemeanor or felony) and 
have not been identified by any child protection agency as a 
perpetrator of child abuse. 

Students having questions regarding their licensure and/or 
academic requirements should consult with their adviser, the 
appropriate department chairperson or the graduate program 
coordinator for additional information. 



ADMISSION TO AND RETENTION IN 
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS 
- UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

All undergraduate students preparing for a career in education 
which requires licensure must formally apply, satisfy all selec- 
tion criteria, and be recommended for admission into profes- 
sional education programs in the School of Education and Allied 
Studies. Students may not enroll in education courses beyond the 
introductory level until they have met all admissions criteria and 
are officially admitted to the program. 

Criteria for Admission 

The following criteria have been established as minimum require- 
ments for admission to a professional education program: 

• Candidates must be matriculated into an undergraduate arts 
or sciences degree program (with appropriate undergraduate 
major/equivalent). 

• Candidates must provide proof of having attained a passing 
score on the Communication and Literacy Skills portion of the 
Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL). 

• Candidates must have an overall cumulative grade point 
average of 2.8. This minimum GPA must be maintained 
throughout the professional education program. 

• Candidates must demonstrate proof of proficiency in written 
English (minimum grades of "C+" in ENGL 101 and ENGL 
102 or equivalent). 

• Candidates must provide evidence of early field-based 
experiences working with children or youth in schools or 
other agencies as part of an introduction to education course 
(ECED 230, EDHM 210, ELED 220, SPED 202 or PHED 205). 
The number of hours and placement are determined by 

the department. 

• Candidates must have a complete health record 
(Immunization Record) on file with the Office of 
Health Services. 

• Candidates must interview, if required, with their individual 
education departments (check with department). 

• Candidates must provide two faculty recommendation rat- 
ings of at least "recommend" or "highly recommend" on the 
forms provided with the application packet. 

• Candidates must submit a complete Application for 
Admission to a Professional Education Program. The applica- 
tion includes biographical data, information on employment 
and volunteer experiences, and verification of completion 

of criteria 1-8 above. The application will be reviewed to 
determine competency in written expression of the English 
language and should reflect the candidate's commitment 
to a career in education. Therefore, candidates should pay 
particular attention to correct spelling and the proper use of 
grammar when completing the application. 

Candidates seeking admission to the professional education 
block in elementary or early childhood education should consult 
the "Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education" 
section of this catalog regarding additional admission 
requirements. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



165 



School of Education and Allied Studies 



Note Teacher preparation candidates will be asked to autho- 
rize a Criminal Offender Record Inquiry (CORI) as a requirement 
for access to public and private schools and agencies during their 
prepractica and practica field experience. Also, the Department of 
Elementary and Secondary Education requires all candidates to 
sign an affidavit that states they "have not been convicted of nor 
are currently charged with any crime (misdemeanor or felony)" 
as part of their application for a Massachusetts educator's 
license. 

Admission Deadlines 

Students must apply and be admitted to a professional educa- 
tion program before they may enroll in upper level (beyond the 
introductory level) professional education courses. Students are 
responsible for maintaining communication with their academic 
advisers and for preparing and submitting the completed appli- 
cation packets. Applications are accepted at any time. To ensure 
adequate time for processing, however, application should be 
made several weeks in advance of the anticipated date of regis- 
tration for professional education courses. 

All students enrolling in upper-level courses in the School of 
Education and Allied Studies must have been officially accepted 
into professional education. 

Admission Process 

The following is the established process for admission to 
an initial licensure program in the School of Education and 
Allied Studies: 

• The student receives the application packet from the instruc- 
tor of the introduction to education course (ECED 230, EDHM 
210, ELED 220, SPED 202 or PHED 205) or downloads an 
application from the School of Education and Allied Studies 
Web site www.bridgew.edu/licensurefield placement/. 

• The student completes the application as directed in the 
packet and returns it to the Office of Professional Education. 

• Students will be notified via mail of the status of their 
application. 



ADMISSION TO AND RETENTION IN 
PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS 
- POSTBACCALAUREATE/GRADUATE 
STUDENTS 

All postbaccalaureate teacher education candidates must be 
admitted to a postbaccalaureate program through Graduate 
Admissions (see the "School of Graduate Studies" section of 
this catalog). Candidates must submit evidence of a minimum 
2.8 overall undergraduate grade point average, passing scores 
on appropriate sections of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator 
Licensure* (MTEL), three recommendations and biographical 
information as part of the graduate admission process. 

Note: Teacher preparation candidates will be asked to autho- 
rize a Criminal Offender Record Inquiry (CORI) as a requirement 
for access to public and private schools and agencies during their 
prepractica and practica field experience. Also, the Department of 
Elementary and Secondary Education requires all candidates to 
sign an affidavit that states they "have not been convicted of nor 



are currently charged with any crime (misdemeanor or felony)" 
as part of their application for a Massachusetts educator's 

license. 

Retention and Exit Requirements 

Students must remain in full compliance with all regulations, 
requirements, policies and procedures of the School of 
Education and Allied Studies, the School of Graduate Studies, 
the college and the State Department of Elementary and 
Secondary Education. 

Admission/Retention Appeal Process 

A student who wishes to request reconsideration of a profession- 
al education program admission/retention decision may submit 
a written letter of appeal to the dean of the School of Education 
and Allied Studies. 



APPLICATION FOR PRACTICUM 
-UNDERGRADUATE AND 
POSTBACCALAUREATE PROGRAMS 

Admissions Criteria 

The following criteria must be met for admission to the practicum 
(student teaching): 

• Candidates must be matriculated into an undergraduate arts 
and sciences degree or graduate licensure program 

• Candidates must satisfy all admission criteria for professional 
education programs (MTEL® passing scores, English profi- 
ciency, prepractica hours, health records), and maintain 
continued good standing in the School cf Education and 
Allied Studies. 

• Candidates must have a 2.8 overall cumulative grade point 
average. Middle school and high school teacher candidates 
must also have a 2.8 grade point average in the arts and 
sciences major. 

• Candidates must submit evidence of having passed all three 
parts of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® 
(MTEL), including the appropriate subject tests. 

• Candidates must have successfully completed all prerequisite 
courses and prepractica field experiences. 

• Candidates must obtain departmental approval (via the 
signature of chair or graduate coordinator on their student 
teaching application). 

Admission Deadline 

The deadline for submitting the completed application packet to 
the Field Experience Office is Feb. 1 to student teach the follow- 
ing fall and Sept. 30 to student teach the following spring. 

All practica are completed within the college's service area 
at centers and sites established by the School of Education and 
Allied Studies. Students are supervised by appropriately qualified 
faculty. In that the practica experiences are intense and rigorous, 
it is recommended that students not enroll in other courses dur- 
ing the semester that they student teach. 

Criminal Offender Record Inquires (CORI) are conducted by 
placement sites. An unsatisfactory CORI report is a reason for 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



School of Education and Allied Studies 



BJyC 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



refusal of placement by the Bridgewater State College Office of 
Field Placement and cooperating school districts and agencies. 

Complaints filed by schools or agencies relative to a student 
teacher will be reviewed by a committee from the School of 
Education and Allied Studies. In instances where the student 
teacher has not met the procedures, policies, standards and/or 
expectations of the college as set forth in this catalog, the 
Practicum Handbook and/or other college documents, the student 
may be removed from the assignment and the program. 

The School of Education and Allied Studies is under no obliga- 
tion to make a second placement for a student who has been 
removed from his/her field assignment for cause. 



ADMISSION TO, RETENTION IN AND 
EXIT FROM PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION 
PROGRAMS - MAT, MEd, CAGS 

All graduate students seeking licensure must formally apply, sat- 
isfy all selection criteria and be recommended for admission into 
professional education programs in the School of Education and 
Allied Studies and the School of Graduate Studies. 

The following requirements and criteria for admission to and 
retention in licensure and degree programs in the School of 
Education and Allied Studies and the School of Graduate Studies 
have been established: 

• All students must be formally admitted to a graduate degree 
or licensure program by the School of Graduate Studies. 

• Students must remain in good standing with the School of 
Graduate Studies and the School of Education and Allied 
Studies. 



SUBSTITUTIONS/WAIVERS FOR LICENSURE 

Undergraduate and graduate students with prior courses and/or 
experiences that are equivalent to or exceed those required in 
a particular state approved program may request a substitu- 
tion by way of their academic adviser through their depart- 
ment. Students should contact their adviser for a copy of this 
institutional process. Grades of "D" and "F" cannot be used. 
This procedure is for licensure standards only; consult the major 
department for degree requirements. 



PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REVIEW 
PROCESS 

A student who experiences a problem pertaining to program 
waiver, licensure or other matters may request consideration 
under the School of Education and Allied Studies' established 
review process. 

The first step is for the student to submit a written appeal to 
his or her adviser. If the situation cannot be resolved at this level, 
the student and/or adviser will then proceed to the department 
chairperson or graduate coordinator. Should the student's situa- 
tion not be resolved, then the student may petition the dean of 
the School of Education and Allied Studies for review. The dean, 
at his or her discretion, may convene a review board to hear 
the appeal. 



LICENSURE APPLICATION 

Students wishing to apply for their Massachusetts Department 
of Elementary and Secondary Education initial educator's license 
will obtain application instructions during the educator licen- 
sure/career services meeting scheduled each semester during a 
student's initial internship/practicum. Bridgewater State College 
participates in the Department of Elementary and Secondary 
Education's online Educator Licensure and Recruitment system 
(ELAR). Candidates can access ELAR via the following Web 
address: www.doe.mass.edu/educators/e_license.html. 

BSC program completers seeking licensure through the ELAR 
system must fill out a Request for Recommendation Form and 
submit it to the Office of Professional Education. 

Candidates applying for professional licensure should meet 
with the licensure coordinator in the School of Education and 
Allied Studies during their last semester of course work at the 
college to review requirements and application procedures. 

All candidates seeking Massachusetts Educator Licensure are 
required at the time of application to sign an affidavit indicating 
that they have not been convicted of and are not under charges 
for any crime (misdemeanor or felony) and have not been 
identified by any child protection agency as a perpetrator of 
child abuse. 



LICENSURE TESTS 

Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL) 

The Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary 
Education has contracted with National Evaluation Systems 
(NES) in Amherst, MA, to develop and administer the educator 
licensure test system. Students and interested persons may con- 
tact NES to obtain information regarding upcoming test adminis- 
trations and registration information at 41 3.256.2892 or www. 
MTEL.nesinc.com. Registering, taking and achieving passing 
scores of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL) 
are the students' responsibility and are required for educational 
licensure in the state of Massachusetts. Registration bulletins and 
additional information may also be obtained in the Office of the 
School of Education and Allied Studies reception area. 

Students must provide evidence of having attained a pass- 
ing score (as determined by the Massachusetts Department of 
Elementary and Secondary Education) on the Communication 
and Literacy portion of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator 
Licensure® (MTEL) as part of the admission criteria of the School 
of Education and Allied Studies. 

Students must provide evidence of having attained a pass- 
ing score (as determined by the Massachusetts Department of 
Elementary and Secondary Education) on the appropriate subject 
tests of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL) 
prior to being placed for student teaching. Students are encour- 
aged to consult with their individual departments regarding 
program-specific MTEL® requirements. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



167 



School of Education and Allied Studies 



bSc 



HKIDdl I M I R 
STATE COU-ECiE 



MASTER OF EDUCATION PreK-12 BRIDGEWATER STATE COLLEGE/ 

EDUCATION (FOR EDUCATORS IN UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS - LOWELL 

NON-U. S. SETTINGS) COLLABORATIVE CAGS/EdD PROGRAM 

This program is designed for individuals who wish to earn a A transfer agreement is in place between Bridgewater State 

graduate degree in PreK- 1 2 Education for Educators in Non-U. S. College, which offers the Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study 

Settings. The program is for American citizens who hold under- (CAGS), and the University of Massachusetts-Lowell which offers 

graduate U.S. degrees and are teaching overseas. the Doctor of Education (EdD) degree. 

Admission Requirements ln a«0'dance with Ms agreement, students who safe 

7 , * ,. factonly complete the CAGS program with a concentration in 

• Hold a bachelor s degree from an accredited college educational leadership or reading at Bridgewater State College 

• Have 2.8 grade point average and who apply and are admitted to the EdD program at the 

• Three letters of recommendation; at least two should be University of Massachusetts-Lowell will be eligible to transfer up 
from professors and the third can be from a professional to 1 2 credits from the CAGS program into the doctoral program, 
employer Specific provisions of the transfer credits will be subject to regu- 

• Submit a completed application with statement of intent 'ations described in the Graduate School Catalog of the University 

• Achieve a minimum GPA of 3.0 for the first two degree of Massachusetts-Lowell Graduates of the CAGS program at 

rniirrnr Bridgewater State College will be entitled to the same consider- 
courses r 9 , Zjy . .. , .. 

ations as graduates of the CAGS program at Lowell. Applicants 

Program Requirements Credits to the doctoral program must submit a completed application for 

Education Masters Core Courses 15 credits review °y the Colle 9 e of Education's Admissions and Standards 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 Committee at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell. 

EDMC 531 The Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 3 For additional information about these programs, contact: 

EDMC 532 The Teacher as Leader: From Issues to Advocacy 3 Dr. Lynne Yeamans, graduate program coordinator, Educational 

EDMC 533 The Standards-Based Classroom: Leadership Program, Hart Hall, Room 222, Bridgewater State 

Instruction and Assessment for Diverse Learners 3 College, Bridgewater, MA 02325 

EDMC 538 The Professional Teacher 3 Dr Rutn Farrar graduate program coordinator, Reading Program, 

Elective Courses Hart Hall, Room 133, Bridgewater State College, Bridgewater, 

In collaboration with the non-U. S. setting site, Bridgewater MA 02325 

State College will identify course work that meets the needs 

of the students 15 

Degree requirements include a minimum of 30 approved gradu- 
ate credits and the successful completion of the comprehensive 
examination. 

Total minimum credits: 30 



CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE 
STUDY (CAGS) IN EDUCATION 

The School of Education and Allied Studies offers a program 
leading to a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) in 
Education with concentrations in mental health, counseling, 
school guidance counseling, educational leadership and reading. 
For details, students should consult the counseling, educational 
leadership and reading program sections of this catalog. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Counselor Education 



bSc 



BR1PGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Chairperson and Graduate Program Coordinator: 

Associate Professor Michael Kocet 

Professors: Victoria Bacon, Maxine Rawlins 

Associate Professor: Louise Graham 

Assistant Professors: Theresa Coogan, Melissa Freeburg, 
Christy Lyons 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.2836 

Location: Kelly Gymnasium, Room 104 

Web site: www.bridgew.edu/counselingprograms 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• MEd in Counseling 

Concentrations: Mental Health Counseling, Mental Health 
Counseling-Dual License, School Counseling (PreK-8, 5-12), 
Student Affairs Counseling 

CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE 
STUDY PROGRAMS (CAGS) 

• Mental Health Counseling 

• School Counseling 

POSTMASTER'S LICENSURE PROGRAM 

• School Counseling (PreK-8, 5-12) 

Mission Statement 

The Bridgewater State College graduate Department of 
Counselor Education prepares professional counselors to provide 
counseling, consultation and preventive services to individuals, 
families, groups and communities in mental health, student 
affairs and PreK- 1 2 educational settings. The faculty embrace a 
professional identity as counselors and facilitate the develop- 
ment of this professional identity in students by stressing 
wellness, lifespan development, professional ethics, multicultural 
competencies and prevention. The counseling faculty are 
diverse with regard to background, experience and counseling 
orientation, and prepare counselors to help clients effectively 
respond to developmental, educational, career, mental health 
and other lifespan challenges. As professional counselors, stu- 
dents in the Department of Counselor Education are educated 
to think critically, communicate effectively and responsibly utilize 
innovative strategies to enhance the practice of counseling in the 
21 st century. The faculty facilitate the ability of students to trans- 
late theoretical and philosophical principles into practical appli- 
cation to promote wellness throughout the lifespan. Students 
graduate prepared to pursue licensure in their respective area 
of counseling. 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



COUNSELING PROGRAM OPTIONS 

Master of Education in Counseling Program Options 

Mental Health Counseling - 63 credits 

Mental Health Counseling: Dual License - 66 credits 

School Counseling - 51 credits 

Student Affairs Counseling - 51 credits 

Postmaster's in Counseling Program Options 

Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in Mental Health 
Counseling - 30 credits (minimum) 

Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in School Counseling 
- 30 credits 

General Admission Criteria for the Counseling 
Programs 

The counselor education faculty seek to admit students who will 
become highly effective professional counselors. As such, the 
faculty look at each student's application as a whole and do not 
exclude students based on any one criterion. Students must sub- 
mit a complete application by Oct. 1 for spring semester admis- 
sion and Feb. 1 for summer/fall semester admission. In addition 
to the admission standards set by the college, there are general 
admission criteria for counseling that are based on state and 
national standards outlined below. Specific program admission 
requirements are identified under individual program options on 
the following pages. 

• Each applicant is reviewed by counselor education faculty 
who serve on the Counseling Programs Committee. 

• Each applicant must demonstrate success in forming 
effective interpersonal relationships in individual and small 
group contexts. 

• Each applicant must demonstrate aptitude for graduate-level 
study. 

• Each applicant must provide career goals and objectives and 
their relevance to their chosen program. 

• Each applicant must demonstrate openness to self-examina- 
tion and personal and professional self-development. 

Students are conditionally admitted to one counseling program. 
All students must successfully complete the three core require- 
ments (CNGC 528, CNGC 529, CNGC 500) to be considered 
as a master's candidate. Matriculating students who desire to 
change programs must file a formal petition with the Counseling 
Programs Committee and meet all admission requirements of 
the desired program. A student whose petition is approved must 
adhere to the specific program requirements in place at the time 
of approval. 

The counselor education faculty actively seek to recruit applicants 
with diverse backgrounds. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

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169 



fiSc 



HKIIK.lttMIU 

STATE COUEGE 



Counselor Education 



Counseling Program Planning 

All accepted students must attend an orientation for new stu- 
dents and meet with their faculty adviser upon acceptance. 

Prospective candidates who have not been formally accepted 
into the program are urged to confine their selection of courses 
to the three core courses (CNGC 510, CNGC 528, CNGC 529, 
CNGC 500). 

The Department of Counselor Education takes very seriously 
its responsibility and commitment to train professional and 
ethical counselors and to "protect the public good." Faculty are 
committed to supporting student success, and providing remedial 
interventions, when needed. However, the department also rec- 
ognizes that there will be a small number of students for whom it 
becomes clear that transitioning out of the program is necessary. 
The department has written a Learning Contract that reflects 
ACA ethical standards, college guidelines, department expecta- 
tions and requirements, as well as the procedures that will be 
followed in response to academic, personal and /or professional 
student-related concerns that may arise. During the new student 
orientation experience, the department's Learning Contract will 
be reviewed and discussed with all students; students will sign 
and receive a hard copy of the contract. Students must sign 
and receive a copy of the Learning Contract to continue to take 
courses as degree-seeking students. The contract will also be 
posted on each of the department's program-specific Blackboard 
virtual sites. A signed copy will be put in each student's file at the 
School of Graduate Studies. 

Grade Requirement 

Students must receive a grade of "B-" or higher in each graduate 
course or fieldwork experience; students who receive a grade 
lower than a "B-" must repeat the course. In addition, students 
who receive a grade of "F" in any course will be dismissed from 
the program. Lastly, students must maintain a GPA of 3.0 or they 
will be placed on academic probation as outlined in the graduate 
student handbook. 

Fieldwork Experiences 

Field experiences (e.g., practicum or internship) are required of 
all matriculated students. Depending on the counseling program, 
students complete between 700 and 1000 hours of supervised 
fieldwork experience. Each student, in conjunction with an aca- 
demic adviser, selects an appropriate site and is supervised by 
an on-site professional while meeting with a Bridgewater State 
College faculty member for a fieldwork seminar. Most important, 
students must submit a fieldwork application to the fieldwork 
director to participate in any fieldwork experience. Fieldwork 
applications must be completed by April 1 for the fall and sum- 
mer semesters and by Nov. 1 for the spring semester. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Written comprehensive examinations are administered in 
November and March. The examination, which requires integrat- 
ing theory and practice in the student's matriculated counselor 
education program, is taken during the student's fieldwork 
experience. Previous examinations are on the various counseling 
programs Blackboard sites. 



SCHOOL COUNSELING (51 credit hours) 
Admission Requirements 

• A bachelor's degree in psychology or a related field that 
includes at least two of the following courses: general 
psychology, abnormal psychology and developmental 

psychology 

• A 2.8 undergraduate GPA 

• A composite score of 1000 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• Three letters of recommendation, at least one of which 
should be from a supervisor who has knowledge of the 
applicant's aptitude for the counseling profession and coun- 
seling-related experience 

• Successful experience in a counseling capacity specifically 
related to working with children in an educational setting 

• A passing score on the Communication and Literacy portion 
of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL) 

• All applicants will be required to interview with a faculty 
member 

• A completed application, including a 500-word personal 
statement that presents a synthesized, integrated and self- 
reflective description of the applicant's career goals as they 
relate to school counseling 

School Counselor Licensure 

Course requirements leading to initial licensure by the 
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary 
Education as a school counselor at the pre-kindergarten through 
8 th grade level (PreK-8) or the 5 th through 1 2 th grade level (5- " 
1 2) are outlined below. Licensure by the college will result in 
interstate reciprocity with signatory states as specified under the 
Interstate Certification Compact. To discuss the various licensure 
program options, please consult with your adviser. 

School Counseling Program 

Initial Licensure (PreK-8) (51 Credit Hours) 

Requirements should be taken in the following sequence. 

General Counseling Core Courses Credits 

CNGC 528 Counseling and Development 3 

CNGC 529 Multicultural Counseling 3 

CNGC 500 Research and Evaluation 3 

CNGC 538 Group I: Theory and Process of Group Interaction... 3 
CNGC 520 Group Experience 

(graded on a (P)Pass/(N)No Pass basis) 

CNGC 539 Introduction to Career Counseling 3 

School Counseling Courses 

CNSG 516 Foundations in School Counseling 3 

CNSG 515 Ethical and Legal Issues for the School Counselor .... 3 
CNSG 523 The School Counselor: Psychological 

Development and Clinical Issues 3 

CNSG 524 Applied School Counseling 3 

CNSG 526 Consultation and Collaboration for 

School Counselors 3 



170 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Counselor Education 



School Counseling Fieldwork 

CNSG 570 Advanced Applied Counseling - School 



Counselor: (PreK-8) (100 hours) 3 

CNSG 571 Practicum: School Counselor (PreK-8) 

(600 hours)** 12 

Six credits in electives at the 500 level or above 6 

Comprehensive Examination 

* To be taken within the first 1 5 credits 



** Students will meet with their adviser to plan their fieldwork 
experience. Students will need to complete 600 hours of 
fieldwork in a minimum of two semesters and a maximum of 
four semesters. Students may work 1 0-30 hours per 1 5 week 
semester and will register for three credits for each 1 50 hours 
of fieldwork they will complete that semester. For example, 1 
hours per week/1 50 total hours = three credits; 20 hours per 
week/300 total hours = six credits; 30 hours per week/450 
total hours = nine credits. Students must attend a clinical 
seminar each semester they are involved in field experience. 

Students should consult with their academic adviser when choos- 
ing an appropriate elective. 

Total minimum credits: 51 

School Counseling Program Initial Licensure 
(5-12) (51 credit hours) 

Requirements should be taken in the following sequence. 



General Counseling Core Courses Credits 

CNGC 528 Counseling and Development 3 

CNGC 529 Multicultural Counseling 3 

CNGC 500 Research and Evaluation 3 

CNGC 538 Group I: Theory and Process of Group Interaction ... 3 
CNGC 520 Group Experience 

(graded on a (P)Pass/(N)No Pass basis) 

CNGC 539 Introduction to Career Counseling 3 

School Counseling Core Courses 

CNSG 516 Foundations in School Counseling 3 

CNSG 515 Ethical and Legal Issues for the School Counselor .... 3 
CNSG 523 The School Counselor: Psychological 

Development and Clinical Issues 3 

CNSG 524 Applied School Counseling 3 

CNSG 526 Consultation and Collaboration for 

School Counselors 3 

School Counseling Fieldwork 

CNSG 580 Advanced Applied Counseling - 

School Counselor: (5-12) (100 hours) 3 

CNSG 581 Practicum: School Counselor (5-12) 

(600 hours)** 12 

Six credits in electives at the 500 level or above 6 

Comprehensive Examination 

* To be taken within the first 1 5 credits 



** Students will meet with their adviser to plan their fieldwork 
experience. Students would need to complete 600 hours of 
fieldwork in a minimum of two semesters and a maximum of 
four semesters. Students may work 1 0-30 hours per 1 5-week 
semester and will register for three credits for each 1 50 hours 
of fieldwork they will complete that semester. For example, 1 



hours per week/1 50 total hours = three credits; 20 hours per 
week/300 total hours = six credits; 30 hours per week/450 
total hours = nine credits. Students must attend a clinical 
seminar each semester they are involved in field experience. 

Students should consult with their academic adviser when choos- 
ing an appropriate elective. 

Total minimum credits: 51 



MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING 

(63 credit hours) 

Admission Requirements 

• Bachelor's degree in psychology or a related field, which 
includes general psychology, abnormal psychology and 
developmental psychology 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.8 

• Composite score of 1000 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• Three letters of recommendation, at least one of which 
should be from a supervisor who has knowledge of the 
candidate's aptitude for the counseling profession and coun- 
seling related experience 

• Applicants must have successful volunteer or paid experience 
in a counseling capacity specifically related to mental health 
counseling 

• All applicants will be required to interview with a faculty 
member 

• A completed application, including a 500-word personal 
statement that presents a synthesized, integrated and self- 
reflective description of the applicant's career goals as they 
relate to mental health counseling 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

This 63-credit program is for those seeking licensure as a mental 
health counselor in Massachusetts by the Board of Registration. 
Program requirements have been designed to meet current state 
licensing requirements (CMR 262). 



MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING PROGRAM 

(63 credit hours) Credits 

*CNGC 510 The Counseling Function in School, Agency/ 

Community and Higher Education Settings 3 

*CNGC 528 Counseling and Development 3 

*CNGC 529 Multicultural Counseling 3 

*CNGC 500 Research and Evaluation 3 

CNMH 534 The Professional Counselor: Standards, 

Ethics and Legal Issues 3 

CNGC 535 Applied Counseling: Adolescent-Adult 3 

CNGC 536 Applied Counseling: Pre-Adolescent 3 

CNGC 538 Group I : Theory and Process of Group Interaction ... 3 

CNMH 568 Psychopathology 3 

CNGC 532 Psychological Assessment 3 

CNGC 539 Introduction to Career Counseling 3 

CNMH 564 Theories of Psychological Development 3 

CNGC 520 Group Experience 

(graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis) 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



171 




BR! DOE WAT hR 

STATE COLLit.fc 



Counselor Education 



CNMH 570 Advanced Applied Counseling: 

Mental Health Counselor (100 hours) 3 

CNMH 571 Practicum: Mental Health Counselor 

(Total of 900 hours)** 18 

Six credits of electives at the 500 level or above 6 

Comprehensive Examination 

• To be taken within first 1 5 credits 

• * Students will meet with their adviser to plan their fieldwork 

experience. Students seeking licensure as a Licensed Mental 
Health Counselor (LMHC) must complete a minimum of 900 
hours of fieldwork at a mental health site. Students may work 
1 0-40 hours per 1 5-week semester and will register for three 
credits for each 1 50 hours of fieldwork they will complete that 
semester. For example, 10 hours per week/150 total hours = 
three credits; 20 hours per week/300 total hours = six credits; 
30 hours per week/450 total hours = nine credits; 40 hours 
per week/600 total hours = 1 2 credits. Students must attend 
a clinical seminar each semester they are involved in field 
experience and must attend a minimum of three seminars 
over their 900 total hours/ 18 credits fieldwork experience. 

Total minimum credits: 63 

MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING - DUAL 
LICENSE (66 credit hours) 

Admission Requirements 

• A bachelor's degree in psychology or a related field, which 
includes general psychology, abnormal psychology and 
developmental psychology 

• A 2.8 undergraduate GPA 

• A composite score of 1000 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• A passing score on the communication and literacy portion of 
the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL) 

• Three letters of recommendation, at least one of which 
should be from a supervisor who has knowledge of the 
candidate's aptitude for the counseling profession and coun- 
seling-related experience 

• Applicants must have successful volunteer or paid experience 
in a counseling capacity specifically related to mental health 
counseling 

• All applicants will be required to interview with a faculty 
member 

• A completed application, including a 500-word personal 
statement that presents a synthesized, integrated, and self- 
reflective description of the applicant's career goals as they 
relate to mental health counseling 

This 66-credit program is for those seeking dual licensure 
as a Licensed Mental Health Counselor (LMHC) in the state 
of Massachusetts by the Board of Registration and a School 
Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor License with 
the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. 
Program requirements have been designed to meet current 
state licensing requirements (CMR 262) and initial licensure by 
the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary 
Education as a school adjustment counselor. 



Mental Health Counseling - Dual License Counseling 
Program (66 credit hours) Credits 

*CNGC 510 The Counseling Function in School, 

Agency/Community and Higher Education Settings 3 

*CNGC 528 Counseling and Development 3 

*CNGC 529 Multicultural Counseling 3 

*CNGC 500 Research and Evaluation 3 

CNMH 534 The Professional Counselor: Standards, 

Ethics and Legal Issues 3 

CNGC 535 Applied Counseling: Adolescent-Adult 3 

CNGC 536 Applied Counseling: Pre-Adolescent 3 

CNGC 538 Group I: Theory and Process of Group Interaction . 3 

CNMH 568 Psychopathology 3 

CNGC 563 Psychopharmacology for 

Nonmedical Professionals 3 

CNGC 520 Group Experience 

(graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis) 

CNGC 532 Psychological Assessment 3 

CNGC 539 Introduction to Career Counseling 3 

CNMH 564 Theories of Psychological Development 3 

CNGC 582 Principles and Methods of 

Community Counseling and Consultation 3 

CNMH 580 Advanced Applied Counseling: 

Mental Health Counselor - Dual License (100 hours) 3 

CNMH 571 Internship: Mental Health Counselor 

(Total of 450 hours)** 9 

CNMH 582 Internship: Mental Health Counselor - 

Dual License (Total of 450 hours)** 9 

Three credits of elective at the 500 level or above 3 

Comprehensive Examination 

*To be taken within the first 1 5 credits 

**Students will meet with their adviser to plan their fieldwork 
experience. Students pursuing an LMHC and a license as a 
School Social Worker/School Adjustment Counselor must 
complete a minimum of 450 hours of fieldwork at a mental 
health site and 450 hours at a school-based mental health 
site. Students may work 1 0-40 hours per 1 5-week semester 
and will register for three credits for each 1 50 hours of field 
work they will complete that semester: 10 hours per week/1 50 
total hours = three credits; 20 hours per week/300 total hours 
= six credits; 30 hours per week/450 total hours = nine cred- 
its; 40 hours per week/600 total hours = 1 2 credits. Students 
must attend a clinical seminar each semester they are involved 
in field experience and must attend a minimum of three total 
seminars. 

Total minimum credits: 66 

STUDENT AFFAIRS COUNSELING 

(51 credit hours) 

Admission Requirements 

• A bachelor's degree in psychology or a related field, 
which includes at least one of the following courses: 
general psychology, abnormal psychology and 
developmental psychology 



172 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



b!sc 

BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Counselor Education 



• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.8 clock hours with a total of 600 hours at the site. Students may 

• Composite score of 1 000 on the quantitative and verbal work 1 0-40 hours per 1 5-week semester and will register for 
parts of the GRE General Test three credits for each 1 50 hours of fieldwork they will com- 

. Three letters of recommendation, at least one of which P lete that semester. For example, 1 hours per week/1 50 total 

should be from a supervisor who has knowledge of the hours = three ? edits < 20 hou rs P er week / 300 total hou [ s = 

applicant's aptitude for the higher education/student affairs S L ,X credlts <" 30 h° urs P er w L eek/450 total ^ nine credits <" 40 

profession and related experience hours P er week/600 total hours = 1 2 credits. 

• Successful experience in a counseling capacity or related , Students should consul f witn their academic advisers wnen 
experience in student affairs choos,n g an appropriate elective. 

. All applicants will be required to interview with a faculty ,. S ^ nts . in the student affairs counseling program will not be 

member eligible for licensure. 

• Completed application, including a 500-word personal state- Total minimum credlts: 51 

ment that presents a synthesized, integrated and self-reflec- 

tive description of the applicant's career goals as they relate POSTMASTER'S LICENSURE IN SCHOOL 

to student affairs counseling COUNSELING , 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course The Postmaster's Licensure program is designed for individu- 
work als who seek initial licensure as a school counselor, and who 

This 51 -credit program is designed for those students interested P ossess an a PP lied master's degree in counseling or a related 

in careers in student affairs settings. field ( e -9- social work, clinical psychology), which has included 

a formal, supervised internship experience. Each student plans 

Student Affairs Counseling Program their program of study with a faculty adviser in accordance with 

(51 credit hours) Credits the current BSC requirements for licensure as a school counselor, 

Requirements should be taken in the following sequence. which are aligned with licensure requirements established by 

*CNGC 528 Counseling and Development 3 th f Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary 

*CNGC 529 Multicultural Counseling 3 Education. The program will complement previous master s level 

*CNGC 500 Research and Evaluation 3 course work ' and will include all appropriate field experiences 

CNGC 538 Group I: Theory and Process of Group Interaction ... 3 and a ca P stone experience. 

CNGC 520 Group Experience Admission Requirements for Postmaster's Licensure in 

(graded on a (P) Pass/(N) No Pass basis) School Counseling 

J G A C c 5 c 3 1 9 c lnt ' J odu c n tion , t0 Career Counseling 3 . An |jed master < s d jp counse | ing or re , ated field (Le> 

™™ III ? l Pt Develop u me u nt ^ ° ry m H ' gher EduCat ' 0n - 3 social work, clinical psychology) which includes a formal, 

CNSA 523 Foundations in Higher Education supervised field experience 

for Student Affairs Practice 3 A !, -„ . . "1-. . . 

CNSA 520 Ethical, Legal and Professional Issues * 325 cumulative GPA in the master s program 

in Student Affairs 3 • Three letters of recommendation, at least one of which 

CNSA 525 Student Affairs Administration 3 should De from a supervisor who has knowledge of the 

CNSA 530 Applied Counseling for applicant's aptitude for the counseling profession 

Student Affairs Professionals 3 • Successful experience in a counseling capacity 

CNSA 560 Special Topics in Student Affairs (1-3 credits) • Applicants seeking licensure must complete at least 50 

or any counseling elective 3 percent of the required school counseling course work at BSC 

CNSA 570 Advanced Applied Counseling: Student Affairs as required by the School of Education and Allied Studies and 

Counseling (100 hours; 3 credits) 3 School of Graduate Studies. 

CN / T A 5 ■ 1 l n ^ n u Sh ' p: ?i* dent Affa ' rS Counselor „ • Final applicants will be required to interview with a faculty 

(Total of 600 hours)** 12 member 

Six elective credits at the 500 level or above 6 . ™ 

• A completed application, including a 500-word personal 

Capstone experience choices statement that presents a synthesized, integrated and 

Option A: Comprehensive Examination and Capstone Portfolio self-reflective description of the applicant's career goals as 

Option B: Master's Thesis tne y relate t0 school counseling 

*To be taken within first 1 5 credits • A passing score on the Communication and Literacy portion 

"Students will meet with their adviser to plan their fieldwork of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL) 

experience. Students must complete a minimum of 600 • Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 

fieldwork hours at a site approved by the Counseling course work 

Programs Committee. An internship includes from 1 50-600 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Counselor Education 



i i 



bSc 

BRJ DO B WAT I H 

STATfc COLLfcGfc 



Postmaster's Licensure in School Counseling (PreK-8) 
Program 

Note: 

• Students must complete CNSG 524 Applied School 
Counseling before entering the field experience (a minimum 
grade of "B" is required). 

• Students must complete CNSG 615 Legal and Ethical Issues 
for the School Counselor, which can be taken concurrently 
with either the pre-practicum or practicum experience. 

• Students must complete all required field experience require- 
ments and may not waive the field experience requirement 
based on previous experience. 

Requirements should be taken in the following sequence. 



General Counseling Core Courses Credits 

CNGC 528 Counseling and Development 3 

CNGC 529 Multicultural Counseling 3 

CNGC 500 Research and Evaluation 3 

CNGC 538 Group I: Theory and Process of Group Interaction ... 3 
CNGC 539 Introduction to Career Counseling 3 

School Counseling Core Courses 

CNSG 516 Foundations of School Counseling 3 

CNSG 515 Ethical and Legal Issues for the School Counselor .... 3 
CNSG 523 The School Counselor: Psychological 

Development and Clinical Issues 3 

CNSG 524 Applied School Counseling 3 

CNSG 526 Consultation and Collaboration for 

School Counselors 3 

School Counseling Fieldwork 

CNSG 580 Advanced Applied Counseling - 

School Counselor: (PreK-8) (100 hours) 3 

CNSG 581 Practicum: School Counselor (PreK-8) 

(600 hours)* 12 

Six credits in electives at the 500 level or above 6 



* Students wilfmeet with their adviser to plan their fieldwork 
experience. Students need to complete 600 hours of field- 
work in a minimum of two semesters and a maximum of four 
semesters. Students may work 10-30 hours per 1 5-week 
semester and will register for three credits for each 1 50 hours 
of fieldwork they will complete that semester. For example, 1 
hours per week/1 50 total hours = three credits; 20 hours per 
week/300 total hours = six credits; 30 hours per week/450 
total hours = nine credits. Students must attend a clinical semi- 
nar each semester they are involved in field experience. 

Total minimum credits: 45 

Postmaster's Licensure in School Counseling 
(5-12) Program 

Requirements should be taken in the following sequence. 



General Counseling: Core Courses Credits 

CNGC 528 Counseling and Development 3 

CNGC 529 Multicultural Counseling 3 

CNGC 500 Research and Evaluation 3 

CNGC 538 Group I: Theory and Process of Group Interaction ... 3 
CNGC 539 Introduction to Career Counseling 3 



School Counseling: Core Courses 

CNSG 516 Foundations of School Counseling 3 

CNSG 515 Ethical and Legal Issues for the School Counselor ....3 
CNSG 523 The School Counselor: Psychological 

Development and Clinical Issues 3 

CNSG 524 Applied School Counseling 3 

CNSG 526 Consultation and Collaboration for 

School Counselors 3 

School Counseling Fieldwork 

CNSG 580 Advanced Applied Counseling - 

School Counselor: (5-12) (100 hours) 3 

CNSG 581 Practicum: School Counselor (5-12) 

(600 hours)* 12 



* Students will meet with their adviser to plan their fieldwork 
experience. Students would need to complete 600 hours of 
fieldwork in a minimum of two semesters and a maximum of 
four semesters. Students may work 10-30 hours per 1 5-week 
semester and will register for three credits for each 1 50 hours 
of fieldwork they will complete that semester. For example, 10 
hours per week/ 1 50 total hours = three credits; 20 hours per 
week/300 total hours = six credits; 30 hours per week/450 
total hours = nine credits. Students must attend a clinical semi- 
nar each semester they are involved in field experience. 

Total minimum credit hours: 45 



CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE 
STUDY (CAGS) - MENTAL HEALTH 
COUNSELING (30 credits) 

The CAGS in Mental Health Counseling is designed for students 
who are practicing counselors and do not possess a 60-credit 
master's degree in counseling or related field and need a CAGS 
to apply for licensure in Massachusetts as a Mental Health 
Counselor (CMR 262). 

Admission Requirements 

• A master's degree in counseling, which included an applied 
counseling internship with clinical supervision 

• A 3.25 cumulative GPA in the master's program 

• Three letters of recommendation at least one of which should 
be from a supervisor who has knowledge of the applicant's 
counseling activities 

• Successful experience in a counseling capacity demonstrated 
by at least one year of full-time employment as a counselor 

• Final applicants will be required to interview with a faculty 
member 

• A completed application including a 500-word personal 
statement that presents a synthesized, integrated and self- 
reflective description of the applicant's career goals as they 
relate to mental health counseling 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

Students accepted in the CAGS in Mental Health Counseling 
program will meet with a faculty adviser and design a pro- 
gram based on the current requirements for licensure in 
Massachusetts. The program will complement previous master's 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Counselor Education 



bSc 



BR1DGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



level course work but must include an internship and a compre- 
hensive examination. The program requires a minimum of 30 
graduate credits. 

CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE 
STUDY (CAGS) IN MENTAL HEALTH 
COUNSELING PROGRAM (30 credits) 

Credits 

*CNGC 510 The Counseling Function in School, 

Agency/Community and Higher Education Settings 3 

*CNGC 528 Counseling and Development 3 

*CNGC 529 Multicultural Counseling 3 

*CNGC 500 Research and Evaluation 3 

' CNMH 534 The Professional Counselor: Standards, 

Ethics and Legal Issues 3 

CNGC 535 Applied Counseling: Adolescent-Adult 3 

CNGC 536 Applied Counseling: Pre-Adolescent 3 

CNGC 538 Group I: Theory and Process of 

Group Interaction 3 

CNMH 568 Psychopathology 3 

CNGC 532 Psychological Assessment 3 

CNGC 539 Introduction to Career Counseling 3 

CNMH 564 Theories of Psychological Development 3 

CNMH 570 Advanced Applied Counseling: Mental 

Health Counselor (100 hours) 3 

CNMH 671 CAGS Internship: Mental Health Counselor 

(600 hours)** 12 

Elective: Three credits at the 500 level or above 3 

*To be taken within first 1 5 credits 

** Students will meet with their adviser to plan their fieldwork 
experience. Students may work 1 0-30 hours per 1 5-week 
semester and will register for three credits for each 1 50 
hours of field work they will complete that semester. For 
example, 10 hours per week/1 50 total hours = three credits; 
20 hours per week/300 total hours = six credits; 30 hours per 
week/450 total hours = nine credits. Students must attend a 
clinical seminar each semester they are involved in field expe- 
rience and must attend a minimum of two total seminars. 

Total minimum credits: 30 

CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE 
STUDY (CAGS) - SCHOOL COUNSELING 

(30 credits) 

The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in School Counseling 
program is for licensed school counselors seeking to enhance 
their expertise through professional development. 

Admission Requirements 

• A master's degree in counseling 

• An initial or professional license as a school counselor 

• Three letters of recommendation at least one from a supervi- 
sor who has knowledge of the applicant's professional expe- 
rience as a school counselor 



• All applicants will be required to interview with a faculty 
member 

• A completed application, including a 500-word personal 
statement that explains how this CAGS program will contrib- 
ute to the candidate's professional development as a school 
counselor 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

Note: Interested professionals must submit a completed counsel- 
ing program application by Oct. 1 for spring semester admission 
or Feb 1 for summer/fall semester admission. 

Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary 
Education licensed educators, administrators and professional 
support personnel are required to renew their professional 
(formerly "standard") stage licenses every five years. Individuals 
must engage in sustained professional development that 
strengthens their professional knowledge and skills as part of the 
recertification process. Licensed school counselors need between 
1 20 and 1 50 professional development points (PDPs) to renew 
their primary licenses. Under the revised recertification regula- 
tions, one graduate credit is the equivalent of 22.5 PDPs. 

CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE 
STUDY (CAGS) IN SCHOOL COUNSELING 
PROGRAM (30 credits) Credits 

CNSG 605 Orientation to Capstone Experience 1 

CNGC 610 Counselor Supervision: Principles and Practice 3 

CNSG 615 Legal and Ethical Issues for the School Counselor 3 

CNGC 620 Multicultural Counseling II 3 

CNGC 625 Enhancing Counseling and Prevention 

through Technology 3 

CNGC 542 Group II: The Facilitation of Group Experience 3 

CNGC 630 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology 3 

CNSG 607 Capstone Experience 2 

Counseling electives to equal nine credits 9 

(Electives will be determined during the orientation course) 

Electives 

CNGC 529 Multicultural Counseling 

CNGC 536 Applied Counseling: Pre-Adolescent 

CNGC 538 Group I: Theory and Process of Group Interaction 

(satisfies prerequisite to CNGC 542 Group II: • 

The Facilitation of the Group Experience) 
CNGC 539 Introduction to Career Counseling 
CNGC 544 Introduction to Reality Therapy 
CNGC 561 Grief Counseling 

CNGC 563 Psychopharmacology for Nonmedical Professionals 

CNGC 567 Marital and Family Therapy 

CNGC 582 Principles and Methods of Community Counseling 
and Consultation (satisfies prerequisite to CNGC 625 
Enhancing Counseling and Prevention through Technology) 

CNGC 660 Special Topics in Counseling 

CNMH 564 Theories of Psychopathological Development 

CNSA 551 Student Development Theory in Higher Education 

CNSG 523 The School Counselor: Psychological Development 
and Clinical Issues 

Total minimum credits: 30 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



175 



Elementary and 

Early Childhood Education 



bSc 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Professor Nancy Witherell 

Graduate Program Coordinators: 

Professor Ruth Farrar (Reading), 

Professor John Marvelle (Elementary and Early 

Childhood Education) 

Professors: Steven Greenberg, Gregory Nelson, Mary Shorey, 
Gerald Thornell, 

Associate Professors: Elaine Bukowiecki, Robert Sylvester 

Assistant Professor: Patricia Emmons 

Instructor: Nicole Glen 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1243 

Location: Hart Hall, Room 130 

Web site: www.bridgew.edu/elemed 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BSE in Elementary Education 

• BSE in Early Childhood Education 
Concentration: Early Education and Care (PreK-K) 
(Non-Public School Licensure) 

• BSE in Elementary Education/MEd Special Education 
(Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities PreK-8) Dual 
Licensure 



MEd 
MEd 
MEd 
MEd 
MEd 
MEd 
MEd 



n Elementary Education (Initial Licensure) 

n Elementary Education (Professional Licensure) 

n Elementary Education (Non-Licensure) 

n Early Childhood Education (Initial Licensure) 

n Early Childhood Education (Professional Licensure) 

n Early Childhood Education (Non-Licensure) 

n Reading 



CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE 
STUDY PROGRAM (CAGS) 

• Reading 

POSTBACCALAUREATE LICENSURE 
PROGRAMS 

• Early Childhood Teacher of Students With or Without 
Disabilities (PreK-2) (Initial Licensure) 

• Elementary Education (Initial Licensure) 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (1-6) 

Students who wish to be elementary teachers are required to 
select a major in elementary education as well as a major in the 
liberal arts or sciences. A major in liberal arts or sciences is a 
requirement of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

Students must apply for admission and be accepted into pro- 
fessional education after completion of ELED 220 Introduction 
to Elementary Education and before the professional semester. 
ELED 220 is the only required education course in which students 
can enroll prior to official acceptance into a professional 
education program. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts requires three 
Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure^ (MTEL) for 
Elementary licensure: Communication and Literacy, General 
Curriculum (Elementary) and the Foundations of Reading. All 
three of these exams must be passed as a prerequisite to profes- 
sional semester courses 

All matriculated undergraduate elementary education degree- 
seeking students must take the professional semester as a block 
of courses and must register with the department. These courses 
are usually taken the semester prior to student teaching 

All undergraduate students seeking licensure must consult the 
section of this catalog entitled "School of Education and Allied 
Studies" for information pertaining to admission to a profession- 
al education program and the State Regulations for the Licensure 
of Educational Personnel and important institutional deadlines. 

Students must complete 80 hours of prepractica experience. 
A 40-hour experience is attached to the course ELED 220 An 
additional 40 hours is attached to the professional courses 
Undergraduates who are not taking these courses together in a 
professional block must meet with their professor to plan appro- 
priate prepractica experiences 

After completing all education methods courses, students 
must complete a full-time, semester-long student teaching expe- 
rience in a local school under the joint supervision of a college 
supervisor and a supervising practitioner. 

Students successfully completing the program are eligible to 
apply for initial Massachusetts licensure in elementary education 
(1-6). 

This program has been approved by the Massachusetts 
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and 
includes licensure reciprocity with signatory states under the 
Interstate Certification Compact. 

The following courses are required to complete the elementary 
education major. 

Credits 

ENGL 254 Literature for Elementary Education Majors 3 

GEOG 151 Human Geography 3 

HIST 131 World History to 1500 3 

HIST 221 United States History and Constitutions to 1865 3 



176 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



bSc 



BRIPGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Elementary and 

Early Childhood Education 



MATH 107 Principles of Mathematics 1 3 

POL1 172 Introduction to American Government 3 

ELED 120 Child Study in the Early Childhood and 

Elementary Education Classroom 3 

or 

PSYC 224 Child Psychology 

Note: Some of the required courses listed above also fulfill 
certain Core Curriculum Requirements. 

*ELED 220 Introduction to Elementary Education 3 

ELED 300 Elementary Art Methods 5 

ELED 310 Teaching Science and Social Studies 

in the Elementary School 3 

ELED 330 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School 3 

ELED 340 Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary 

School (Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 

Requirement-CWRM) 3 

ELED 350 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School 3 

ELED 360 Teaching in a Standards-Based, 

Inclusive Elementary Classroom 3 

ELED 492 Supervised Teaching in Public Schools: 

Elementary 12 

Total minimum credits: 51.5 
* To be completed prior to admission to professional education 
and enrollment in upper-division education courses. 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

BSE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION /M Ed 
SPECIAL EDUCATION (TEACHER OF 
STUDENTS WITH MODERATE DISABILITIES 
PreK-8) DUAL LICENSURE 5-YEAR 
PROGRAM 

The dual license program is a joint program between the 
Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 
and the Department of Special Education and Communication 
Disorders. 

The dual license program is a five-year, 1 57-credit program 
that leads to both a BSE in elementary education with initial 
license in elementary education and an MEd in special education 
with endorsement for initial license as a teacher of students with 
moderate disabilities (PreK-8). 

The purpose of the program is to develop special education 
teachers who have an in-depth understanding of special educa- 
tion and the elementary school classroom. 

Undergraduate Program Requirements 

Students must complete a liberal arts or science major. 

The following courses are required to complete the elementary 
education major. 



Cognate Requirements Credits 

ENGL 254 Literature for Elementary Education Majors 3 

GEOG 151 Human Geography 3 

HIST 131 World History to 1500 3 

HIST 221 United States History and Constitutions to 1865 3 

MATH 107 Principles of Mathematics 1 3 

POL1 172 Introduction to American Government 3 

ELED 120 Child Study in the Early Childhood and 

Elementary Education Classroom 3 

or 

PSYC 224 Child Psychology 

Note: Some of the required courses listed above also fulfill cer- 
tain core curriculum requirements. 

Additional undergraduate program requirements 

*SPED 202 Introduction to Special Education 3 

ELED 310 Teaching Science and Social Studies in 

the Elementary School 3 

ELED 330 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School 3 

ELED 340 Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary 

School (Writing Intensive in the Major Core 

Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) 3 

ELED 350 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School 3 

ELED 360 Teaching in a Standards-Based, Inclusive 

Elementary Classroom 3 

or 

SPED 2 1 7 Meeting the Needs of All Learners 

ELED 492 Supervised Teaching in Public Schools: 

Elementary 6 

SPED 404 Student Teaching Practicum: 

Inclusion Program (PreK-8) 6 

*To be completed prior to admission to professional education 
and enrollment in upper-division education courses. 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

Graduate Program Requirements 

Students must complete the following courses. 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

SPED 501 Professional Practices in Special Education 3 

SPED 504 Applied Curriculum Development for 

Learners with Special Needs: PreK-8 3 

SPED 517 Language Skills for Special Needs Learners 3 

SPED 518 Reading Strategies in Special Education 3 

SPED 530 Assessment Procedures in Special Education 3 

SPED 550 Seminar in Special Education 3 

SPED 560 Teaching Students with Special Needs 

through Direct/Explicit Instruction 3 

SPED 575 Behavior Interventions in Special Education 3 

SPED 594 Practicum: Modderate Disabilities (PreK-8) 6 or 12 

Total minimum credits: 84 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



177 



Elementary and 

Early Childhood Education 



EARLY CHILDHOOD TEACHER OF STUDENTS 
WITH OR WITHOUT DISABILITIES 
(PreK-2) (DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
PUBLIC SCHOOL LICENSURE) 

Students who wish to be early childhood teachers are required to 
select a major in early childhood education as well as a major in 
the liberal arts or sciences. A major in liberal arts or sciences is a 
requirement of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

The Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 
offers a major in early childhood education for public school 
licensure, which enables the student to prepare for career 
opportunities with young children from infancy through age 8. 
Students are provided with professional preparation in under- 
standing stages of child growth and development, curriculum 
planning, teaching procedures and program evaluation. 

Students seeking public school licensure must apply for 
admission and be accepted into professional education after 
completion of ECED 230 and before the professional semester. 
ECED 230 must be taken prior to official acceptance into a pro- 
fessional education program. 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts requires three 
Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure'* (MTEL) for Early 
Childhood PreK-K (public school) licensure: Communication and 
Literacy, Early Childhood and the Foundations of Reading. All 
three of these exams must be passed as a prerequisite to profes- 
sional semester courses. 

All matriculated day students seeking this Early Childhood 
Education degree must take the professional semester as a block 
of courses and must register with the department. These courses 
are usually taken the semester prior to student teaching. Part- 
time students should contact the department concerning special 
scheduling arrangements. 

Students seeking professional licensure should consult the 
section of this catalog entitled "School of Education and Allied 
Studies" for professional education admission and retention 
information and important institutional deadlines. 

Students must complete 80 hours of prepractica experience. 
A 40-hour experience is attached to the course ECED 230, 1 5 
hours at a preschool or kindergarten level and 25 hours at the 
primary level (grades 1 or 2). An additional 40 hours is attached 
to the professional courses. Undergraduates who are not taking 
these courses together in a professional block must meet with 
their professor to plan appropriate prepractica experiences. 

After completing all education professional courses, students 
must complete a full-time, semester-long student teaching expe- 
rience in a local school under the joint supervision of a college 
supervisor and a supervising practitioner. 

Students successfully completing this program will be eligible 
to meet Commonwealth of Massachusetts teacher initial licen- 
sure requirements for the Early Childhood Teacher of Students 
With or Without Disabilities (PreK-2) license. 

The following courses are required to complete the early child- 
hood education major. 



Credits 

•ECED 230 The Basics of Early Childhood Education 3 

ECED 300 Early Childhood Art Methods 5 

ECED 311 Science and Social Studies Inquiry for 

the Young Child 3 

ECED 332 Reading Development for the Young Child 3 

ECED 342 Language Arts for the Young Child 

(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 

Requirememt-CWRM) 3 

ECED 352 Developmental Mathematics for the Young Child .... 3 
ECED 361 Creating an Effective Early 

Childhood Environment 3 

ECED 496 Supervised Teaching in Public Schools: 

Early Childhood 6 

ECED 497 Supervised Teaching in an Integrated 

Early Childhood Setting 6 

Cognate Requirement 

PSYC 224 Child Psychology 3 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 3 

SPED 21 1 The Early Childhood Learner with Special Needs 3 

Total minimum credits: 39.5 
* To be completed prior to admission to professional education 
and enrollment in upper-division education courses. 

EARLY EDUCATION AND CARE (PreK-K) 
CONCENTRATION (DEPARTMENT OF EARLY 
EDUCATION AND CARE CERTIFICATION) 

The Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 
offers a concentration in Early Education and Care (PreK-K), 
which enables students to prepare for career opportunities with 
young children from infancy to age 6. Students are provided with 
professional preparation in understanding the developmental 
stages of very young children, effective curriculum planning, 
teaching methodology and program evaluation. 

The concentration in Early Education and Care (PreK-K) 
requires a 2.5 GPA in the major and does not lead to public 
school licensure. This concentration will meet all current and 
projected requirements of the Department of Early Education and 
Care. This concentration does not require a second major or pass- 
ing the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL), as is 
the case with public school licensure. 

The following courses are required to complete the Early 
Childhood major with a concentration in Early Education and 
Care (PreK-K). 

Required Education Courses Credits 

ECED 230 The Basics of Early Childhood Education 3 

ECED 280 Creative Techniques in Early Childhood 3 

ECPK 320 Language Development and Early Literacy, 

(PreK-K) 3 

ECPK 321 Project-Based, Standards-Rich Learning in Early 

Childhood, PreK-K 3 

ECPK 322 Observation and Assessment in Early Childhood, 

PreK-K 3 



178 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



BRIPGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Elementary and 

Early Childhood Education 



ECPK 323 Managing Positive Environments for Children, 

PreK-K 3 

ECPK 490 Mentored Program Observation, PreK-K 3 

ECPK 491 Mentored Performance Fieldwork I, PreK-K 3 

ECPK 492 Mentored Performance Fieldwork II, PreK-K 

(six credits) 6 

Choose one of the following 3 

COMM 365 Introduction to Intercultural Communication 

PSYC 230 Cross-Cultural Psychology 

SCWK 334 Intervention with Family Systems 

SOCI 203 The Family 

Cognate Requirements 

PSYC 224 Child Psychology 3 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 3 

SPED 21 1 The Early Childhood Learner with Special Needs 3 

Total minimum credits: 42 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

The Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 
offers several programs designed to meet the needs of graduate 
students: postbaccalaureate programs and master's degrees that 
allow students to apply for initial licensure in elementary educa- 
tion (1-6) or early childhood education (PreK-2); and master's 
degree programs that allow students to apply for professional 
licensure. The department also offers a Master of Education 
degree in reading for educators seeking an additional license as 
a teacher specialist (all levels) of reading. In addition, a CAGS in 
reading is available. 

POSTBACCALAUREATE PROGRAM: INITIAL 
LICENSE - ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (1-6) 

This program is designed for persons who have a bachelor's 
degree and seek initial licensure in elementary education (1-6). 
This is a day program only. 

Admission Requirements 

• A liberal arts or science undergraduate major or its equiva- 
lent is required 

• A minimum 2.8 undergraduate GPA is required for admission 
to the program 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course 
work 

This program has been approved by the Massachusetts 
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and 
includes licensure reciprocity with signatory states under the 
Interstate Certification Compact. 



Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 
section of this catalog for information regarding graduate pro- 
gram application procedures and admission standards. 

Students seeking initial licensure should consult the section 
of this catalog titled "School of Education and Allied Studies" for 
professional education admission and retention information and 
institutional deadlines. 

All three MTEL® must be passed as a prerequisite to profes- 
sional semester courses. 

Students must complete 80 hours of prepractica experience. 
A 40-hour experience is attached to the introductory course. An 
additional 40 hours is attached to the professional courses: read- 
ing, language arts, mathematics, and science and social studies. 

All accepted students must enroll under the direction of 
their adviser in GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning, which is 
described under "Graduate Advisers and Program Planning" in 
the "School of Graduate Studies" section of this catalog. 

Students must complete the following courses. 

Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

*ELED 220 Introduction to Elementary Education 3 

ELED 300 Elementary Art Methods 5 

ELED 310 Teaching Science and Social Studies in 

the Elementary School 3 

ELED 330 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School 3 

ELED 340 Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary School.... 3 

ELED 350 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School 3 

ELED 360 Teaching in a Standards-Based, Inclusive 

Elementary Classroom 3 

ELED 492 Supervised Teaching in Public Schools: 

Elementary 12 

Students successfully completing the program are eligible to 
apply for initial Massachusetts licensure in elementary education 
(1-6). 

Total minimum credits: 31.5 

• To be completed prior to admission to professional education 
and enrollment in upper-division education courses. 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION (INITIAL LICENSURE) 

This program is designed for persons who have a bachelor's 
degree and seek initial licensure in elementary education (1-6). 

Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 
section of the catalog for information regarding graduate pro- 
gram application policies and procedures. 

Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.8 based upon four years 
of work 

• A qualifying score on the Communications, Literacy Skills 
and the Elementary Education portions of the Massachusetts 
Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL) 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Elementary and 

Early Childhood Education 



Students seeking initial licensure should consult the section of 
this catalog titled "School of Education and Allied Studies" for 
professional education admission and retention information 
and institutional deadlines Admission to professional education 
includes successful completion of ELED 510 Fundamentals of 
Elementary Education and its 40-hour prepracticum. 

Students must complete 80 hours of prepractica experience A 
40-hour experience is attached to the course ELED 510. An addi 
tional 40 hours is attached to the professional courses: reading, 
language arts, mathematics, science and social studies. 

All accepted students must enroll under the directions of 
their adviser in GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning, which is 
described under "Graduate Advisers and Program Planning" in 
the "School of Graduate Studies" section of this catalog. 

Students must complete the following courses. 

Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 

ELED 510 Fundamentals of Elementary Education 

ELED 51 1 Theory and Practice in Teaching Reading 3 

ELED 512 Theory and Practice in Teaching Language Arts 3 

ELED 513 Mathematical Applications for the Classroom 3 

ELED 514 Exemplary Practice in Science and 

Social Studies Classrooms 3 

ELED 515 Differentiating Instruction: 

Creating Inclusive Classrooms 3 

ELED 592 Practicum: Elementary Education 12 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

Exit Requirement: A student teaching documentation package 
(competency portfolio) 

Total minimum credits: 34 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION (PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE) 

This degree program is designed for persons who hold initial 
licensure in elementary education (grades 1 -6) and are seeking 
professional licensure in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
The program is designed to meet the "appropriate master's 
degree" requirement, which is part of the criteria for professional 
stage licensure as set forth in the most recent MA DESE licensure 
regulations. 

Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 
section of the catalog for information regarding graduate pro- 
gram application policies and procedures. 

Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 
years of work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon 
course work completed in the junior and senior years 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• An initial teaching license with one year full-time teaching 
experience 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 



All accepted students must enroll under the direction of their 
adviser in GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning, which is 
described under "Graduate Advisers and Program Planning" in 
the "School of Graduate Studies" section of this catalog. - 

Program Requirements Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 1 

Core Courses 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

EDMC 531 The Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 3 

EDMC 532 The Teacher as Leader: From Issues to Advocacy 3 

EDMC 533 The Standards-Based Classroom: 

Instruction and Assessment for Diverse Learners 3 

EDMC 538 The Professional Teacher (final program course) 3 

Program Electives 15 

• Elect five graduate courses (400 level U/G or 500 level), 
approved by the program adviser, from arts and science 
disciplines. Alternative courses must be approved by the pro- 
gram coordinator. 

• No more than two courses should be in any one arts and sci- 
ences discipline. 

• Suggested disciplines: art, English, history, mathematics, 
reading and sciences. 

• Course selections must be approved by an adviser. 

Total minimum credits: 31 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION (NON-LICENSURE) 

This degree program is also offered to elementary school teach- 
ers who already hold a standard level or professional license. In 
such cases, it is offered for professional development purposes 
and may be individualized. 

Total minimum credits: 31 

POSTBACCALAUREATE PROGRAM: INITIAL 
LICENSE - EARLY CHILDHOOD: TEACHER 
OF STUDENTS WITH AND WITHOUT 
DISABILITIES (PreK-2) 

This program is designed for persons who have a bachelor's 
degree and seek initial licensure in early childhood education 
(PreK-2). This is a day program only. 

Admission Requirements 

• A liberal arts or science undergraduate major or its 
equivalent 

• A minimum 2.8 undergraduate GPA 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course 
work 

This program has been approved by the Massachusetts 
Department of Elementary and Secondary Education and 
includes licensure reciprocity with signatory states under the 
Interstate Certification Compact. 



180 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



B^C 

BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Elementary and 

Early Childhood Education 



Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 
section of this catalog for information regarding graduate pro- 
gram application procedures and admission standards. 

Students seeking initial licensure should consult the section 
of this catalog titled "School of Education and Allied Studies" for 
professional education admission and retention information and 
important institutional deadlines. 

Students must complete 80 hours of prepractica experience. 
A 40-hour experience is attached to the introductory course. An 
additional 40 hours is attached to the professional courses: read- 
ing, language arts, mathematics and science and social studies. 

All accepted students must enroll under the direction of 
their adviser in GRPP 501 Graduate Program planning, which is 
described under "Graduate Advisers and Program Planning" in 
the "School of Graduate Studies" section of this catalog. 

All three MTEL® must be passed as a prerequisite to profes- 
sional semester courses. 

Students must complete the following courses. Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

*ECED 230 The Basics of Early Childhood Education 3 

ECED 300 Early Childhood Art Methods 5 

ECED 311 Science and Social Studies Inquiry for the 

Young Child 3 

ECED 332 Reading Development for the Young Child 3 

ECED 342 Language Arts for the Young Child 3 

ECED 352 Developmental Mathematics for the Young Child 3 

ECED 361 Creating an Effective Early Childhood Environment .. 3 
ECED 496 Supervised Teaching in the Public School: 

Early Childhood 6 

ECED 497 Supervised Teaching in an Integrated 

Early Childhood Setting 6 

Students successfully completing the program are eligible to 
apply for initial Massachusetts licensure in Early Childhood: 
Teacher of Students with or without Disabilities (PreK-2). 

• To be completed prior to admission to professional education 
and enrollment in upper-division education courses. 

Total minimum credits: 31.5 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN EARLY 
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (INITIAL 
LICENSURE) 

This program is designed for persons who have a bachelor's 
degree and seek initial licensure in early childhood education 
(PreK-2). 

Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 
section of the catalog for information regarding graduate pro- 
gram application policies and procedures. 

Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.8 based upon four years 
of course work 

• A qualifying score on the Communications, Literacy Skills and 
the Early Childhood portions of the Massachusetts Tests for 
Educator Licensure® (MTEL) 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 



• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course 
work 

Students seeking initial licensure should consult the section of 
this catalog titled "School of Education and Allied Studies" for 
professional education admission and retention information 
and institutional deadlines. Admission to professional education 
includes successful completion of ECED 510, 25 hours in a K-2 
setting and 1 5 hours in a preschool setting. An additional 40 
hours is attached to the professional courses: reading, language 
arts, mathematics, science and social studies. 

All accepted students must enroll under the direction of 
their adviser in GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning, which is 
described under "Graduate Advisers and Program Planning" in 
the "School of Graduate Studies" section of this catalog. 

Program Requirements 

Students must complete the following courses. Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

ECED 510 Fundamentals of Early Childhood 3 

ELED 51 1 Theory and Practice in Teaching Reading Reading 3 

ELED 513 Mathematical Applications for the Classroom 3 

ELED 514 Exemplary Practice in Science and 

Social Studies Classrooms 3 

ELED 515 Differentiating Instruction: 

Creating Inclusive Classrooms 3 

ECED 563 Early Childhood Curriculum: Ages 5-7 3 

ECED 596 Practicum: Early Childhood Education 6 or 12 

ECED 597 Practicum: Preschool 6 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

Exit Requirement: A student teaching documentation package 
(competency portfolio) 

Total minimum credits: 34 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN EARLY 
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (PROFESSIONAL 
LICENSURE) 

This degree program is designed for persons who hold initial 
licensure in early childhood education (grades PreK-2) and 
are seeking professional licensure in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. The program is designed to meet the "appropri- 
ate master's degree" requirement, which is part of the criteria for 
professional stage licensure as set forth in the most recent MA 
DESE licensure regulations. 

Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 
years of work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon work 
completed in the junior and senior years 

• A composite scoie of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• An initial teaching license with one year full-time teaching 
experience 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



181 



Elementary and 

Early Childhood Education 



bSc 



BRIUGfcWArfcK 
STATfc COLLtGE 



Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" sec- 
tion of the catalog for information regarding graduate program 
application policies and procedures. 

All accepted students must enroll under the direction of 
their adviser in GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning, which is 
described under "Graduate Advisers and Program Planning" in 
the "School of Graduate Studies" section of this catalog. 

Program Requirements Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 

Education Master s Core Courses 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

EDMC 531 The Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 3 

EDMC 532 The Teacher as Leader: From Issues to Advocacy 3 

EDMC 533 The Standards-Based Classroom: Instruction 

and Assessment for Diverse Learners 3 

EDMC 538 The Professional Teacher (final program course) 3 

Program Content Electives 15 

• Elect five graduate courses (400 level U/G or 500 level) from 
arts and sciences disciplines. Courses must be approved by 
the academic adviser. Alternative courses must be approved 
by the program coordinator. 

• No more than two courses should be in any one arts and sci- 
ences discipline. 

• Suggested disciplines: art, English, history, mathematics, 
reading and sciences. 

• Course selections must be approved by an adviser. 

Total minimum credits: 31 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN EARLY 
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 
(NON-LICENSURE) 

This degree program is also offered to elementary school teach- 
ers who already hold a standard level or professional license. In 
such cases, it is offered for professional development purposes 
and may be individualized. 

Total minimum credits: 31 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN READING 

The graduate reading program offers the degree of Master of 
Education with a specialty in reading and institutional endorse- 
ment for Massachusetts licensure as reading specialist (all levels). 
Program learning experiences and outcomes are designed to 
meet the recommendations of the Professional Standards and 
Ethics Committee and the advisory group to the National Council 
of Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) Joint Task Force 
of the International Reading Association (IRA), Reading/Literacy 
Specialist. Candidates must complete all of the following course 
requirements and program requirements. As part of their pro- 
gram, students must satisfactorily complete the following 
curriculum: 

Admission Requirements 

The reading program designates the teacher of reading license 
as a specialist teacher license. Program prerequisites include 



Massachusetts teaching licensure and at least one year of teach- 
ing experience under the area of licensure. 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.8 based on four years of 
work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based on work completed 
in the junior and senior years 

• A composite score of 900 (clear admit) or 600 (conditional 
admit) in the quantitative and verbal parts of the GRE 
General Test 

• a) Possession of a Massachusetts State Department of 
Elementary and Secondary Education active teacher licensure 
(Initial or Professional) 

or 

b) A qualifying score on the Massachusetts Tests for 
Educator Licensure " (MTEL) Communication and Literacy 
Skills (01 ) 

• One year of experience teaching in the area of licensure 

• A rating of "one" on three letters of recommendation 
(at least one from teaching supervisor and one who 
has knowledge of applicant's aptitude for advanced 
scholarship) 

• Foundational knowledge in computer technology (Microsoft 
Word and Office) 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

Program Requirements 

• Successful completion of the Literacy Professional's Library 

• An oral presentation or exhibit pertaining to a topic in 
literacy 

• Successful completion of two 200-hour practica 

• Successful completion of a Literacy Professional's Portfolio 

• Support for the work of professional literacy organizations 

• A passing score on the written comprehensive examination 

a) To be accepted for practicum experiences (READ 558 
and READ 559), licensure as a reading specialist with 
the Massachusetts State Department of Elementary and 
Secondary Education 
or 

b) Initial licensure with the Massachusetts State Department 
of Elementary and Secondary Education and a passing score 
on the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL) 
Communication and Literacy Skills (01) and a passing score 
on the MTEL® Reading Subject (08). 

Credits 



READ 550 Improving Literacy Instruction 

READ 551 Case Studies in Literacy Acquisition 

and Development 

READ 552 Literacy Assessment Principles and Techniques. 
READ 553 Issues in Literacy Education for Social Justice.... 

READ 554 Research in Literacy Teaching and Learning 

READ 555 Supervision and Administration of 

Literacy Programs : 

READ 556 Literacy Curriculum Development 

and Implementation 

READ 558 Practicum Experience for the Consulting 



3 
3 



182 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



89 



IDGEWATER 



ATE COLLEGE 



Elementary and 

Early Childhood Education 



Teacher of Reading 1 3 

READ 559 Practicum Experience for a Consulting 

Teacher of Reading II 3 

READ 560 Literacy Research Seminar 3 

Total minimum credits: 30 



CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE 
STUDY (CAGS) - READING 

The graduate reading program offers the Certificate of Advanced 
Graduate Study in Reading with an option for institutional 
endorsement for Massachusetts licensure as Teacher of Reading 
(all levels). The 30-credit program is offered to cohort groups who 
move through the entire program together. To enhance the expe- 
rience, courses are scheduled on Saturdays during the academic 
year and as two-week intensives in the summer. 

Students who complete the CAGS program and wish to pur- 
sue a doctoral degree receive an additional benefit. Bridgewater 
State College graduates who apply to and are accepted into the 
doctoral program in reading at UMass-Lowell may apply 12 of 
the credits earned toward the 48 credits required as part of the 
doctorate degree. 

Program learning experiences and outcomes are designed 
to meet the recommendations of the Professional Standards 
and Ethics Committee and the Advisory Group to the National 
Council of Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) Joint Task 
Force of the International Reading Association (IRA), reading/lit- 
eracy supervisor and consultant. 

Admission Requirements 

• Master's degree from an accredited college or university 

• A rating of "one" on three letters of recommendation 
(at least one from teaching supervisor and one who 
has knowledge of applicant's aptitude for advanced 
scholarship) 

• A minimum graduate GPA of 3.0 

• Possession of an active Massachusetts State Department 

of Elementary and Secondary Education (MA DESE) profes- 
sional teacher license 

• a) Possession of MA DESE licensure as reading specialist 

or 

b) A qualifying score on the Massachusetts Tests for 
Educator Licensure® (MTEL) Communications and Literacy 
Skills (01) 

• Three years of experience teaching in the area of licensure 

• Foundational knowledge in computer technology (Microsoft 
Word and Office) 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

Candidates must complete all of the following course require- 
ments and program requirements: 



Course Requirements Credits 

READ 650 Research in Literacy Curriculum and Instruction 3 

READ 651 Socio-Psycholinguistics and Critical Literacy 3 

READ 652 Cultural Foundations of Literacy 3 

READ 653 Diagnosis, Assessment and Evaluation of 

Student Performance and Program Effectiveness 3 

READ 654 Principles and Programs in Professional 

Development 3 

READ 655 Case Studies in N-12 Literacy Curriculum 

and Instruction 3 

READ 670 Seminar 3 

INST 552 Multimedia for Educators 3 



With adviser's consent, another 500- or 600-level course in 
instructional technology may be substituted for INST 552 

Suggested alternatives 

READ 681 CAGS Literacy Practicum 

READ 682 CAGS Literacy Practicum II as needed 

Program Requirements 

• Successful completion of a research project in exemplary 
literacy practices 

• Successful completion of a multimedia exhibit in exemplary 
literacy practices 

• Support for the work of professional literacy organizations 

• Successful defense of the research project and multimedia 
exhibit 

Total minimum credits: 30 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



183 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Professor Samuel Baumgarten 

Graduate Program Coordinators: 

Professor Marcia Anderson (Athletic Training), 
Assisant Professor Karen Richardson (Health Promotion/ 
Physical Education) 

Professors: Edward Braun, Lydia Burak, Robert Haslam, 
Joseph Huber, Amos Nwosu 

Associate Professors: Kathleen Laquale, Ellyn Robinson, 
Pamela Russell, Deborah Sheehy 

Assistant Professors: Robert Colandreo, James Leone, 
Mark Mattesi, Maura Rosenthal 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1215 
Location: Tinsley Center, Room 232A 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/ 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BA in Physical Education (awarded for completion of major 
core without a concentration) 

• BS in Athletic Training 

• BS in Health Education 

Concentrations: Community Health, School Health 

• BS in Physical Education (awarded for completion of major 
core and selected concentration) 

Concentrations: 

Coaching, Exercise Science/Health Fitness, 
Motor Development Therapy/Adapted Physical 
Education, Recreation, Recreation and Fitness Club 
Administrationjeacher Licensure in Physical Education PreK- 
8 and 5-12 

• MEd in Health Promotion 

• MS in Athletic Training 

• MS in Physical Education 

Concentrations: Adapted Physical Education, Applied 
Kinesiology, Human Performance and Health Fitness, 
Strength and Conditioning, Individualized Program 

POSTBACCALAUREATE TEACHER 
LICENSURE PROGRAMS 

• Physical Education 

• Health (Health, Family and Consumer Sciences) 

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• Coaching 

• Dance* 

• Exercise Physiology 

• Health Promotion 

• Health Resources Management* 

• Recreation 

• Interdisciplinary Minor 



The Department of Movement Arts, Health Promotion, and 
Leisure Studies offers both undergraduate and graduate pro- 
grams in the areas of athletic training, health promotion/educa- 
tion and physical education. At the undergraduate level the ~ 
department offers a major in physical education, which leads to 
a Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts degree; a major in ath- 
letic training, which leads to a Bachelor of Science degree; and 
a major in health promotion/education, with concentrations in 
community health and school health, which leads to a Bachelor 
of Science degree. In addition, minors in coaching, exercise 
physiology, health promotion, health resources management, 
and recreation are also offered. A minor in dance is offered jointly 
by the Department of Movement Arts, Health Promotion and 
Leisure Studies and the Department of Theater and Dance, and a 
minor in health resources management is offered jointly by the 
Department of Movement Arts, Health Promotion and Leisure 
Studies and the Department of Management. 

Graduate study offered by the department includes a pro- 
gram in the area of health promotion, which leads to a Master 
of Education in Health Promotion; a program in the area of 
athletic training, which leads to a Master of Science in Athletic 
Training; and a program in the area of physical education, 
which leads to a Master of Science degree in physical educa- 
tion. Postbaccalaureate programs for initial teacher licensure in 
physical education and health education are available and are 
described under the department's graduate programs. 



DEPARTMENT OBJECTIVES 

• Provide a quality physical education liberal arts major pro- 
gram with a variety of concentrations providing advanced 
professional preparation. 

• Provide quality physical education activity courses to assist 
students in developing lifetime activity patterns. 

• Provide a quality health education major program with 
courses that deal with health promotion issues and healthful 
living styles. 

• Provide a quality athletic training program with courses that 
will prepare students to make successful contributions to the 
athletic training profession. 

• Instill an atmosphere of health and well-being for students. 



CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Many career opportunities exist in the areas of Movement Arts, 
Health Promotion and Leisure Studies. These opportunities are 
tied to the majors-athletic training, health education/promotion, 
and physical education-and the concentrations within those 
majors where students are provided with the specific information 
and skills needed to apply knowledge in professional capacities. 

Career opportunities for MAHPLS graduates abound in ath- 
letic settings, schools and hospitals, nonprofit organizations, and 
public or private community agencies and organizations. 

The athletic training major is accredited by the Commission 
on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). The 
teacher preparation programs in health and physical education 
are accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of 
Teacher Education (NCATE). 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF ARTS/BACHELOR 
OF SCIENCE 

The Department of Movement Arts, Health Promotion and Leisure 
Studies offers the physical education major an opportunity to 
seek a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. In addi- 
tion, a comprehensive health education major, leading toward 
a Bachelor of Science, may be selected. A Bachelor of Science in 
Athletic Training is also available. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS — 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

All students majoring in physical education and seeking a 
Bachelor of Arts degree must complete a minimum of 1 20 credits 
required for graduation and must complete 41 credits in the 



major as outlined below: 

Required Physical Education Core Courses: 
Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher 

in the six courses listed below. Credits 

PHED 100 Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy 3 

PHED 117 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of 

Sport and Physical Education 3 

PHED 217 Principles of Motor Learning and Performance 3 

PHED 318 Socio-Cultural Foundations of Sport 
(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 

Requirement-CWRM) 3 

PHED 385 Biomechanics 3 

PHED 401 Physiology of Exercise 4 

Activity Requirement 



All majors in physical education must accumulate at least nine 
credits in activity and/or theory and practice courses. The 
nine credits must come from at least six different types of 
traditional activity courses or theory and practice courses. 
(Taking the second level of a course after having taken the 
first level will not count as part of that six activity or theory 
and practice courses). Students must achieve a "C-" or better 
in required activity and theory and practice courses. Each 
concentration will determine its own requirements for the 



nine credits 9 

Health Course Requirement 

HEAL 102 Health and Wellness 3 

Cognate Courses 

BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 4 

or 

BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 

PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 

or 



PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 



Elective (choose one) 

Any 300-400 level ATTR, HEAL, PHED, or RECR course 

or one of the following dance courses 3 

PHED 146 Dance Appreciation 
PHED 251 Dance History 
PHED 255 Creative Dance I 
PHED 256 Creative Dance II 

Total minimum credits: 41 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE - ATHLETIC 
TRAINING 

This major is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of 
Athletic Training Education (CAATE), and prepares the athletic 
training student with the necessary academic and clinical experi- 
ences to sit for the National Athletic Trainer's Association/Board 
of Certification Examination (BOC).The program includes courses 
in injury prevention, recognition, assessment and immediate care 
of athletic injuries, health care administration and professional 
development and responsibility. 

Admission into the ATEP program is limited and competitive. 
A separate application process is required for admission and is 
due to the ATEP Program Director by March 1 of the student's 
sophomore year. Candidates should contact the program director 
for application materials or download them from the ATEP Web 
site at www.bridgew.edu/atep. 



Required Athletic Training Courses Credits 

ATTR 100 Taping and Bracing 1 

ATTR 112 Sports First Aid 3 

ATTR 240 Introduction to Athletic Training 3 

ATTR 241 Level I Clinical Experience in Athletic Training 3 

ATTR 340 Sports Injury Management-Lower Extremity 3 

ATTR 341 Sports Injury Management-Upper Extremity 3' 

ATTR 342 Level II Clinical Experience in Athletic Training 3 

ATTR 343 Level III Clinical Experience in Athletic Training 3 

ATTR 410 Nutritional Concepts for Health Care Practitioners.... 3 

ATTR 442 Therapeutic Exercise 3 

ATTR 443 Pharmacology for the Physically Active 1.5 

ATTR 446 Medical Conditions and Disabilities 

of the Physically Active 1.5 

ATTR 450 Therapeutic Modalities 3 

ATTR 454 Level IV Clinical Experience in Athletic Training 3 

ATTR 455 Level V Clinical Experience in Athletic Training 3 

ATTR 490 Administration of Athletic Training 3 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at vmw.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



■UDGBVATBS 



MAI I ( Ol I I (.1 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies 



Cognate Courses 

BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 4 

BIOL 251 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 4 

BIOL 252 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 

PHED 100 Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy 3 

PHED 385 Biomechanics 3 

PHED 401 Physiology of Exercise 4 

HEAL 102 Health and Wellness 3 

PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 



Total minimum credits: 71 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE — PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

All students majoring in physical education and seeking a 
Bachelor of Science degree must complete a minimum of 1 20 
credits required for graduation and must complete a designated 
area of study identified as a concentration. The department offers 
seven concentrations. Two of the concentrations lead to initial 
teacher licensure in physical education, one at the PreK-8 level 
and one at the 5- 1 2 level. The other concentrations have been 
developed to prepare graduates to pursue career opportunities 
in community-based organizations such as business, industry, 
agencies and hospitals. These programs, which include field 
experiences in various settings in the community, have expanded 
the role of the professional in the fields of physical education and 
health promotion beyond the teaching environment in schools, 
thus preparing the graduate for new career opportunities. 



COACHING CONCENTRATION 

This concentration prepares the physical education major to 
apply concepts and principles related to all aspects of coaching, 
including the player, team, coach and administration of athletic 
programs for youth and adults. The field experience is an impor- 
tant aspect of this concentration. 



Required Physical Education Core Courses 
Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher 

in the six courses listed below. Credits 

PHED 100 Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy 3 

PHED 117 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of 

Sport and Physical Education 

PHED 217 Principles of Motor Learning and Performance 3 

PHED 318 Socio-Cultural Foundations of Sport 
(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 

Requirement-CWRM ) 3 

PHED 385 Biomechanics 3 

PHED 401 Physiology of Exercise 4 



Activity Requirements 
Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher 

in the six courses listed below. Credits 

PHED 152 Theory and Practice of Lifeguard Training 2 

PHED 204 Theory and Practice of Progressive Resistance 

Training 2 

PHED 209 Theory and Practice of Metabolic Training 2 

One activity from Individual Sports Category 1 

One activity from Team Sports Category 1 

One activity from Individual or Team Sports Category 1 

Additional Required Courses 

•ATTR 112 Sports First Aid 3 

PHED 414 Coaching 3 

*PHED 416 Planning and Implementing Coaching 

Leadership Strategies 3 

PHED 498 Field Experience in Physical Education 3 



*RECR 461 Organization and Administration in Recreation 
* These courses must be taken prior to the field experience, 
PHED 498. 



Required Health Course 

HEAL 102 Health and Wellness 3 

Cognate Courses 

BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 4 

or 

BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 

PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 

or 



PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 

Elective (choose one): 

Any 300- or 400- level ATTR, HEAL, PHED or RECR 

course or one of the following dance courses 3 

PHED 146 Dance Appreciation 
PHED 251 Dance History 
PHED 255 Creative Dance I 
PHED 256 Creative Dance II 

Total minimum credits: 56 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



bSc 



BR1DGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies 



EXERCISE SCIENCE/HEALTH FITNESS 
CONCENTRATION 

This concentration prepares students for career opportunities in 
health and fitness in such settings as industry, hospitals, agen- 
cies, education and human service organizations. Emphasis is on 
human performance and cardiovascular health, which includes 
physical health evaluation, graded exercise tests, exercise pre- 
scription and physical activity program development. A field 
experience off campus in a setting identified above is an impor- 
tant aspect of this concentration. 

Required Physical Education Core Courses 

Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher 

in the six courses listed below. Credits 

PHED 100 Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy 3 

PHED 117 Historical and Philosophical Foundations 
of Sport and Physical Education 3 

PHED 217 Principles of Motor Learning and Performance 3 

PHED 318 Socio-Cultural Foundations of Sport 
(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 
Requirement-CWRM) 

PHED 385 Biomechanics 



3 

3 

PHED 401 Physiology of Exercise 4 

Activity Requirement 

Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher in the courses 
listed below. 

PHED 163 Aerobics 1 

PHED 204 Theory and Practice of Progressive 

Resistance Training 2 

PHED 209 Theory and Practice of Metabolic Training 2 

Four additional credits of activities selected in 

consultation with adviser 4 



Additional Required Courses 

PHED 201 Fitness Testing in Exercise Science 

PHED 400 Physiology and Techniques of Strength Fitness 

PHED 402 Exercise Metabolism 

PHED 403 Cardiovascular Analysis Evaluation and 

Rehabilitation 

PHED 404 Exercise Prescription 

PHED 405 Exercise Circulation: Mechanisms 

and Morphology 

PHED 409 Planning, Implementing and Evaluating 

Fitness Programs 

PHED 498 Field Experience in Physical Education 

Required Health Courses 

HEAL 102 Health and Wellness 

HEAL 471 Nutrition 



Cognate Courses 

BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 4 

or 

BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 

PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 

or 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 

Total minimum credits: 63 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

MOTOR DEVELOPMENT THERAPY/ 
ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
CONCENTRATION 

This concentration prepares the physical education major to 
work with children, youth and adults with disabilities. The pro- 
gram focuses on physical education to meet the developmental, 
sport, dance and leisure needs of special populations as well as 
the emotional and social needs of individuals with disabilities. 
The concentration prepares graduates for career opportunities 
in rehabilitation centers, clinics, hospitals and social agencies 
as well as private and public schools. Opportunities for practi- 
cal experience are provided through off-campus field experi- 
ences as well as the department-sponsored Children's Physical 
Developmental Clinic. 

Required Physical Education Core Courses 
Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher 

in the six courses listed below. Credits 

PHED 100 Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy 3 

PHED 117 Historical and Philosophical Foundations 

of Sport and Physical Education 3 

PHED 217 Principles of Motor Learning and Performance 3 

PHED 318 Socio-Cultural Foundations of Sport 
(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 
Requirement-CWRM) 

PHED 385 Biomechanics 



3 

3 

PHED 401 Physiology of Exercise 4 

Activity Requirement 

Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher in the courses listed 
below. 

PHED 235 Rhythmic Activities: Programming for all Ages 1 

PHED 280 New Games 1 

PHED 285 Gymnastics 2 

Individual: Archery, Tennis or Golf 1 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



187 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion j 
and Leisure Studies 





Feam: Volleyball or Soccer 1 

Dance: Folk, Square or Modern 1 

Aquatics: any swimming course 1 

Htness/Wellness: any fitness/wellness course 1 

Additional Required Courses 

PHED 324 Physical and Motor Development of 

Individuals with Disabilities 3 

PHED 451 Prosthetics and Orthotics 3 

PHED 494 Advanced Study of Motor Programs for 

Individuals with Chronic Health Conditions 3 

PHED 498 Field Experience in Physical Education 3 

Required Health Course 

HEAL 102 Health and Wellness 3 

Cognate Courses 

BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 4 

or 

BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 

PSYC 224 Child Psychology 3 

or 

PSYC 226 Adolescent Psychology 

PSYC 327 Psychology of Exceptional Children 3 

or 

PSYC 328 Psychology of Mental Retardation 

PSYC 355 Behavior Analysis 3 

PSYC 370 Abnormal Psychology 3 



Total minimum credits: 59 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



MOTOR DEVELOPMENT THERAPY/ 
ADAPTIVE PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
CONCENTRATION - REQUIREMENTS FOR 
SPECIAL EDUCATION MAJORS 

Students with a bachelor of arts major in physical education and 
a major in special education may select the motor development 
therapy/adapted physical education concentration. The academic 
program for the concentration is adjusted slightly to accommo- 
date those students. 

Required Physical Education Core Courses 
Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher 

in the six courses listed below. Credits 

PHED 100 Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy 3 

PHED 1 1 7 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of 

Sport and Physical Education 3 

PHED 217 Principles of Motor Learning and Performance 3 



PHED 318 Socio-Cultural Foundations of Sport 



(Writing Intensive in the Major 

Core Curriculum Requirement-CWRM) 3 

PHED 385 Biomechanics | 

PHED 401 Physiology of Exercise '....4 

Activity Requirement 
Grade Requirement 



Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher in the courses 



listed below. 

PHED 235 Rhythmic Activities: Programming for all Ages 1 

PHED 280 New Games 1 

PHED 285 Gymnastics 2 

Individual: Archery, Tennis or Golf 1 

Team: Volleyball or Soccer 1 

Dance: Folk, Square or Modern 1 

Aquatics: any swimming course 1 

Fitness/Wellness: any fitness/wellness 1 

Additional Required Courses 

PHED 324 Physical and Motor Development of 

Individuals with Disabilities 3 

PHED 451 Prosthetics and Orthotics 3 

PHED 494 Advanced Study of Motor Programs for 

Individuals with Chronic Health Conditions 3 

PHED 498 Field Experience in Physical Education 3 

Required Health Course 

HEAL 102 Health and Wellness 3 

Cognate Courses 

BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 4 

or 

BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 

PSYC 224 Child Psychology 3 

or 

PSYC 226 Adolescent Psychology 

SPED 202 Introduction to Special Education 3 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 3 

SPED 302 Principles and Application of Behavioral 

Management for the Special Needs Learner 3 



Total minimum credits: 59 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies 



bSc 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



RECREATION CONCENTRATION 

This concentration provides the physical education major with 
the knowledge and skills necessary to pursue careers in a wide 
variety of leisure service settings. Specifically, students who have 
combined the study of physical education with the recreation 
concentration will be capable of arranging leisure time experi- 
ences and providing leadership for children and adults in govern- 
ment, industry and community service agencies. 

Required Physical Education Core Courses 
Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher 

in the six courses listed below. Credits 

PHED 100 Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy 3 

PHED 117 Historical and Philosophical Foundations of 
Sport and Physical Education 3 

PHED 217 Principles of Motor Learning and Performance 3 

PHED 318 Socio-Cultural Foundations of Sport 
(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 
Requirement-CWRM) 

PHED 385 Biomechanics 



3 

3 

PHED 401 Physiology of Exercise 4 

Activity Requirement 
Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher 

in the six courses listed below. Credits 

PHED 280 New Games 1 

One activity each from Areas A, B, C, D (see below) 4 

Two additional activities from areas A, B, C, D (see below) 

— may be a second level course 2 

Two additional from Areas A, B, C, D and E 2 

A) Individual/Dual Sports 

B) Team Sports 

C) Dance 

D) Aquatics 

E) Fitness/Wellness 



Additional Required Courses 

RECR 230 Introduction to Recreation 

RECR 332 Leadership and the Group Process 

RECR 461 Organization and Administration in Recreation 
RECR 462 Programming for Recreation and Leisure 

Required Health Course 

HEAL 102 Health and Wellness 



Cognate Courses 

BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 4 

or 

BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 

PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 

or 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 
SOC1 102 Introduction to Sociology 3 



Elective (choose one) 

Any 300- or 400- level ATTR, HEAL, PHED or RECR course 

or one of the following dance courses 3 

PHED 146 Dance Appreciation 
PHED 251 Dance History 
PHED 255 Creative Dance I 
PHED 256 Creative Dance II 

Recommended Elective Experience 

RECR 498 Field Experience in Recreation (3-1 5) 

Total minimum credits: 56 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

RECREATION AND FITNESS CLUB 
ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION 

A concentration in recreation and fitness club administration 
prepares physical education majors to work with a variety of cli- 
entele at recreation and commercial fitness clubs. Concepts and 
principles related to cardiovascular health, physical activity and 
recreation program development and administration are empha- 
sized. Practical field experiences are an essential component of 
this concentration. 

Required Physical Education Core Courses 
Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher 

in the six courses listed below. Credits 

PHED 100 Applied Musculoskelatal Anatomy 3 

PHED 117 Historical and Philosophical Foundations 

of Sport and Physical Education 3 

PHED 217 Principles of Motor Learning and Performance 3 

PHED 318 Socio-Cultural Foundations of Sport 
(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 
Requirement-CWRM) 

PHED 385 Biomechanics 



3 

3 

PHED 401 Physiology of Exercise 4 

Activity Requirement 
Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher in the courses 
listed below. 

PHED 163 Aerobics 1 

PHED 204 Theory and Practice of Progressive Resistance 

Training 2 

PHED 209 Theory and Practice of Metabolic Training 2 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



189 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies 



BSC 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



PHED 280 New Games 1 

Three additional credits selected from 

Areas A, B, C, Dand E 3 

A) Individual/Dual Sports 

B) Team Sports 

C) Dance 

D) Aquatics 

E) Fitness/Wellness 

Additional Required courses 

PHED 400 Physiology and Techniques of Strength Fitness 3 

PHED 404 Exercise Prescription 3 

PHED 409 Planning, Implementing and Evaluating 

Fitness Programs 3 

PHED 498 Field Experience in Physical Education 3 

or 

RECR 498 Field Experience in Recreation 

RECR 332 Leadership and the Group Process 3 

RECR 461 Organization and Administration in Recreation 3 

Required Health Course 

HEAL 102 Health and Wellness 3 

Cognate Courses 

BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 4 

or 

BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 

PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 

or 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 



Total minimum credits: 56 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

TEACHER LICENSURE CONCENTRATION 
(PreK-8) 

Prerequisites 

• Declaration as a physical education major 

• Acceptance in School of Education and Allied Studies teacher 
preparation program prior to taking 300-level physical educa- 
tion teacher preparation courses. 

Required Physical Education Core Courses 
Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher in the six cours- 
es listed below. Credits 

PHED 100 Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy 3 

PHED 117 Historical and Philosophical Foundations 

of Sport and Physical Education 3 

PHED 217 Principles of Motor Learning and Performance 3 



PHED 318 Socio-Cultural Foundations of Sport 
(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 



Requirement-CWRM) 3 

PHED 385 Biomechanics 3 

PHED 401 Physiology of Exercise I 

Activity Requirements 
Grade Requirement 



Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher in the courses 



listed below. 

PHED 281 Theory and Practice of Educational Dance 2 

PHED 282 Theory and Practice of Games 2 

PHED 285 Gymnastics 2 

PHED 186 Track and Field 1 

Choose one of the following 1 



PHED 134 Self Defense I 

PHED 163 Aerobics 

PHED 188 Jogging and Road Running 

PHED 190 Conditioning 

PHED 193 Weight Training 

PHED 194 Wrestling 

PHED 234 Yoga 

PHED 257 Movement and Relaxation- Theory, Practice an 
Performance 

Choose one of the following 1 

PHED 150 Beginner Swimming 
PHED 202 Orienteering 
PHED 203 Basic Rock Climbing 
PHED 250 Intermediate Swimming 
PHED 278 Bicycle Touring 
PHED 280 New Games 
PHED 356 Canoeing I 

Additional Required Courses 
Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher in the first eight 
courses listed below, as well as in PSYC 227, before admittance to the 
final course, the practicum in student teaching. Successful completion 



of the practicum also requires a grade of "C-" or higher. 

*PHED 205 Introduction to Teaching Physical 

Education in the Public Schools 2 

PHED 210 Developmental Kinesiology 3 

*PHED 225 Observation and Analysis of Movement 

for Children 4 

PHED 324 Physical and Motor Development of 

Individuals with Disabilities 3 

PHED 326 Teaching Physical Education to Children 3 

PHED 329 Teaching and Curriculum Development 

in the Middle and Junior High School 3 

PHED 335 Planning, Implementation and Evaluation 

in Teaching Physical Education 6 

PHED 495 Field-Based Pre-Practicum (PreK-8) - 

Physical Education 2 

PHED 496 Practicum in Student Teaching 

(PreK-8) -Physical Education 12 



* Must be completed prior to admission to professional educa- 
tion and enrollment in all other teacher licensure courses. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies 



bSc 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Required Health Course 

HEAL 102 Health and Wellness 3 

Cognate Courses 

BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 4 

or 

BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 3 

Current certificate from the American Red Cross for Standard 
First Aid and CPR. 

Total minimum credits: 76 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

TEACHER LICENSURE CONCENTRATION 
(5-12) 

Prerequisites 

• Declaration as a physical education major 

• Acceptance in School of Education and Allied Studies teacher 
preparation program prior to taking 300-level physical 
education teacher preparation courses. 

Required Physical Education Core Courses 
Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher 

in the six courses listed below. Credits 

PHED 100 Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy 3 

PHED 117 Historical and Philosophical Foundations 

of Sport and Physical Education 3 

PHED 217 Principles of Motor Learning and Performance 3 

PHED 318 Socio-Cultural Foundations of Sport 
(Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 

Requirement-CWRM) 3 

PHED 385 Biomechanics 3 

PHED 401 Physiology of Exercise 4 

Activity Requirement 
Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher in the courses 
listed below. 

PHED 281 Theory and Practice of Educational Dance 
OR choose two of the following dance courses 2 

PHED 153 Jazz Dance 

PHED 161 Folk Dance 

PHED 164 Square Dance 

PHED 166 African Dance 

PHED 167 Street Dance 

PHED 168 Ballroom 

PHED 235 Rhythmic Activities 
PHED 282 Theory and Practice of Games 2 



PHED 285 Gymnastics 2 

PHED 186 Track and Field 1 

Choose one of the following 1 

PHED 134 Self Defense I 

PHED 163 Aerobics 

PHED 188 Jogging and Road Running 

PHED 190 Conditioning 

PHED 193 Weight Training 

PHED 194 Wrestling 

PHED 234 Yoga 

PHED 257 Movement and Relaxation Theory, Practice and 
Performance 

Choose one of the following 1 

PHED 150 Beginner Swimming 
PHED 202 Orienteering 
PHED 203 Basic Rock Climbing 
PHED 250 Intermediate Swimming 
PHED 278 Bicycle Touring 
PHED 280 New Games 
PHED 356 Canoeing I 

Additional Required Courses 
Grade Requirement 

Students must achieve a grade of "C-" or higher in the first eight 
courses listed below, as well as in PSYC 227, before admittance to the 
final course, the practicum in student teaching. Successful completion 
of the practicum also requires a grade of "C-" or higher. 

*PHED 205 Introduction to Teaching Physical Education 

in the Public Schools 2 

PHED 210 Developmental Kinesiology 3 

*PHED 212 Strategies and Analysis of Motor Skills 3 

PHED 31 5 Teaching Team and Individual Sports 4 

PHED 324 Physical and Motor Development of 

Individuals with Disabilities 3 

PHED 329 Teaching and Curriculum Development in 

the Middle and Junior High School 3 

PHED 335 Planning, Implementation and Evaluation 

in Teaching Physical Education 6 

PHED 491 Field-Based Pre-Practicum (5-12) - 

Physical Education 2 

PHED 492 Practicum in Student Teaching (5-12) - 

Physical Education 12 

* Must be completed prior to admission to professional educa- 
tion and enrollment in all other teacher licensure courses. 

Required Health Course 

HEAL 102 Health and Wellness 3 

Cognate Courses 

BIOL 100 General Principles of Biology 4 

or 

BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 3 

Current certificate from the American Red Cross for Standard 
First Aid and CPR. 

Total minimum credits: 76 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

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191 



BSC 

UKIIX.I * M I K 
SI AI h < OCLfcGfc 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies 



Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
vwvw.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



HEALTH EDUCATION 

HEALTH EDUCATION MAJOR 

Health education can lead to the improved health status of 
individuals, families and communities. It involves the use of sys- 
tematic strategies to improve health knowledge, attitudes, skills 
and behaviors. Health educators work in schools, public health 
agencies, voluntary nonprofit organizations, hospitals, colleges 
and universities, business and industries. 

The health education major is designed to guide students 
though learning experiences that emphasize the multiple dimen- 
sions of health, and draws on the behavioral and natural sciences 
as well as health science and public health. The major prepares 
students to design, implement and evaluate scientifically and 
methodologically sound health education experiences, and to 
equip students with the professional skills that will enable them 
to be proficient practitioners. 

Students wishing to pursue teaching licensure in health/family 
and consumer sciences must meet the criteria for admission to 
professional education programs as well as declare a minor in 
secondary education. Those interested in teacher licensure should 
refer to the "Secondary Education and Professional Programs" 
section of this catalog. 

HEALTH EDUCATION-NO CONCENTRATION 

Core Health Courses Credits 

HEAL 200 Principles and Practices of Health Education 3 

HEAL 315 School and Community Health 3 

HEAL 385 Epidemiology: The Study of Diseases 3 

HEAL 450 Health Promotion Strategies 3 

HEAL 451 Program Planning in Health Promotion 3 

HEAL 490 Senior Seminar in Health 1 

Cognate Courses 

BIOL 251 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 4 

BIOL 252 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 



Health Courses 

Choose five from the following 15 

HEAL 401 Human Sexuality 
HEAL 405 Drugs in Society 
HEAL 407 Stress Management 
HEAL 420 Women's Health 
HEAL 471 Nutrition 

HEAL 477 Environmental and Consumer Health 
HEAL 484 Death and Dying Education 

Total minimum credits: 39 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 120 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, seethe "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

HEALTH EDUCATION-COMMUNITY HEALTH 
CONCENTRATION 

Core Health Courses Credits 

HEAL 200 Principles and Practices of Health Education 3 

HEAL 315 School and Community Health 3 

HEAL 385 Epidemiology: The Study of Diseases 3 

HEAL 450 Health Promotion Strategies 3 

HEAL 451 Program Planning in Health Promotion 3 

HEAL 490 Senior Seminar in Health 1 

Cognate Courses 

BIOL 251 Human Anatomy and Physiology I - 

BIOL 252 Human Anatomy and Physiology II - 

ENGL 302 Technical Writing 3 

Health Courses 

HEAL 102 Health and Wellness 3 

HEAL 452 Research and Evaluation in Health Promotion 3 

Also, four courses from the following 12 

HEAL 401 Human Sexuality 

HEAL 405 Drugs in Society 

HEAL 407 Stress Management 

HEAL 420 Women's Health Issues 

HEAL 471 Nutrition 

HEAL 477 Environmental and Consumer Health 
HEAL 484 Death and Dying Education 

Internship 

HEAL 498 Internship , 9 

Total minimum credits: 54 



192 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies 



bSc 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



HEALTH EDUCATION-SCHOOL HEALTH 
CONCENTRATION 



Core Health Courses Credits 

HEAL 200 Principles and Practices of Health Education 3 

HEAL 315 School and Community Health 3 

HEAL 385 Epidemiology: The Study of Diseases 3 

HEAL 450 Health Promotion Strategies 3 

HEAL 451 Program Planning in Health Promotion 3 

HEAL 490 Senior Seminar in Health 1 

Cognate Courses 

PSYC 227 Development through the Life Cycle 3 

BIOL 251 Anatomy and Physiology 1 4 

BIOL 252 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 

PHED 200 Fitness for Life 3 

Health Content Courses 

HEAL 300 Current Issues in Health 3 

HEAL 401 Human Sexuality 3 

HEAL 405 Drugs in Society 3 

HEAL 407 Stress Management 3 

HEAL 471 Nutrition 3 

HEAL 477 Environmental and Consumer Health 3 

Education Courses 

NOTE: Students in the School Health Concentration must com- 
plete a minor in secondary education. 

EDHM 210 Introduction to Teaching 3 

EDHM 235 Learning and Motivation 3 

EDHM 335 Assessment and Planning 3 

EDHM 445 Content Area Reading, Writing and Study Skills ....3 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 3 

HEAL 491 Field Based Pre-Practicum in Health 2 



HEAL 495 Practicum in Student Teaching-Elementary Health .. 6 
HEAL 496 Practicum in Student Teaching-Secondary Health.... 6 

Total minimum credits: 77 



MINOR PROGRAMS 



COACHING MINOR 

The coaching minor meets the needs of the coaching profession 
by providing an opportunity for students who are not majoring 
in physical education to combine the study of coaching with a 
major in any discipline. This multidisciplinary program approach 
will prepare the student for coaching related careers in commu- 
nity-based organizations such as youth sports programs, church 
programs, recreational settings and school settings. 

Required Courses Credits 

ATTR 112 Sports First Aid 3 

PHED 200 Fitness for Life 3 

PHED 210 Developmental Kinesiology 3 

PHED 217 Principles of Motor Learning and Performance 3 

PHED 414 Coaching 3 

PHED 416 Planning and Implementing Coaching 

Leadership Strategies 3 

PHED 498 Field Experience in Physical Education 

(three credits only) 3 

Total minimum credits: 21 



DANCE INTERDISCIPLINARY MINOR 

This program, offered in cooperation with the Department of 
Theater and Dance, is designed to give students an overall expe- 
rience and appreciation for dance as an art form and educational 
vehicle. It is designed to supplement major work in theater arts, 
physical education, music, art and elementary education. The 
program includes the study of techniques of various styles of 
dance, dance history and theory, choreography and production. 



Required Courses Credits 

THEA/PHED 155 Dance Practicum (two semesters) 2 

THEA/PHED 251 Dance History 3 

THEA/PHED 255 Creative Dance 1 3 

THEA/PHED 256 Creative Dance II 3 

THEA/PHED 357 Dance Production Theory 

THEA/PHED 358 Dance Production Techniques 



1 



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193 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
I and Leisure Studies 



PHED154 Ballet 2 

Six credits in the following 6 

PHED 237 Theory and Practice of Jazz Dance, Fall 

PHED 242 Theory and Practice of Ballet, Fall 

PHED 245 Theory and Practice of Ballet, Spring 

PHED 247 Theory and Practice of Jazz Dance, Spring 

PHED 248 Theory and Practice of Modern Dance, Fall 

PHED 249 Theory and Practice of Modern Dance, Spring 

PHED 259 Dance Repertory 

PHED 271 Theory and Practice of Tap Dance 
Elective (choose one) 1 

PHED 161 Folk Dance 

PHED 164 Square Dance 

PHED 168 Ballroom Dance 

PHED 268 Ballroom Dance II - Theory, Practice 
and Performance 
MUSC 160 Music: A Listening Approach is recommended 

but not required. 
(All activity courses successfully completed in this minor 

count toward the minimum 120 degree credits required for 

graduation.) 

Total minimum credits: 23 

EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY MINOR 

A minor in exercise physiology is available to students not major- 
ing in physical education who desire in-depth study of how 
the body reacts to participation in physical exercise. Emphasis 
is on strength development, cardiovascular function, metabo- 
lism, exercise prescription and the interaction of body systems. 
Career opportunities are available in health and fitness settings 
associated with industry, hospitals, agencies and human service 
organizations. 

Required Courses Credits 

HEAL 471 Nutrition 3 

PHED 400 Physiology and Techniques of Strength Fitness 3 

PHED 401 Physiology of Exercise 4 

PHED 402 Exercise Metabolism 3 

PHED 403 Cardiovascular Analysis, Evaluation 

and Rehabilitation 3 

PHED 404 Exercise Prescription 3 

BIOL 102 Introduction to Zoology 4 

Total minimum credits: 23 

HEALTH PROMOTION MINOR 

The department offers a health promotion minor, which is open 
to all undergraduates with the exception of health majors. The 
health promotion minor provides an opportunity for students to 
combine the study of health with a major in any discipline. This 
multidisciplinary program approach will prepare the student 
for health-related careers in community-based organizations, 
such as business, industry, hospitals and agencies that deal with 
health problems, health promotion or health services. 

Required Courses Credits 

HEAL 102 Health and Wellness 3 

HEAL 401 Human Sexuality 3 

HEAL 405 Drugs in Society 3 



HEAL 430 Epidemiology and Community Health 

HEAL 471 Nutrition ] 

HEAL 477 Environmental and Consumer Health J 

Elective (choose one) 3 

HEAL 300 Current Issues in Health 
HEAL 302 American Red Cross Standard First Aid 
HEAL 407 Stress Management 
HEAL 420 Women's Health Issues 
HEAL 450 Health Promotion Strategies 
HEAL 451 Program Planning in Health Promotion 
HEAL 483 Nutrition and Cardiovascular Health 
HEAL 484 Death and Dying Education 
HEAL 499 Directed Study in Health 

Total minimum credits: 21 

HEALTH RESOURCES MANAGEMENT 
INTERDISCIPLINARY MINOR 

The Department of Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies cooperates with the Department of 
Management in offering an interdisciplinary minor in health 
resources management. 

Students from relevant liberal arts and other related programs 
may elect this minor to develop skills and background knowledge 
to gain employment at the entry level of health care delivery 
management. This minor is most appropriate for students in the 
social sciences, social work, physical education, communication 
arts, management and other human service-oriented professions. 
The minor is not available to health majors. 

Required Courses Credits 

ACFI 100 Fundamentals of Financial Reporting 3 

HEAL 102 Health and Wellness 3 

HEAL/SCWK 403 Interdisciplinary Approaches to the 

Delivery of Health Services 3 

HEAL 430 Epidemiology and Community Health 3 

MGMT 130 Principles of Management 3 

MGMT 140 Human Resources Management 3 

Elective (choose one) 3 

ACFI 200 Financial Accounting 

ACFI 385 Managerial Finance 

HEAL 401 Human Sexuality 

HEAL 405 Drugs in Society 

HEAL 471 Nutrition 

HEAL 477 Environmental and Consumer Health 
MGMT 200 Marketing Principles 
MGMT 375 Personnel Development 

Total minimum credits: 21 

RECREATION MINOR 

The recreation minor is open to all undergraduates. It provides a 
multidisciplinary approach to producing recreation professionals 
capable of administering, supervising and leading leisure servic- 
es. Students who minor in recreation may choose to specialize in 
one of the following: therapeutic recreation, outdoor recreation, 
play specialist or recreation generalist. Students who complete 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies 



the recreation minor will be prepared to assume careers in a 
wide variety of settings - social institutions, hospitals, business 
and industry, preschools, community schools, Y's, the out-of- 
doors (challenge/adventure/Outward Bound) and government 
correctional institutions. 

Required Courses Credits 

RECR 230 Introduction to Recreation 3 

RECR 332 Leadership and the Group Process 3 

RECR 461 Organization and Administration in Recreation 3 

RECR 462 Programming for Recreation and Leisure 3 

Two additional courses in recreation to be chosen with 
department approval depending upon elected area 
of specialization 6 

Recommended Elective Experience 

RECR 498 Field Experience in Physical Education (3-15) 

Total minimum credits: 18 

I 

HONORS PROGRAM 

i The honors program in movement arts, health promotion and 
leisure studies provides highly motivated Movement Arts, Health 
Promotion and Leisure Studies majors with opportunities to 
I enhance their academic program through intensive scholarly 
study and research designed to be of assistance in postgradu- 
ate employment or in the pursuit of an advanced degree in 
movement arts, health promotion or leisure studies. Contact the 
Department of Movement Arts, Health Promotion and Leisure 
Studies for further information concerning eligibility and 
application. 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

The Department of Movement Arts, Health Promotion and Leisure 
Studies offers several programs designed to meet the needs 
of graduate students including: postbaccalaureate programs 
that allow students to apply for initial licensure as a Teacher 
of Physical Education (PreK-8 or 5- 1 2) or Teacher of Health 
Education (PreK-1 2) and programs leading to the degrees of 
Master of Education in Health Promotion and Master of Science 
in Physical Education. 

POSTBACCALAUREATE INITIAL LICENSURE 
PROGRAM TEACHER OF PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION (PreK-8, 5-12) 

This program is designed for persons who have a bachelor's 
degree and wish to be licensed as a teacher of physical education 
(PreK-8 or 5-12). Students who successfully complete the curricu- 
lum below are eligible to apply for initial licensure. 

For information regarding application procedures and admis- 
sion standards, students should consult the "School of Graduate 
Studies" section of this catalog. Students seeking initial licen- 
sure should consult the section of this catalog titled "School 
of Education and Allied Studies" for professional education 
admission and retention information and important institutional 
deadlines. 



Admission Requirements 

• A2.8GPA 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation. At least one 
letter of recommendation should be an academic reference 
from a professor. 

• A qualifying score on the Communication and Literacy 
Skills portion of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator 
Licensure® (MTEL). 

• Official transcripts of undergraduate and graduate 
course work. 

Program Requirements 

Students must complete the following 34 credits 

or the equivalent. Credits 

PHED 100 Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy 3 

PHED 117 Historical and Philosophical Foundations 

of Sport and Physical Education 3 

PHED 210 Developmental Kinesiology 3 

PHED 217 Principles of Motor Learning and Performance 3 

PHED 318 Socio-Cultural Foundations of Sport 3 

PHED 324 Physical and Motor Development of 

Individuals with Disabilities 3 

PHED 385 Biomechanics 3 

PHED 401 Physiology of Exercise 4 

Activity Requirement 9 

Specific physical education activities pertinent to teaching at 
this level as identified by the department teacher preparation 
committee. 

Teacher Licensure Courses 

PreK-8 Credits 

*PHED 205 Introduction to Teaching Physical Education 

in the Public Schools 2 

*PHED 225 Observation and Analysis of 

Movement for Children 4 

PHED 326 Teaching Physical Education to Children 3 

PHED 329 Teaching and Curriculum Development in 

the Middle and Junior High School , 3 

PHED 335 Planning, Implementation and Evaluation in 

Teaching Physical Education 6 

PHED 495 Field-Based Pre-Practicum (PreK-8) - 

Physical Education 2 

PHED 496 Practicum in Student Teaching 

(PreK-8)-Physical Education 12 • 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 3 

or 

PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 
Current certificate from the American Red Cross for Standard 
First Aid and CPR. 

Total minimum credits (PreK-8). 69 



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195 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies 



5-12 Credits 

*PHED 205 Introduction to Teaching Physical 

Education in the Public Schools 2 

# PHED 212 Strategies and Analysis of Motor Skills 3 

PHED 315 Teaching Team and Individual Sports 4 

PHED 329 Teaching and Curriculum Development 

in the Middle and Junior High School 3 

PHED 335 Planning, Implementation and Evaluation 

in Teaching Physical Education 6 

PHED 491 Field-Based Pre-Practicum (5-12) - 

Physical Education 2 

PHED 492 Practicum in Student Teaching (5-12) - 

Physical Education 12 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 3 

or 

PSYC 100 Introductory Psychology 



Current certificate from the American Red Cross for Standard 
First Aid andCPR. 

Total minimum credits (5-12): 69 
* To be completed prior to admission to professional education 
and enrollment in upper-division (300 level) education courses. 



POSTBACCALAUREATE INITIAL LICENSURE 
PROGRAM TEACHER OF HEALTH (TEACHER 
LICENSURE IN HEALTH/FAMILY AND 
CONSUMER SCIENCES — PreK-12) 

This program is designed for persons who have a bachelor's 
degree and wish to be licensed as teachers of health education 
(PreK- 1 2). Students who successfully complete the curriculum 
below are eligible. For information regarding application pro- 
cedures and admission standards, students should consult the 
"School of Graduate Studies" section of this catalog. 

Students seeking initial licensure should consult the section 
of this catalog entitled "School of Education and Allied Studies" 
for information pertaining to licensure, admission to and reten- 
tion in professional education, as well as important institutional 
deadlines. 

In addition to GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning (one 
credit) taken their first semester, students accepted to the post- 
baccalaureate licensure program must complete the following: 

Admission Requirements 

• A2.8GPA 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation. At least one 
letter of recommendation should be an academic reference 
from a professor. 

• A qualifying score on the Communication and Literacy Skills 
portion of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure* 
(MTEL). 

• Official transcripts of undergraduate and graduate 
course work. 



Program Requirements Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning \ 

BIOL 251 Human Anatomy and Physiology 1 4 

*EDHM 210 Introduction to Teaching 3 

EDHM 235 Learning and Motivation 3 

EDHM 335 Assessment and Planning 3 

EDHM 445 Content Area Reading, Writing and Study Skills 3 

HEAL 200 Principles and Practices of Health Education 3 

HEAL 300 Current Issues in Health 3 

HEAL 401 Human Sexuality 3 

HEAL 405 Drugs in Society 3 

HEAL 407 Stress Management 3 

HEAL 430 Epidemiology and Community Health 3 

HEAL 450 Health Promotion Strategies 3 

HEAL 471 Nutrition 3 

HEAL 477 Environmental and Consumer Health 3 

HEAL 491 Field-Based Pre-Practicum in Health 2 

HEAL 495 Practicum in Student Teaching - Elementary Health . 6 
HEAL 496 Practicum in Student Teaching - Secondary Health .. 6 

PHED 200 Fitness for Life 3 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 3 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 3 

Students must supply evidence of current certification in 
Standard First Aid and CPR. 

Total minimum credits: 67 
*To be completed prior to admission to professional education 
and enrollment in upper-division education courses. 



MASTER OF EDUCATION IN HEALTH 
PROMOTION 

This program is designed for individuals who are currently 
involved in health promotion activities or who seek to prepare for 
health-related careers in community based organizations such as 
business, industry, agencies, hospitals and voluntary and official 
health agencies, as well as for in-service teachers. 

Students who apply for admission to the MEd program in 
health promotion should have completed at least 1 2 hours of 
credit at the baccalaureate level in the social/behavioral sciences, 
at least one course in epidemiology or health services organiza- 
tion and six hours of credit at the baccalaureate level in health- 
related courses. Students may petition the department graduate 
committee to substitute job related experiences for any of the 
aforementioned academic requirements. 

Applicants who do not possess an adequate background in 
health and/or related areas will be required to make up course 
deficiencies. Such background course work will not be applied to 
the graduate program's minimum credit requirements. 

Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 
years of work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon work 
completed during the junior and senior year 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies 



Program Requirements 

Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning (required of most first 
semester graduate students, see "Graduate Advisers and 
Program Planning" in the "School of Graduate Studies" 

section of this catalog) 1 

All master's degree candidates in health promotion will be 
required to successfully complete the following health core 



requirements. 

HEAL 504 Seminar in Health Promotion Theory 

and Literature 3 

HEAL 511 Research and Evaluation Methods in 

Health Promotion 3 

HEAL 518 Quantitative Methods in Health Promotion 

and Epidemiology 3 

HEAL 519 Scientific and Philosophical Foundations 

of Health Promotion 3 

HEAL 520 Designing and Administering Health 

Promotion Programs 3 

All master's degree candidates will be required to choose one of 
four alternative courses of study. 

Option A Credits 

• Successful completion of the core requirements 

and GRPP 501 16 

• Individualized program of health (HEAL) electives 
by advisement. Nonhealth electives may be taken 

only with prior written consent of adviser 18 

• Comprehensive Examination on core requirements 

Total minimum credits (option A): 34 

Option B Credits 

• Successful completion of the core requirements 

and GRPP 501 16 

• Individualized program of health (HEAL) electives 
by advisement. Non-health electives may be taken 

only with prior written consent of adviser 15 

• Health Promotion Project (HEAL 501 ) 3 

• Comprehensive Examination: oral defense of health 
promotion project 

Total minimum credits (option B): 34 
Option C Credits 

• Successful completion of the core requirements and 

GRPP 501 16 

• Individualized program of health (HEAL) electives 
by advisement. Non-health electives may be taken 

only with prior written consent of adviser 12 

• Thesis in Health Promotion (HEAL 502) 6 

• Comprehensive Examination : oral defense of thesis 



Total minimum credits (option C): 34 

Option D: Health Fitness Promotion Concentration Credits 

• Successful completion of the core requirements and 

GRPP 501 16 



• Concentration Courses 

PHED 518 Advances in Exercise Metabolism 3 

PHED 519 Advances in Exercise Prescription 3 

PHED 544 Applied Laboratory Techniques in Exercise 
Science 3 

• Total of nine semester hours in any subject area 
chosen with the approval of the graduate faculty adviser. 
These may include HEAL 501 or HEAL 502 9 

• Comprehensive Examination 

a) Examination on core requirements 
or 

b) Oral defense of HEAL 501 
or 

c) Oral defense of HEAL 502 

Total minimum credits (option D): 34 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ATHLETIC 
TRAINING 

This program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation 
of Athletic Training Education (CAATE) and prepares the athletic 
training student with the necessary academic and clinical experi- 
ences to sit for the National Athletic Trainer's Association Board 
of Certification Examination (BOC).The program includes courses 
in injury prevention; recognition, assessment and immediate care 
of athletic injuries; health care administration; and professional 
development and responsibility. 

Admission into the ATEP is limited and competitive. In addi- 
tion to acceptance in the School of Graduate Studies, candidates 
must complete a separate application process, which is due to 
the ATEP program director by March 1 . Candidates should con- 
tact the program director for application materials or download 
them from the ATEP Web site at www.bridgew.edu/atep. 

Prerequisite Content Courses 

Anatomy and Physiology I 
Anatomy and Physiology II 
Introduction to Athletic Training 
Introductory Psychology 
Kinesiology/Biomechanics 
Exercise Physiology 

Protective Techniques in Athletic Training (Taping, bracing 

and protective equipment) 
Current Emergency Cardiac Care Certification (Certification in 

Advanced First Aid, Adult and Pediatric CPR, AED and use 

of barrier devices) 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

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197 



WH 1 IX. 


mi i h 


SIMI 


HI 1 K.I 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies 



Credits 

ATTR 510 Nutritional Concepts for Health Care Practitioners ... 3 

ATTR/PHED 511 Research Methods in Physical Education 3 

ATTR 540 Management of Lower Extremity Conditions 3 

ATTR 541 Management of Upper Extremity and 

Torso Conditions 3 

ATTR 542 Therapeutic Exercise 3 

ATTR 543 Pharmacology for the Physically Active 1.5 

ATTR 546 Medical Conditions and Disabilities of the 

Physically Active 1.5 

ATTR 550 Therapeutic Modalities 3 

ATTR 561 Level I Clinical Experience in Athletic Training 3 

ATTR 562 Level II Clinical Experience in Athletic Training 3 

ATTR 563 Level III Clinical Experience in Athletic Training 3 

ATTR 564 Level IV Clinical Experience in Athletic Training 3 

ATTR 565 Level V Clinical Experience in Athletic Training 3 

ATTR 590 Administration of Athletic Training 3 

Total minimum credits: 39 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

This program is designed for individuals with an undergraduate 
major in physical education, or its equivalent, who wish to pursue 
new career directions related to the field in community-based 
organizations, such as business, industry, agencies, hospitals and 
educational settings or who wish to enhance their undergradu- 
ate preparation through advanced study. Several program con- 
centrations are available and are described below. 

Applicants who do not possess an adequate background in 
physical education and/or related areas will be required to make 
up course deficiencies. Such background course work will not be 
applied to the graduate program's minimum credit requirements. 

Admission Requirements 

• A minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 based upon four 
years of work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon work 
completed during the junior and senior year 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 

course work 

Program Requirements 

The graduate program of study involves a minimum of 30 gradu- 
ate credits. Students must elect one of the following options: 

Concentration in Human Performance and Health 
Fitness 

Required Courses Credits 

PHED 51 1 Research Methods in Physical Education 3 

PHED 515 Advances in Exercise Circulation 3 

PHED 517 Experimental Processes in Physical Education 3 

PHED 518 Advances in Exercise Metabolism 3 



PHED 519 Advances in Exercise Prescription 3 

PHED 544 Applied Laboratory Techniques in Exercise Science .. 3 
PHED 595 Internship in Physical Education 3-6 

Suggested Electives 

Specific course selection will be made by the adviser and student 
based upon the student's professional background and program 

objectives. The following courses would be appropriate 6-7 

HEAL 471 Nutrition 

HEAL 483 Nutrition and Cardiovascular Health 
HEAL 518 Quantitative methods in Health Promotion and 
Epidemiology 

*PHED 400 Physiology and Techniques of Strength Fitness 
PHED 402 Exercise Metabolism 

*PHED 403 Cardiovascular Function, Analysis and Evaluation, 

and Rehabilitation 
PHED 404 Exercise Prescription 

PHED 405 Exercise Circulation: Mechanisms and Morphology 
PHED 502 Research (variable credit) 
PHED 503 Directed Study (variable credit) 
PHED 504 Nutrition for Sports, Exercise and Weight Control 
PHED 516 Exercise Electrocardiography 
PHED 520 Health Fitness Program Planning and Management 
PHED 545 Physical Conditioning and Training in Sports and 
Exercise 

* Recommended based on student's program. Both may 
be taken. 

Total minimum credits: ? 
Concentration in Adapted Physical Education 

Required Courses Credits 

PHED 451 Prosthetics and Orthotics 3 

PHED 484 Physical Education for Children and 

Youth with Disabilities 3 

PHED 494 Advanced Study of Motor Programs for 

Individuals with Chronic Health Conditions 3 

PHED 508 Motor Learning 3 

PHED 51 1 Research Methods in Physical Education 3 

PHED 595 Internship in Physical Education 3-6 

Courses in psychology and/or special education 

appropriate to individual program 9 

Electives appropriate to program 3-6 

Total minimum credits: 30 

Concentration in Applied Kinesiology 

Required Courses Credits 

PHED 51 1 Research Methods in Physical Education 3 

PHED 517 Experimental Processes in Physical Education 3 

Choice of four of the following five courses 12 

PHED 506 Philosophy and Principles of Physical Education 

PHED 508 Motor Learning 

PHED 545 Physical Conditioning and Training in 
Sports and Exercise 

PHED 546 Applied Biomechanics and Movement Analysis 

PHED 571 Psychological and Social Issues in Sport 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Movement Arts, Health Promotion 
and Leisure Studies 



Electives 

Four courses as electives 12 

or 

Two-three courses (six-nine credits) and a project or thesis 
(three-six credits) 

Total minimum credits: 30 
Concentration in Strength and Conditioning 

Required Courses Credits 

PHED 504 Nutrition for Sports, Exercise and Weight Control .... 3 

PHED 511 Research Methods in Physical Education 3 

PHED 517 Experimental Processes in Physical Education 3 

PHED 523 Strength and Conditioning Laboratory 3 

PHED 543 Foundations of Resistance Training 3 

PHED 545 Physical Conditioning and Training in 

Sports and Exercise 3 

PHED 595 Internship in Physical Education 3-6 

Electives 

Three classes or a combination of classes, directed 

studies or thesis 9 

Suggested Electives 

PHED 400 Physiology and Techniques of Strength Fitness 

PHED 402 Exercise Metabolism 

PHED 403 Cardiovascular Analysis, Evaluation and 
Rehabilitation 

PHED 404 Exercise Prescription 

PHED 405 Exercise Circulation: Mechanisms and Morphology 
PHED 406 Personal Fitness Training 
PHED 502 Research 
PHED 503 Directed Study 

PHED 506 Philosophy and Principles of Physical Education 
PHED 508 Motor Learning 
PHED 516 Exercise Electrocardiography 
PHED 520 Health Fitness Program Planning and 
Management 

PHED 546 Applied Biomechanics and Movement Analysis 
HEAL 471 Nutrition 

HEAL 483 Nutrition and Cardiovascular Health 
HEAL 518 Quantitative Methods in Health Promotion 
and Epidemiology 
Upon completion of the program, all students must take the 
comprehensive exams or complete a written thesis under the 
guidance of an adviser. 

Total minimum credits: 30 

individualized Program of Study 

Development of a program of study, in consultation with the 
program adviser, to meet individual career and educational goals. 
The program must include a minimum of 1 5 credits in physical 
education. 

Total minimum credits: 30 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



199 



Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs 



BSC 



HKIIXil VI \ l I R 
STATt COU-fcCE 



High School Education 



Middle School Education 



Educational Leadership 
Instructional Technology 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Associate Professor Lynne Yeamans 

Graduate Program Coordinators: 

Associate Professor John-Michael Bodi 

(SEAS Core Courses), 
Assistant Professor Thomas Brady 

(Accelerated Postbaccalaureate and 

Postbaccalaureate Programs), 
Associate Professor Lynn Yeamans 

(Educational Leadership), 
Associate Professor Thanh Nguyen 

(Instructional Technology) 

Professor: Raymond ZuWallack 

Associate Professors: Anne Hird, Theodore Mattocks 

Assistant Professors: Benedicta Eyemaro, Phyllis Gimbel, 
Stephen Nelson 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1320 
Location: Tinsley Center, Room 214 
Web site: www.bridgew.edu/seconded 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• MAT -(High School/Middle School) 

Areas: biology, creative arts, English, history, mathematics, 
music education, physical science, physics 

• MEd in Educational Leadership 

• MEd in Instructional Technology 

POSTBACCALAUREATE LICENSURE 
PROGRAMS 

• Secondary Education 

(High School/Middle School, PreK-12 Specialist) 
Areas: biology, chemistry, dance, earth sciences, English, his- 
tory, mathematics, music, physics, theater, visual art 

• Educational Leadership 

• Instructional Technology (all levels) 



CERTIFICATE OF ADVANCED GRADUATE 
STUDY PROGRAMS (CAGS) 

• Educational Leadership 

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• Secondary Education 
Secondary Education - High School 

(Areas: biology, chemistry, earth sciences, English, history, 
mathematics, physics) 

Secondary Education - Middle School 

(Areas: biology, chemistry, earth sciences, English, history, 

mathematics, physics) 

Secondary Education - Middle-High School 

(Area: visual art) 

Secondary Education - PreK-Middle School 
(Area: visual art) 

Secondary Education - PreK-High School 

(Areas: dance, health/family and consumer science, 

music, theater) 

UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 

All courses are structured to address the transition toward the 
contemporary concerns of human development, diversity, equity 
and ethics. The learner is regarded as one who has an active role 
in constructing his/her knowledge base, values and attitudes. The 
varied cultural backgrounds of students and teachers are seen 
as a positive context in which one can listen, consider and learn. 
The department sees its role as interactive with other education 
departments and with the School of Arts and Sciences, address- 
ing joint missions and fostering the development of curriculum, 
methodologies and perspectives that enhance the individual 
and society. 

All students who intend to become licensed educators must 
apply for admission and be accepted into professional education 
through the School of Education and Allied Studies. All students 
seeking licensure must consult the section of this catalog entitled 
"School of Education and Allied Studies" for information per- 
taining to the state regulations for the licensure of educational 
personnel and important institutional deadlines. 

Students are advised to check the secondary education and 
preprofessional programs Web site periodically at 
www.bridgew.edu/seconded/. 

INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA MINOR 

This program is inactive. 



200 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs 



bSc 



BR1DGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



SECONDARY EDUCATION MINOR (HIGH 
SCHOOL (8-12), MIDDLE SCHOOL (5-8), 
PreK-12 SPECIALIST) 

The department offers a minor in secondary education. A student 
selecting this minor must select a major in an appropriate aca- 
demic discipline. The major requirements for each academic disci- 
pline, including cognates and the secondary education minor, are 
described on the following pages. 

The secondary education minor is designed for students 
who intend to qualify for a teacher license in one of the 
following areas: 

Secondary Education - High School 

(Areas: biology, chemistry, earth sciences, English, history, 

mathematics, physics) 
Secondary Education - Middle School 

(Areas: biology, chemistry, earth sciences, English, history, 

mathematics, physics) 
Secondary Education - Middle-High School 

(Area: visual art) 
Secondary Education - PreK-Middle School 

(Area: visual art) 
Secondary Education - PreK-High School 

(Areas: dance, health/family and consumer science, music, 

theater) 
Teacher of Biology (5-8) 
Teacher of Biology (8-12) 
Teacher of Chemistry (5-8) 
Teacher of Chemistry (8-12) 
Teacher of Dance (all levels) 
Teacher of Earth Science (5-8) 
Teacher of Earth Science (8-12) 
Teacher of English (5-8) 
Teacher of English (8-12) 

Teacher of Health/Family and Consumer Sciences 

(all levels) 
Teacher of History (5-8) 
Teacher of History (8-12) 
Teacher of Mathematics (5-8) 
Teacher of Mathematics (8-12) 
Teacher of Music (all levels) 
Teacher of Physics (5-8) 
Teacher of Physics (8-12) 
Teacher of Theater (all levels) 
Teacher of Visual Art (PreK-8) 
Teacher of Visual Art (5-12) 

In addition to majoring in an appropriate academic discipline 
(see Academic Disciplines for Secondary Education Minors), stu- 
dents seeking 5-8, 8-12, or PreK-1 2 licensure must also complete 
the secondary education minor, and meet all requirements for 
acceptance into the program. 



High School (biology, chemistry, earth sciences, 
English, history, mathematics, physics - grades 8-12) 

Credits 



*EDHM 210 Introduction to Teaching 3 

EDHM 235 Learning and Motivation 3 

EDHM 335 Assessment and Planning 3 

EDHM 445 Content Area Reading, Writing and Study Skills 3 

An appropriate "strategies for teaching" course: 

HSED 412, HSED 414, HSED 422 or HSED 465 3 

EDHM 490 Teaching Practicum 12 

Cognate Courses 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 3 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 3 



* To be completed prior to admission to professional education 
and enrollment in any other education courses. 

Total minimum credits: 33 

Middle School: (biology, chemistry, 

earth sciences, English, history, mathematics, 

physics -grades 5-8) Credits 

*EDHM 210 Introduction to Teaching 3 

EDHM 235 Learning and Motivation 3 

EDHM 335 Assessment and Planning 3 

EDHM 445 Content Area Reading, Writing and Study Skills 3 

An appropriate "strategies for teaching" course: 

MSED 450, MSED 451, MSED 456 or MSED 465 3 

EDHM 490 Teaching Practicum 12 

Cognate Courses 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 3 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 3 

* To be completed prior to admission to professional education 
and enrollment in any other education courses. 

Total minimum credits: 33 



PreK-8, 5-12 and PreK-12 Specialists 
(dance, health/family and consumer 
science, music, theater, visual art) Credits 

*EDHM 210 Introduction to Teaching .' 3 

EDHM 235 Learning and Motivation 3 

EDHM 335 Assessment and Planning 3 

EDHM 445 Content Area Reading, Writing and Study Skills 3 

An appropriate "strategies for teaching" course: 
EDHM 413, EDHM 424, EDHM 425, EDHM 459 or 

HEAL 450 3 

EDHM 490 Teaching Practicum 12 

Cognate Courses 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 3 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 3 



* To be completed prior to admission to professional education 
and enrollment in any other education courses. 

Total minimum credits: 33 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/asXhaX information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



201 



Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs 



bSc 



llHIIM.I \XM I K 

STATE COU.fcC,l-. 



ACADEMIC DISCIPLINES FOR SECONDARY Mathematics (Teacher of Mathematics 

EDUCATION MINORS 5 8 or 8 12) Credits 

Students desiring to complete a minor in secondary education See the "Mathematics and Computer Science" section of this cata- 

(high school, middle school, PreK- 1 2) must also complete an aca- log for discipline area requirements, 

demic major. Appropriate academic majors, along with major and Mu$jc (Teacher f Mu$jc _ „ , , } 
cognate requirements, are listed below. It is important to note 

that in many cases the major or cognate requirements for stu- See the Mus,c sect,on of this catalo 9 for discipline area 

dents selecting an education minor are somewhat different from requirements. 

those that hold for students who do not minor in education. Physics (Teacher of Physics 5-8 or 8-12) 

Biology (Teacher of Biology 5-8 or 8-12) Requirements: Completion of the secondary education minor, the 

See the "Biological Sciences" section of this catalog for discipline BA or BS m P h V SICS ' and PHYS 107 Ex P lorin 9 the Umverse - 

area requirements. See the "Physics" section of this catalog for BA or BS in physics 

requirements. 

Chemistry (Teacher of Chemistry 5-8 or 8-12) 

See the "Chemical Sciences" section of this catalog for discipline Theater ( Teacher of Tneater " aM levels ) 

area requirements. See the "Theater and Dance" section of this catalog for discipline 

_ xr4 area requirements. 

Dance (Teacher of Dance - all levels) 

See the "Theater and Dance" section of this catalog for discipline Visual Art < Teacher of Visual Art PreK " 8 or M 2 > 

area requirements. See the "Art" seaion of this catalog for discipline area require- 
ments. 

Earth Sciences (Teacher of Earth Sciences 

Ma-: coll credits GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

EASC 100 Physical Geology 4 The Department of Secondary Education and Professional 

EASC 101 Historical Geology 4 Programs offers several programs designed to meet the needs of 

EASC 210 Oceanography 3 graduate students. 

Itlr III S .°' ar SySte u m , Astronom y ] An Accelerated Postbaccalaureate licensure program (APB) 

a cr lln ^ eomo 1 rphol °9y 4 leading to initial licensure in designated high school (8- 1 2), 

r . £ lr« '"^logy * middle school (5-8), and PreK- 1 2 special subject areas is offered. 

EASC 360 Petrology 4 _ _ . 2. T . . J?ZZ 

EASC 496 Seminar in Geology 1 A Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree program, in con- 

GEOG 221 Meteorology 3 junct.on with several of the arts and sciences departments of the 

Plus nine additional semester hours of approved colle ?f.< desi 9 ned *>r secondary school teachers who have an 

earth sciences electives 9 mitial llcense and are seekmg a P rofesslonal llcense IS offered - 

Cognate Courses ln addition, the department offers the degree of Master of 

MATH 151-152 Calculus l-ll 6 Education (MEd) in educational leadership and instructional 

or technology. 

MATH 141-142 Elements of Calculus l-ll A Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) in educa- 

CHEM 131-132 Survey of Chemistry l-ll 7 tion with a focus on educational leadership is offered. (In addi- 

or tion, Bridgewater State College CAGS graduates who apply 

CHEM 141-142 Chemical Principles l-ll to and are accepted into a collaborative doctoral program in 

One year of physics or biology 8 educational leadership at the University of Massachusetts-Lowell 

Total minimum credits: 60 may apply up to 1 2 CAGS credits toward the 48 credits required 

for the degree.) 

English (Teacher of English 5-8 or 8-12) 

See the "English" section of this catalog for discipline area 
requirements. 

History (Teacher of History 5-8 or 8-12) 

See the "History" section of this catalog for discipline area 
requirements. 



202 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs 



ACCELERATED POSTBACCALAUREATE 
PROGRAM (APB): INITIAL LICENSURE FOR 
HIGH SCHOOL (SUBJECT AREAS: 8-12), 
MIDDLE SCHOOL (SUBJECT AREAS: 5-8) 
TEACHERS AND PreK-12 SPECIALISTS 
Graduate Program Coordinator: Professor Thomas Brady 

The Accelerated Postbaccalaureate (APB) program is a rigor- 
ous, accelerated graduate level program of study (1 5 credits) 
that leads to initial teacher licensure. Recognizing the unique 
strengths of nontraditional licensure candidates, the APB pro- 
gram is designed for individuals who are committed to becoming 
outstanding teachers. 

The APB program is designed for persons who have a 
bachelor's degree and are seeking initial licensure in one of the 
following fields: 

Teacher of Biology (5-8) 
Teacher of Biology (8-12) 
Teacher of Chemistry (5-8) 
Teacher of Chemistry (8-12) 
Teacher of Dance (all levels) 
Teacher of Earth Sciences (5-8) 
Teacher of Earth Sciences (8-12) 
Teacher of English (5-8) 
Teacher of English (8-12) 
Teacher of History (5-8) 
Teacher of History (8-12) 
Teacher of Mathematics (5-8) 
Teacher of Mathematics (8-12) 
Teacher of Music (all levels) 
Teacher of Physics (5-8) 
Teacher of Physics (8-12) 
Teacher of Theater (all levels) 
Teacher of Visual Art (PreK-8) 
Teacher of Visual Art (5-12) 

APB Admission Criteria 

Candidates for the APB program will be admitted by the Office 
of Graduate Admission Enrollment Management based upon 
the recommendation of the APB coordinator. The coordinator 
will base the admissions recommendations on the candidate's 
potential to be an effective teacher based on multiple indicators 
including, but not limited to, the following: 

• An undergraduate degree with a minimum GPA of 2.8 

• Content competence demonstrated by: 

A passing score on the subject matter test of the 
Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL). 

Note: Candidates who are applying for a license in a field in 
which they did not major are subject to a review of their course 
background in the license area. Additional content courses may 
be required. 

• Literacy, communication and academic competence as 
demonstrated by a passing score on the communication and 
literacy MTEL® 

• Experience with youth at the licensure level 



vidence to be submitted by the program candidate includes: 
Completed application 
Statement of desire to be a teacher 
Resume 
Transcripts 
MTEL® scores 
GRE scores (optional) 

Descriptions of appropriate life experiences 

Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course 
work 

For APB application material and information, contact the Office 
of Graduate Admissions Enrollment Management. 

APB Curriculum Credits 

EDHM 550 Middle and High School Education: Theory 

into Practice (course includes 40 hours of fieldwork) 3 

EDHM 552 Curriculum and Instruction in Middle and High 

School Mathematics and Science 3 

or 

EDHM 553 Curriculum and Instruction in the Middle and 
High School Arts and Humanities (course includes 40 hours 
of fieldwork) 

Note: History candidates in the APB program must also complete 
MSED 450 or HSED 412 after successful completion of EDHM 
550 and EDHM 553 (three credits). 

EDHM 554 Student Teaching Practicum 6 

or 

EDHM 556 Employment-based Prepracticum 
EDHM 558 The Reflective Middle and High School 
Practitioner (includes submission of a complete 

competence portfolio) 3 

Total minimum credits: 15 
Note: As an alternative to the APB program, the Department 
of Secondary Education and Professional Programs will allow 
accepted postbaccalaureate students to follow the undergradu- 
ate course sequence listed earlier in this departmental section 
of the catalog under the heading of Secondary Education Minor. 
The cognates, SPED 203 and PSYC 227 are not a requirement. 
Contact the program coordinator for details and the School of 
Graduate Studies for application information. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING 

The Master of Arts in Teaching degree was developed for high 
school and middle school subject area teachers who have an 
initial license and are seeking a professional license in the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The MAT program is designed 
to meet the "appropriate master's degree" requirement, which is 
part of the criteria for professional stage licensure, as set forth in 
the most recent MA DESE licensure regulations. This degree pro- 
gram will also appeal to secondary school teachers who already 
hold a standard level or professional license and want to acquire 
additional knowledge and a master's degree in the discipline. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



203 



BRIIXiEWATER 

STATE OOKUQi 



Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs 



Applicants not holding a bachelor's degree in the content 
area being pursued for the MAT are subject to a transcript review 
to determine whether additional content course work will be 
required as program prerequisites. 

MATs are available in the following areas: 

Biology 

Creative Arts 

English 

History 

Mathematics 

Music Education 

Physical Science 

Physics 

Students should consult the "School of Graduate Studies" 
section of the catalog for information regarding graduate pro- 
gram procedures. 

Admission Requirements 

• A minimum GPA of 2.75 based upon four years of course 
work or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon course work 
completed durtng the junior and senior years 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and verbal 
parts of the GRE General Test 

• An initial teaching license and teaching experience 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course 
work 

Program Requirements 

Educaton Master's Core Courses Credits 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

EDMC 531 The Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 3 

EDMC 532 The Teacher as Leader: From Issues to Advocacy 3 

EDMC 533 The Standards-Based Classroom: 

Instruction and Assessment for Diverse Learners 3 

EDMC 538 The Professional Teacher (final program course) 3 



Concentration Electives 

A minimum of 18 approved graduate credits in the academic 
area of concentration, which meet the academic and 
professional objectives of the student. For details, please 
refer to the appropriate academic department section 
of this catalog 18 

Successful completion of a comprehensive examination is also 

required. 

Total minimum credits: 33 



EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 
GRADUATE PROGRAM | 

Graduate Program Coordinator: Dr. Lynne Yeamans 

LEAD: LEADING EDUCATORS THROUGH 
ADMINISTRATIVE DEVELOPMENT 

The LEAD program will accommodate people of varied back- 
grounds, prior experience and abilities who are interested in 
becoming school administrators. The program incorporates a 
team approach to prior learning assessment and administration 
preparation, a flexible continuum of learning experiences and an 
induction and mentoring program to support and retain 
administrators. 

The LEAD program is an accelerated initial licensure program 
designed to prepare students for the following professions: 
Supervisor/Director (all levels) 
Administrator of Special Education (all levels) 
School Business Administrator (all levels) 
School Principal/Assistant Principal (PreK-6) 
School Principal/Assistant Principal (5-8) 
School Principal/Assistant Principal (9-12) 
Superintendent/ Assistant Superintendent (all levels) 

Admission Requirements 

• Bachelor's degree from an accredited institution with a mini- 
mum GPA of 2.8 

• Letter of intent articulating participant's philosophy of edu- 
cational leadership in times of change 

• Three letters of recommendation 

• Official copies of all undergraduate and graduate transcripts 

• Initial licensure in other area dependent upon administra- 
tive licensure sought (exceptions are granted on a case by 
case basis as approved by the Massachusetts Department of 
Elementary and Secondary Education) 

• Passing score on the Communication and Literacy 
Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure- (MTEL). 
NOTE: Conditional acceptance into the program may be 
granted without the MTEL® score. However, full admission 
will only be granted if the passing score is submitted by the 
conclusion of the second semester in the program. 

LEAD - POSTBACCALAUREATE PROGRAM 
IN EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 

Credits 

EDLE 509 Seminar for Future Leaders 3 

EDLE 51 1 Educational Leadership and 

Managerial Effectiveness 3 

EDLE 564 Selection and Development of Educational 

Personnel 3 

EDLE 565 School Finance and Business Administration 3 

EDLE 569 Legal Aspects of School Administration 3 



204 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs 



bJsc 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Choose one course from one of the following groups, 
dependent on licensure sought 3 

• Principal/Assistant Principal 

EDLE 561 Elementary School Administration 
EDLE 562 High School Administration 
EDLE 563 Middle School Administration 

• Superintendent/Assistant Superintendent 

EDLE 591 Seminar in Administration: Superintendency 

• Special Education Administrator 

SPED 512 Organization and Administration of 
Special Education 

• School Business Manager 
POLI 521 Public Finance 

or 

POLI 592 Special Topics in Public Administration 

• Supervisor/Director 

EDMC 531 Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 

A six-credit practicum is required 6 

EDLE 580 Practicum in Administration of Special Education 
EDLE 582 Practicum in School Business Administration 
EDLE 583 Practicum in Supervisorship/Directorship 
EDLE 584 Practicum in Elementary School Principalship 
EDLE 585 Practicum in Middle School Principalship 
EDLE 586 Practicum in High School Principalship 
EDLE 587 Practicum in Superintendency/Assistant 
Superintendency 
The portfolio review in EDLE 509 will include training in the 
development of an electronic portfolio, which is an exit require- 
ment for the student's program. 

Total minimum credits: 24 



LEAD - POSTMASTER'S PROGRAM IN 
EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP 

Credits 



EDLE 509 Seminar for Future Leaders 3 

EDLE 664 The Personnel Function of Public Schools 3 

EDLE 665 Fiscal Aspects of School Administration 3 

EDLE 669 Concepts and Cases in School Law 3 

EDLE 677 Systems Planning for Educational Leaders 3 

Choose one course from one of the following groups, 

dependent on licensure sought 3 

• Principal/Assistant Principal 



EDLE 661 Effective School Leadership for Elementary Schools 
EDLE 662 Effective School Leadership for Middle Schools 
EDLE 663 Effective School Leadership for High Schools 

• Superintendent/Assistant Superintendent 
EDLE 691 The School Superintendency 

• Special Education Administrator 

SPED 512 Organization and Administration of Special 
Education 

• School Business Manager 
POLI 521 Public Finance 

or 

POLI 592 Special Topics in Public Administration 



• Supervisor/Director 

EDMC 531 Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 

A six credit practicum from below is required 6 

EDLE 679 Practicum in School Business 
EDLE 680 Practicum in Administration of Special Education 
EDLE 683 Practicum in Supervisorship/Directorship 
EDLE 684 Practicum in Elementary School Principalship 
EDLE 685 Practicum in Middle School Principalship 
EDLE 686 Practicum in High School Principalship 
EDLE 687 Practicum in Superintendency/Assistant 

Superintendency 
EDLE 688 Practicum in Directorship of Guidance 
EDLE 689 Practicum in Directorship of Pupil Personnel 
Services 

The portfolio review in EDLE 509 will include training in the 
development of an electronic portfolio, which is an exit require- 
ment for the student's program. 

Total minimum credits: 24 
Courses in the LEAD program can be transferred into the master's 
degree or CAGS program in educational leadership. 



MASTER OF EDUCATION IN EDUCATIONAL 
LEADERSHIP 

The Master of Education degree (MEd) in educational leadership 
program is designed to prepare students for the following posi- 
tions in school administration: 

Supervisor/Director (all levels) 
Administrator of Special Education (all levels) 
School Business Administrator (all levels) 
School Principal/Assistant Principal (PreK-6) 
School Principal/Assistant Principal (5-8) 
School Principal/Assistant Principal (9-12) 
Superintendent/Assistant Superintendent (all levels) 

These programs have been approved for licensure purposes 
by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary 
Education. This includes licensure reciprocity with signatory 
states under the Interstate Certification Compact. 

Where required, candidates who possess an appropriate 
professional license and who have had three years' employment 
under that license will be eligible for administrator licensure at 
the completion of this program. Documentation of this must be 
on file with the School of Graduate Studies. 

Upon completion of their program option, students seek- 
ing Massachusetts licensure must possess an appropriate 
Massachusetts initial license and have had three years of 
employment in the role covered by that license, except where not 
required by licensure regulations. 

A minimum of 36 approved graduate credits is required in 
this degree program. It should be understood that those who 
anticipate preparing for some of the above positions, such as a 
superintendency, should plan to do graduate work beyond the 
minimum. 

Applicants are required to submit a qualifying score on the 
Communications and Literacy Skills portion of the Massachusetts 
Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL). 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

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205 



bSc 

11 \t I I >l I X \ I Ml 

STATE COtXBGE 



Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs 



Students may choose one of the following program options: ACFI 51 1 Principles of Finance for School Business 

• supervisor/director (various levels) Administration 

• administrator of spec.al education (all levels) Principal/Assistant Principal candidates only choose 

... ... . ... . . one of the following 3 

• school business administrator (all levels) EDLE 561 Elementary School Administration (degree 

• school principal/assistant principal (PreK-6), school princi- reguirement for school principal/assistant principal 
pal/assistant principal (5-8), school principal/assistant prin- (PreK-6) program option) 

opal (9-12) EDLE 562 High School Administration (degree reguirement 

• superintendent/assistant superintendent (all levels) for school principal/assistant principal (9-12) program 
As part of their chosen program option, students must satisfacto- option) 

rily complete the following curriculum: EDLE 563 Middle School Administration (degree 

reguirement for school principal/assistant principal 
Admission Requirements (5-8) program option) 

• A 2.75 GPA based upon four years of work or a 3.0 under- Supervisor/Director candidates only 3 

graduate GPA based upon work completed during the junior EDMC 531 The Standards-Based Classroom: Curriculum 

and senior years Superintendent/assistant superintendent option only 3 

• Licensure track - A gualifying score on the Communications EDLE 591 Seminar in School Administration: 
and Literacy Skills Massachusetts Tests for Educator Tn e Superintendency 

Licensure* (MTEL) Upon completion of their program option, students seeking 

Non-licensure track - A composite score of 900 on the Massachusetts licensure must possess an appropriate initial 

quantitative and verbal parts of the GRE general test or a license and have had three years of employment in the role 

qualifying score on the Communications and Literacy Skills covered by that license. This must be documented in order to 

Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL) become licensed. 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation MEd comprehensive examinations are given to and/or digital 

portfolios are submitted by the committee during the months of 

Initial License Credits November and March only. Students should consult the college 

EDLE 510 Seminar on Educational Leadership for calendar in this catalog for examination request deadlines. 

the Future (prior to admission) 3 Total minimum credits: 36 

EDLE 51 1 Educational Leadership and Managerial For additional information relative to this program, students not 

Effectiveness 3 yet accepted should consult with the coordinator of the program. 

EDLE 530 Research Applications for School 

EDLE e s d 64 r Selection and Development of Educat,ona. * "^' F ' C r ^ E c? F ^^^,5^°^^ 

Personne , H 3 STUDY (CAGS) - EDUCATIONAL 

EDLE 565 School Finance and Business Administration 3 LEADERSHIP 

EDLE 567 Human Concerns in the Schools 3 Graduate students who hold a master's degree in a field of 

or education and who are seeking further study in educational 

EDLE 579 Diversity Issues for School Leaders leadership may pursue the Certificate of Advanced Graduate 

EDLE 569 Legal Aspects of School Administration 3 Study (CAGS) program. This program is designed to enable the 

EDLE 572 Technology for School Administrators 3 student to: 

EDLE 578 Curriculum Improvement 3 • Take educational initiatives by encouraging innovation, plan- 

Practicum (one of the following courses) 6 ning and implementing strategic change and having the self- 

EDLE 580 Practicum in Administration of Special Education confidence to be a risk-taker 

EDLE 582 Practicum in School Business Administration . Ana| and |ontize b , ems b jrj and mterpretmg 

DLE 583 Practicum in Supervisorship/Directorship k information and by resisting premature judgments 

EDLE 584 Practicum in Elementary School Principalship . . - 

EDLE 585 Practicum in Middle School Principalship * Bulld and ma ' n,a,n . ,ea / ns for continuous improvement of 
EDLE 586 Practicum in High School Principalship ' ea J chm ? and lea T 9 by com ™ n '«" n 9 expectations and 

EDLE 587 Practicum in Superintendency/Assistant b * develo P in 9 and empowering others 

Superintendency * Expand learning opportunities for all constituencies by hav- 

School business administrator candidates only 6 in 9 and advocating a need to be a lifelong learner 

ACFI 510 Accounting for School Business Managers Program Description 

The CAGS in Educational Leadership is a cohort, weekend 
program through which students earn 34 credits beyond the 
master's and may meet state certification requirements for en 
cational leaders through a college-sponsored internship. 




SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



B^C 

BRIPGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 




Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs 



In the cohort model, a group of 1 8-24 students begins Practicum (one practicum from below) 3-6 

the program together and moves through it as a group. Class EDLE 603 Directed Study in School Administration 

sessions are planned for Friday evening and all day Saturday. EDLE 679 School Business Administrator 

Classes are held on six weekends in the fall and spring semesters. EDLE 680 Practicum in Administration of Special Education 
Summer courses for the CAGS program are offered on a flexible EDLE 683 Practicum in Supervisorship/Directorship 
schedule. EDLE 684 Practicum in Elementary School Principalship 

Students who complete the CAGS program and wish to pur- EDLE 685 Practicum in Middle School Principalship 

sue a doctoral degree receive an additional benefit. Bridgewater EDLE 686 Practicum in High School Principalship 
State College graduates who apply to and are accepted into the EDLE 687 Practicum in Superintendency/Assistant 
doctoral program in educational leadership at UMass-Lowell may Superintendency 
apply 1 2 of the credits earned toward the 48 credits required as EDLE 688 Practicum in Directorship of Guidance 
part of the doctorate degree. EDLE 689 Practicum in Directorship of Pupil Personnel 

Services 

Admission Standards and Criteria An Qra| defense of the CAGS | eadership project is required 
Entrance to the program will be determined based upon the Tota l mjnjmum credits . 40 

following 

i . Master's degree from an accredited college or university LIBRARY MEDIA GRADUATE PROGRAM 

(official transcript required) _ . ... 

, a m i x j" This proqram is inactive. 

• Three letters of recommendation (one from immediate 

supervisor) : 

• Completed application form INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY 

• Academic certification through Massachusetts Department GRADUATE PROGRAM 

of Elementary and Secondary Education 

« ,.r • r ■ .. . , + ci :I | Graduate Proqram Coordinator: Dr. Thanh Nguyen 

• Qualifying score on the Communication and Literacy Skills y y; 

portion of the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® 

(MTEL) POSTBACCALAUREATE PROGRAM: INITIAL 

Pmnram nf <t„Hw LICENSURE-INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY 

Program of Study (ALL LEVELS) 

The initial courses in this program are designed in part to start x ' 

students working on their leadership projects - introduction to This P ro 9 ram is designed for students who have a bachelor's 

CAGS, research issues for school administration, and systems de 9 ree and seek mitial licensure in instructional technology 

planning. The remaining courses are designed to provide a ( a " levels). 

sound knowledge base for practitioners and meet state licensure Admission Requirements 

requirements. Applicants must meet the following criteria in order to be 

Content Courses Credits admitted by the School of Graduate Studies and the School of 

EDLE 661 Effective School Leadership for Education and A,lied Studies - 

Elementary Schools 3 • A minimum GPA of 2.8 based upon four years of course work 

or or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon course work com- 

EDLE 662 Effective School Leadership for Middle Schools pleted during the junior and senior years 

or • Three appropriate letters of recommendation. At least one 
EDLE 663 Effective School Leadership for High Schools letter of recommendation should be an academic reference 

EDLE 664 The Personnel Function of Public Schools 3 from a professor 

EDLE 665 Fiscal Aspects of School Administration 3 • A qualifying score on the Communications and Literacy Skills 

EDLE 667 Communication Between and Among portion f tn e Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure ® 

School Stakeholders 3 (MTEL) 

cn^c f ™ r° nC < eptS an f d A C f eS ' m }r°? 3 • Official 'transcripts of undergraduate and graduate 

EDLE 670 Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study r 3 3 

/ ^ A _ r > r . J _ course work 

(CAGS) Seminar 3 nl .... 

EDLE 672 Technology for Administrators 3 Please note that admissions decisions to the postbaccalaureate 

EDLE 675 Research Issues in School Administration 3 programs are made on a rolling basis when applications are 

EDLE 677 Systems Planning for Educational Leaders 3 submitted within a reasonable time frame prior to the start of the 

EDLE 678 Curriculum Development and academic semester. 

Program Management 3 Anyone with an undergraduate GPA less than 2.8 should 

EDLE 681 CAGS Extern 3 contact the School of Graduate Studies for information regarding 

EDLE 682 CAGS Extern II 1 a low-GPA remedy. 

EDLE 691 The School Superintendency 3 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bhdgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



bSc 

BRIPCEWATER 

STATE COLLEGE 



Secondary Education and 
Professional Programs 



Non-degree students will be allowed to enroll in two courses 
or six credits prior to matriculation. 

Students admitted to the Graduate Certificate in Instructional 
Technology program will be allowed to transfer four courses or 
12 credits into the postbaccalaureate program with the permis- 
sion of the program coordinator, providing that the courses com- 
pleted meet the course requirements for the postbaccalaureate 
program. 

Course requirements Credits 

INST 509 Foundations of Instructional 

Technology 3 

INST 522 Instructional 

Design 3 

INST 523 Information Access and the 

Internet 3 

INST 526 Making Connections: 

Networking 3 

INST 529 Assistive Technology 

3 

INST 596 Clinical Experience 6* 

Total minimum credits: 21 

*Six credits are required in the clinical experience, INST 596, 
unless three credits are waived by the School of Education and 
Allied Studies due to licensure status. 

Students successfully completing the program are eligible 
to apply for initial Massachusetts Licensure in Instructional 
Technology (all levels). 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN 
INSTRUCTIONAL TECHONOLOGY 

This 30-credit program prepares leaders in teaching with current 
technology, both in PreK- 1 2 schools and in adult professional 
settings. The program combines technical skills and knowledge 
with current teaching and learning theory and aims to develop 
understanding of the dynamic relationship between technology 
and the organization into which it is introduced. 

Applicants must meet the criteria below in order to be 
admitted by the School of Graduate Studies and the School of 
Education and Allied Studies. 

• Completed application for admission, including $50 applica- 
tion fee 

• A minimum GPA of 2.8 based upon four years of course work 
or a 3.0 undergraduate GPA based upon course work com- 
pleted during the junior and senior years 

• Three appropriate letters of recommendation. At least one 
letter of recommendation should be an academic reference 
from a professor 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course 
work 

• A composite score of 900 on the quantitative and ver- 
bal parts of the GRE general test or a qualifying score 
on the Communication and Literacy Skills portion of the 
Massachusetts Test for Educator Licensure - (MTEL) 



Admission decisions to the Master of Education degree in 
instructional technology program are made on a deadline basis. 
Current admission deadlines are Feb. 1 5 for summer session 
admission, May 1 5 for fall semester admission and Oct. 1 for 
spring semester admission. For students with an undergraduate 
GPA less than 2.8, a low-GPA remedy is available. 

Note: Students who have been admitted and completed the 
Graduate Certificate in Instructional Technology are permitted to 
transfer four courses or 1 2 credits into the Master of Education 
in Instructional Technology program with the permission of the 
graduate coordinator providing that the courses completed meet 
the course requirements for the Master of Education degree in 
instructional technology. Students who have been admitted 
and completed the postbaccalaureate program are permitted, to 
transfer five courses or 1 5 credits into the Master of Education 
in Instructional Technology program with the permission of the 
graduate coordinator, providing that the courses completed meet 
the course requirements for the Master of Education degree in 
instructional technology. 

Requirements for completion of the Master of 
Education Degree in Instructional Technology Program 

Successful completion of the Master of Education degree in 
instructional technology requires that a candidate complete a 
30-credit program of study and a research project, and pass a 
comprehensive examination based on the research project. 

Required Courses Credits 

INST 509 Foundations of InstructionalTechnology 3 

INST 522 Instructional Design 3 

INST 523 Information Access and the Internet 3 

INST 524 Technology Leadership 3 

INST 526 Making Connections: Networking 3 

INST 529 Assistive Technology 3 

INST 525 Emergent Technology and Learning Environments 3 

or 

INST 552 Multimedia for Educators 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

INST 590 Seminar in Instructional Technology: Research and 

Analysis 3 

INST 595 Advanced Research Seminar 3 

Total minimum credits: 30 

POSTMASTER'S LICENSURE IN 
INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY 

This program is inactive. 



208 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Special Education and 
Communication Disorders 



FACULTY 

Chairperson: Professor Robert MacMillan 

Communication Disorders Program Coordinator: 

Professor Sandra Ciocci 

Graduate Program Coordinator: 

Associate Professor Kenneth Dobush 

Professors: Lisa Battaglino, Lidia Silveira 

Associate Professors: David Almeida, Delayne Connor, 
Mary Connor, Jeri Katz 

Department Telephone Number: 508.531.1226 

Location: Hart Hall, Room 218 

Web site: www.bridgew.edu/spec/ed 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

• BSE in Special Education (Teacher of Students with Moderate 
Disabilities PreK-8 or 5-12) 

• BSE in Special Education (Teacher of Students with Severe 
Disabilities - all levels) 

• BSE in Special Education 
Concentration: Communication Disorders 

• BSE in Elementary Education/MEd in Special Education 
(Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities PreK-8) 
five-year Dual License program 

• MEd in Special Education (Initial Licensure, Teacher of 
Students with Moderate Disabilities PreK-8 or 5-12) 

• MEd in Special Education (Initial Licensure, Teacher of 
Students with Moderate Disabilities, PreK-8) for Elementary 
and Early Childhood Teachers 

• MEd in Special Education (Partial Fulfillment of Professional 
Licensure, Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities 
PreK-8 or 5-12) 

• MEd in Special Education (Initial Licensure, Teacher of 
Students with Severe Disabilities, all levels) 

• MEd in Special Education (Non-licensure) 



POSTBACCALAUREATE LICENSURE 
PROGRAMS 

• Special Education (Teacher of Students with Moderate 
Disabilities PreK-8 or 5-12) 

• Special Education (Teacher of Students with Severe 
Disabilities-all levels) 



UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

• Inclusive Practices in Special Education and Communication 
Disorders 

• Professional Practices in Special Education and 
Communication Disorders 

• Communication Disorders 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

Special Education 

The Department of Special Education and Communication 
Disorders offers undergraduate programs designed for students 
interested in obtaining Massachusetts initial licensure as a 
Teacher of Students with Disabilities and a program in preprofes- 
sional studies in communication disorders. 



MAJORS IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 

The programs have been designed in accordance with 
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary 
Education standards and include license reciprocity with 
signatory states under the Interstate Certification Compact. 
Programs meet standards of the Council for Exceptional 
Children (CEC). The School of Education and Allied Studies 
is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of 
Teacher Education (NCATE). 



BSE IN SPECIAL EDUCATION-TEACHER OF 
STUDENTS WITH MODERATE DISABILITIES 

(PreK-8 or 5-12) 

Admission Requirements 

• Candidates are enrolled in two majors: special education and 
an arts and sciences major. 

• Candidates must meet School of Education and Allied 
Studies Professional Education Program admission require- 
ments that include, but are not limited to, passage of the 
Communication and Literacy portion of the Massachusetts 
Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL) and an under-graduate 
GPA of 2.8 (with "C+" or better in ENGL 101 and ENGL 102) 
prior to enrolling in SPED 300 or 400 level course work. 

Program Requirements 

• In consultation with advisers, undertake appropriate course 
work and activities. 

• Candidates must complete appropriate core curriculum and 
arts and sciences requirements. 

• a) PreK-8 candidates must, prior to the student teaching 

experience, 

1 . complete an appropriate psychology course 
(either PSYC 224 or PSYC 227 or equivalent) 

2. have passed the General Curriculum MTEL® 

b) 5-12 candidates must, prior to the student teaching 
experience, 

1 . complete an appropriate psychology course 
(PSYC 227 or equivalent) 

2. have either passed a subject content MTEL® or the 
General Curriculum MTEL® 

• Candidates will also be required to pass the Foundations of 
Reading MTEL® prior to licensure 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



BRIPCEWAT BB 
STATE C()Ui.(.l 



Special Education and 
Communication Disorders 



Cognate Requirements 

PreK-8 candidates must complete: 

PSYC 224 Child Psychology 3 

or 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle or 
equivalent 

5- 1 2 candidates must complete: 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life 

Cycle or equivalent 3 

Licensure Requirements 

*SPED 202 Introduction to Special Education 3 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in Schools and Society 3 

SPED 302 Principles and Application of Behavioral 

Management for the Special Needs Learner 3 

SPED 303 Principles and Procedures of Assessment 

of Special Needs Learners 3 

SPED 402 Children with Reading Disability: 

Diagnosis and Teaching Strategies 3 

SPED 403 Curriculum Development and 

Implementation for Special Needs Learners 3 

SPED 431 Student Teaching Practicum Moderate 

Disabilities (PreK-8) 6 or 12 

or 

SPED 432 Student Teaching Moderate Disabilities (5-12) 

Total minimum credits: 27 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

BSE IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (TEACHER 
OF STUDENTS WITH SEVERE DISABILITIES 
-ALL LEVELS) 

Admission Requirements 

• Candidates are enrolled in two majors, special education and 
an arts and sciences major. 

• Candidates must meet School of Education and Allied 
Studies Professional Education Program admission require- 
ments that include, but are not limited to, passage of the 
Communication and Literacy portion of the Massachusetts 
Tests for Educator Licensure^ (MTEL) and an undergraduate 
GPA of 2.8 (with "C+" or better in ENGL 101 and ENGL 102) 
prior to enrolling in SPED 300 or 400 level course work. 

Program Requirements 

• In consultation with advisers, undertake appropriate course 
work and activities. 

• Candidates must complete appropriate core curriculum and 
arts and sciences requirements. 



• Candidates must submit evidence that they have passed the 
General Curriculum MTEL S prior to the student teaching 
experience. 

Licensure Requirements Credits 

*SPED 202 Introduction to Special Education 3 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 3 

COMD 290 Language Acquisition and Development 3 

SPED 302 Principles and Application of Behavioral 

Management for the Special Needs Learner 3 

SPED 303 Principles and Procedures of Assessment of Special 

Needs Learners 3 

SPED 402 Children with Reading Disability: Diagnosis and 

Teaching Strategies 3 

SPED 410 Instructional and Curricular Strategies for Learners 

with Intensive Special Needs 1 3 

SPED 411 Instructional and Curricular Strategies for Learners 

with Intensive Special Needs II 3 

SPED 433 Student Teaching - Severe Disabilities 6 or 12 

Total minimum credits: 30 

• To be completed prior to admission to professional education 
and enrollment in upper-division education courses. 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 

BSE ELEMENTARY EDUCATION/MEd 
SPECIAL EDUCATION (TEACHER OF 
STUDENTS WITH MODERATE DISABILITIES 
PreK-8) DUAL LICENSURE 5-YEAR 
PROGRAM 

The Dual License Program is a joint program between the 
Department of Elementary and Early Childhood Education 
and the Department of Special Education and Communication 
Disorders. 

The Dual License Program is a five-year program that leads 
to both a BSE in Elementary Education with Initial License in 
Elementary Education and an MEd in Special Education with 
endorsement for Initial License as a Teacher of Students with 
Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8). 

The purpose of the program is to develop special education 
teachers who have an in-depth understanding of special educa- 
tion and the elementary school classroom. 

Undergraduate Program Requirements 

• Students must complete a Liberal Arts or Sciences major. 
The following courses are required to complete the BSE 
Elementary Education/MEd Special Education Dual Licensure 
five-year program: 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Special Education and 
Communication Disorders 



Cognate Requirements Credits 

ENGL 254 Literature for Elementary Education Majors 3 

GEOG 151 Human Geography 3 

HIST 131 World History to 1500 3 

HIST 221 United States History and Constitutions to 1865 3 

MATH 107 Principles of Mathematics 1 3 

POL1 172 Introduction to American Government 3 

PSYC 224 Child Psychology 3 

or 

ELED120 Child Study in Early Childhood and Elementary 
Classroom 

Note: Some of the required courses listed above also fulfill 
certain core curriculum requirements 

Additional undergraduate program requirements 

*SPED 202 Introduction to Special Education 3 

ELED 310 Teaching Science and Social Studies in the 

Elementary School 3 

ELED 330 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School 3 

ELED 340 Teaching Language Arts in the Elementary 

School (Writing Intensive in the Major Core Curriculum 

Requirement-CWRM) 3 

ELED 350 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary School 3 

ELED 360 Teaching in a Standards-Based Inclusive 

Elementary Classroom 3 

or 

SPED 217 Meeting the Needs of all Learners 
ELED 492 Supervised Teaching in Public Schools: 

Elementary 6 

SPED 404 Student Teaching Practicum: Inclusion 

Program (PreK-8) 6 



* To be completed prior to admission to professional education 
and enrollment in upper-division education courses. 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



Graduate Program Requirements 

Students must complete the following courses 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

SPED 501 Professional Practices in Special Education 3 

SPED 504 Applied Curriculum Development for Learners with 

Special Needs: PreK-8 3 

SPED 517 Language Skills for Special Needs Learners 3 

SPED 518 Reading Strategies in Special Education 3 

SPED 530 Assessment Procedures in Special Education 3 

SPED 550 Seminar in Special Education 3 

SPED 560 Teaching Students with Special Needs 

through Direct/Explicit Instruction 3 

SPED 575 Behavior Interventions in Special Education 3 

SPED 594 Practicum: Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8) 6 or 12 



Total minimum credits: 84 



MINOR IN INCLUSIVE PRACTICES 
IN SPECIAL EDUCATION AND 
COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 

Admission Requirements 

• To declare a minor in Inclusive Practices in Special Education 
and Communication Disorders, the candidate must com- 
plete a "Declaration of Minor" card through the Academic 
Achievement Center. The adviser is the Department of 
Special Education and Communication 

Disorders chairperson. 

• Students declaring the minor in Inclusive Practices in Special 
Education and Communication Disorders should contact 
the chairperson of the Department of Special Education and 
Communication Disorders to develop a program plan. 

Required Course Work 

SPED 202 Introduction to Special Education 3 

or 

SPED 21 1 The Early Childhood Learner with Special Needs 
SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 3 

Electives 

Choose one course (three credits) from the following 3 

ECED 230 The Basics of Early Childhood Education 

EDHM 210 Introduction to Teaching 

ELED 220 Introduction to Elementary Education 
Choose one course (three credits) from the following 3 

EDHM 235 Learning and Motivation 

ELED 120 Child Study in the Early Childhood and 
Elementary Education Classroom 

PSYC 224 Child Psychology 

PSYC 226 Adolescent Psychology 

PSYC 227 Development through the Life Cycle 
Choose two courses (six credits) from the following 6 

COMD 220 Introduction to Communication Sciences 
and Disorders 

COMD 231 Sign Language I 

COMD 290 Language Acquisition and Development 
Disabilities 

COMD 312 Language Disorders in Children 

SPED 217 Meeting the Needs of All Learners' 

Total minimum credits: 18 



MINOR IN PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES 
IN SPECIAL EDUCATION AND 
COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 

Admission Requirements 

• To declare a minor in professional practices in special educa- 
tion and communication disorders, the candidate must com- 
plete a "Declaration of Minor" card through the Academic 
Achievement Center. The adviser is the Department of Special 
Education and Communication Disorders chairperson 

• Students declaring the minor should contact the chairperson 
of the Department of Special Education and Communication 
Disorders to develop a program plan. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



211 



Special Education and 
Communication Disorders 



bSc 



BRIDGEVAThR 
STATE OGUBG1 



• Candidates for the minor in professional practices in special 
education and communication disorders must meet the 
School of Education and Allied Studies Professional Education 
Program admission requirements that include, but are not lim 
ited to, passage of the Communication and Literacy portion of 
the Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure*" (MTEL) and 
an undergraduate GPAof 2.8 (with "C + " or better in ENGL 
101 and ENGL 1 02) prior to enrolling in SPED 300- or 400- 
level course work. 

Credits 

Required course work 6 

SPED 202 Introduction to Special Education 
or 

SPED 21 1 The Early Childhood Learner with Special Needs 
SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 

Required professional practices course 

work 6 

SPED 302 Principles and Application of Behavioral Management 

for the Special Needs Learner 
SPED 303 Principles and Procedures of Assessment of Special 

Needs Learners 

Electives 6 

A maximum of three credits may be taken from the 
following 

ECED 230 The Basics of Early Childhood Education 

EDHM 210 Introduction to Teaching 

ELED 220 Introduction to Elementary Education 
A maximum of three credits may be taken 
from the following 

EDHM 235 Learning and Motivation 

ELED 120 Child Study in the Early Childhood and Elementary 
Education Classroom 

PSYC 224 Child Psychology 

PSYC 226 Adolescent Psychology 

PSYC 227 Development though the Life Cycle 

Six credits may be taken from the following 

COMD 231 Sign Language I 
COMD 290 Language Acquisition and Development 
COMD 312 Language Disorders in Children 
SPED 217 Meeting the Needs of All Learners 

Total minimum credits: 18 



COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 

Program Coordinator: Dr. Sandra Ciocci 

The department offers a preprofessional program in communica- 
tion disorders for students interested in preparation for graduate 
study in speech-language pathology and/or audiology. 

Specific information is available from the Department of 
Special Education and Communication Disorders. Contact Dr. 
Sandra Ciocci at 508.53 1 .2628 or sciocci@bridgew.edu. 

CONCENTRATION IN COMMUNICATION 
DISORDERS 

The minimum requirements for the communication 

disorders concentration include the following. Credits 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 3 

COMD 220 Introduction to Communication Sciences 

and Disorders 3 

COMD 281 Speech Anatomy and Physiology 1 

COMD 282 Speech and Hearing Science J 

COMD 290 Language Acquisition and Development 3 

COMD 294 Phonetics ..I 

COMD 312 Language Disorders in Children 3 

COMD 313 Phonology and Articulation Disorders 3 

COMD 351 Introduction to Audiology 3 

COMD 393 Aural Rehabilitation 3 

COMD 480 Clinical Procedures: An Overview 3 

Elective (choose one) 3 

COMD 325 Voice Disorders in Children and Adults 
or 

COMD 381 Neurological Bases of Speech and Language 
Required Cognates 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle 3 

ENGL 323 Introduction to Linguistics 3 

Once a student declares communication disorders as a con- 
centration, he or she will be screened for adequate speech and 
language patterns to assure appropriate modeling of speech 
by therapists. Appropriate recommendations will be made for 
improvement, which the student will be required to follow if he 
or she wishes to pursue a practicum program sequence. 

Total minimum credits: 42 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Special Education and 
Communication Disorders 



BR1DGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



MINOR IN COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 

Credits 



COMD 220 Introduction to Communication Disorders 3 

COMD 281 Speech Anatomy and Physiology 3 

COMD 282 Speech and Hearing Science 3 

COMD 290 Language Acquisition and Development 3 

COMD 294 Phonetics 3 

COMD 351 Introduction to Audiology 3 



Total minimum credits: 18 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Graduate Program Coordinator: Dr. Kenneth Dobush 

At the graduate level the Department of Special Education and 
Communication Disorders offers several programs designed 
to meet the needs of graduate students. Contact Dr. Kenneth 
Dobush at 508. 531 .2270 or kdobush@bridgew.edu for specific 
information. An additional resource is located on Blackboard at 
www.bridgew.edu. Username and password: guestapp. 

For information regarding graduate program application 
procedures and admission standards, students should consult the 
"School of Graduate Studies" section of this catalog. 

Students seeking initial licensure should consult the section of 
this catalog entitled "School of Education and Allied Studies" for 
professional education admission and retention information and 
important institutional deadlines. 

Candidates who have enrolled in appropriate course work 
prior to admission are limited in the number of credits (six) that 
can be applied to their degree. Therefore, candidates are urged 
to complete the application for graduate admissions as soon as 
possible. For details regarding transfer credit consult the "School 
of Graduate Studies" section of this catalog. 



POSTBACCALAUREATE INITIAL LICENSURE 
PROGRAMS 

• Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities 
(PreK-8or5-12) 

• Teacher of Students with Severe Disabilities (all levels) 



POSTBACCALAUREATE PROGRAM 
-TEACHER OF STUDENTS WITH MODERATE 
DISABILITIES (PreK-8, 5-12) (INITIAL 
LICENSURE) 

Admission Requirements 

• Candidates must meet all School of Graduate Studies add- 
mission requirements and have a minimum undergraduate 
GPAof2.8 

• Candidates must submit evidence of passing the 
Communication and Literacy Skills Massachusetts Tests for 
Educator Licensure® (MTEL) 



• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

Program Requirements 

In consultation with an adviser, undertake appropriate course 
work and activities including the following. 

• Candidates must complete SPED 202 or SPED 510, or an 
equivalent introductory class in special education. 

• PreK-8 Candidates must, prior to the student 
teaching experience: 

a) complete an appropriate psychology course 
(either PSYC 224 or PSYC 227 or equivalent) 

b) have passed the General Curriculum MTEL® 

c) complete SPED 402 Children with Reading Disabilities 
or SPED 509 Teaching Reading to Learners with 
Disabilities (or equivalent). 

• 5-12 Candidates must, prior to the student teaching expe- 
rience: 

a) complete an appropriate psychology course 
(PSYC 227 or equivalent) 

b) have either passed a subject content MTEL® 
or the General Curriculum MTEL® 

c) complete SPED 402 Children with Reading Disabilities 
(or equivalent). 

• Candidates will also be required to pass the Foundations 
of Reading MTEL® prior to licensure. 

Credits 

Cognate Requirement 3 

PreK-8 candidates must complete 
PSYC 224 Child Psychology 
or 

PSYC 227 Devleopment Through the Life Cycle or equivalent 
5-12 candidates must complete 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle or equivalent 



Degree/Licensure Requirement 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

Licensure Requirements 

SPED 508 Strategies for Diversity 3 

SPED 530 Assessment Procedures in Special Education 3 

SPED 575 Behavioral Intervention in Special Education 3 

SPED 501 Professional Practices in Special Education 3 

SPED 504 Applied Curriculum Development for Learners 

with Special Needs (PreK-8) 3 

or 



SPED 505 Applied Curriculum Development or Learners 
with Special Needs (5-12) 
SPED 594 Practicum: Moderate Disabilities 

(PreK-8) (six credits) 6 

or 

SPED 595 Practicum: Moderate Disabilities (5-12) 
(six or 12 credits) 

Total minimum credits: 21 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



213 



Special Education and 
Communication Disorders 



POSTBACCALAUREATE PROGRAM 
- TEACHER OF STUDENTS WITH 
SEVERE DISABILITIES (ALL LEVELS) 
(INITIAL LICENSURE) 

Admission Requirements 

• Candidates must meet all School of Graduate Studies add- 
mission requirements and have a minimum undergraduate 
GPA of 2.8. 

• Candidates must submit evidence that they have passed the 
Communication and Literacy Skills Massachusetts Tests for 
Educator Licensure" (MTEL). 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

Program Requirements 

In consultation with an adviser, undertake appropriate course 
work and activities including the following: 

• Candidates must complete SPED 202 or SPED 510 (or equiva- 
lent), an introductory class in special education. 

• Candidates must complete SPED 402 Children with Reading 
Disabilities or SPED 509 Teaching Reading to Learners with 
Disabilities (or equivalent) prior to enrollment in SPED 524. 

• Candidates must complete an appropriate developmental 
psychology course. 

• Candidates must submit evidence that they have passed 
the General Curriculum MTEL® prior to the practicum 
experience. 



Degree Requirement Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

Licensure Requirements 

SPED 501 Professional Practices in Special Education 3 

SPED 508 Strategies for Diversity 3 

SPED 517 Language Skills for Special Needs Learners 3 

SPED 530 Assessment Procedures in Special Education 3 

SPED 575 Behavioral Intervention in Special Education 3 

SPED 524 Curriculum Development for Learners with 

Severe Disabilities 1 3 

SPED 525 Curriculum Development for Learners with 

Severe Disabilities II 3 

SPED 593 Practicum: Severe Disabilities 6 or 12 



Total minimum credits: 28 



MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL 
EDUCATION 

• MEd in Special Education (Initial Licensure, Teacher of 
Students with Moderate Disabilities, PreK-8 or 5-12 ) for 
Elementary and Early Childhood Education Teachers 

• MEd in Special Education (Partial Fulfillment of Professional 
Licensure, Teacher of Students with Moderate Disabilities, 
PreK-8 or 5-12) 

• MEd in Special Education (Initial Licensure, Teacher of 
Students with Moderate Disabilities, PreK-8) for Elementary 
and Early Childhood Education Teachers 



• MEd in Special Education (Dual Licensure BSE and MEd) 
Moderate Disabilities and Elementary Education 

• MEd in Special Education (Initial Licensure, Teacher of 
Students with Severe Disabilities, all levels) 

• MEd in Special Education (Non-licensure) 



MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL 
EDUCATION MODERATE DISABILITIES 
(PreK-8 or 5-12) (INITIAL LICENSURE) 

Admission Requirements 

• Candidates must meet all School of Graduate Studies 
requirements and have a minimum undergraduate GPA 

of 2.8. 

• Candidates must submit evidence that they have passed the 
Communication and Literacy Skills Massachusetts Tests for 
Educator Licensure* (MTEL). 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 

Program Requirements 

• Candidates must complete SPED 202 or SPED 510, or an 
equivalent introductory class in special education. 

• PreK-8 Candidates must, prior to the student 
teaching experience: 

a) complete an appropriate psychology course 
(either PSYC 224 or PSYC 227 or equivalent) 

b) have passed the General Curriculum MTEL® 

c) complete SPED 402 Children with Reading Disabilities (or 
equivalent). 

• 5-12 Candidates must, prior to the student teaching expe- 
rience: 

a) complete an appropriate psychology course 

(PSYC 227 or equivalent) 

b have either passed a subject content MTEL® 

or the General Curriculum MTEL® 

c) complete SPED 402 Children with Reading Disabilities or 

SPED509 Teaching Reading to Learners with Disabilities (or 

equivalent). 

• All candidates are required to pass the Foundations 
of Reading MTEL® prior to licensure. 

Credits 

Cognate Requirement 3 

PreK-8 candidates must complete: 
PSYC 224 Child Psychology 
or 

PSYC 227 Devleopment Through the Life Cycle 
or equivalent 
5-12 candidates must complete: 

PSYC 227 Development Through the Life Cycle or equivalent 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Special Education and 
Communication Disorders 



bJsc 



BRIDGE WATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Degree Requirements 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

Licensure Requirements 

SPED 508 Strategies for Diversity 3 

SPED 530 Assessment Procedures in Special Education 3 

SPED 575 Behavioral Intervention in Special Education 3 

SPED 501 Professional Practices in Special Education 3 

SPED 504 Applied Curriculum Development for 

Learners with Special Needs: PreK-8 3 

or 

SPED 505 Applied Curriculum Development for Learners with 
Special Needs: 5-12 

SPED 594 Practicum: Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8) 6 or 12 

or 

SPED 595 Practicum: Moderate Disabilities (5-12) 

Additional Degree Requirements 

EDMC 530 Teacher as Researcher 3 

SPED 517 Language Skills for Special Needs Learners 3 

SPED 518 Reading Strategies in Special Education 3 

SPED 560 Teaching Students with Special Needs 

Through Direct/Explicit Instruction 3 

SPED 550 Seminar in Special Education 3 



Total minimum credits: 37* 
Degree requirements include a minimum of 37 approved gradu- 
ate credits and the successful completion of the comprehensive 
examination. 

* On a case-by-case basis an individual course may be waived to 
bring the minimum number of credits to 3 1 . 



Program Requirements 

• Candidates must complete SPED 202 or SPED 510, or an 
equivalent introductory class in special education. 

• Candidates must, prior to the student teaching experience, 
complete the appropriate course work listed below. 



Degree Requirement Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

Licensure Requirements 

SPED 508 Strategies for Diversity 3 

SPED 530 Assessment Procedures in Special Education 3 

SPED 575 Behavior Interventions in Special Education 3 

SPED 501 Professional Practices in Special Education 3 

SPED 504 Applied Curriculum Development for 

Learners with Special Needs: PreK-8 3 

SPED 594 Practicum: Moderate Disabilities (PreK-8) 6 

Additional Degree Requirements 

EDMC 530 Teacher as Researcher 3 

SPED 517 Language Skills for Special Needs Learners 3 

SPED 518 Reading Strategies in Special Education 3 

SPED 560 Teaching Students with Special Needs 

Through Direct/Explicit Instruction 3 

SPED 550 Seminar in Special Education 3 



Total minimum credits: 37* 
Degree requirement includes a minimum of 37 approved 
graduate credits and the successful completion of the 
comprehensive examination. 

* On a case-by-case basis an individual course may be waived to 
bring the minimum number of credits to 34. 



MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL 
EDUCATION MODERATE DISABILITIES 
(PreK-8) FOR ELEMENTARY/EARLY 
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION TEACHERS 
(INITIAL LICENSURE) 

This program is intended for teachers who hold an elementary 
or early childhood education initial license and is designed to 
provide them with: 

• An initial license as a teacher of students with moderate dis- 
abilities, PreK-8, and 

• A Master of Education in Special Education, which fulfills 
the course work requirements for professional licensure in 
elementary or early childhood education. 

Admission Requirements 

• Candidates must meet all School of Graduate Studies admis- 
sion requirements. 

• Candidates must submit evidence of Massachusetts 
Elementary or Early Childhood Education Initial Teacher 
License. 

• Candidates must submit official transcripts of all undergradu- 
ate and graduate course work. 



MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL 
EDUCATION SEVERE DISABILITIES 
(ALL LEVELS) (INITIAL LICENSURE) 

Admission Requirements 

• Candidates must meet all graduate admissions office require- 
ments and have a minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.8. 

• Candidates must submit evidence that they have passed 
the Communication and Literacy Skills portion of the 
Massachusetts Tests for Educator Licensure® (MTEL). 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course 
work. 

Program Requirements 

In consultation with an adviser, appropriate course work and 
activities must include the following: 

• Candidates must complete SPED 202 or SPED 510 or an 
equivalent introductory class in special education. 

• Candidates must complete SPED 402 Children with Reading 
Disabilities or SPED 509 Teaching Reading to Learners with 
Reading Disabilities (or equivalent) prior to enrollment in 
SPED 524. 

• Candidates must have completed an appropriate develop- 
mental psychology course. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



215 



Special Education and 
Communication Disorders 



bSc 

MM ll.i.l «AMH 



MM J ( oil K.I 



• Candidates must submit evidence that they have passed the 
General Curriculum MTEL* prior to the internship practicum 
experience. 



Degree Requirement Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

License Requirements 

SPED 508 Strategies for Diversity 3 

SPED 517 Language Skills Special Needs Learners 3 

SPED 530 Assessment Procedures in Special Education 3 

SPED 575 Behavior Interventions in Special Education 3 

SPED 524 Curriculum Development for Learners with 

Severe Disabilities 1 3 

SPED 525 Curriculum Development for Learners with 

Severe Disabilities II 3 

SPED 593 Practicum: Severe Disabilities 6 or 12 

Additional Degree Requirements 

EDMC 530 Teacher as Researcher 3 

SPED 560 Teaching Students with Special Needs 

Through Direct/Explicit Instruction 3 

SPED 550 Seminar in Special Education 3 



Total minimum credits: 34* 
Degree requirement includes a minimum of 34 approved 
graduate credits and the successful completion of the 
comprehensive examination. 

* On a case-by-case basis, an individual course may be waived to 
bring the minimum number of credits to 3 1 . 



MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL 
EDUCATION (NON-LICENSURE) 

This program is designed for students who wish to earn a 
master's degree in special education. This program does not lead 
to licensure. 

Admission Requirements 

• Candidates who have enrolled in appropriate course work 
prior to admission are limited in the number of credits six 
that can be applied to their degree. Therefore, candidates are 
urged to complete the application for graduate admissions as 
soon as possible. For details regarding transfer credit, consult 
the "School of Graduate Studies" section of this catalog. 

• All candidates must submit evidence that they have passed 
the Communication and Literacy Skills Massachusetts Tests 
for Educator Licensure 1 (MTEL) or have earned an accept- 
able score on the Graduate Record Examination 

as a criterion for admission. 

• Candidates must meet all School of Graduate Studies admis- 
sion requirements and have a minimum undergraduate GPA 
of 2.8. 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work 



Program Requirements 

In consultation with an adviser, appropriate course work and 
activities must include the following. 

Candidates must complete SPED 202 or SPED 510 or an 



equivalent introductory course in special education. 

Degree Requirements Credits 

GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

Required Education Course 

EDMC 530 The Teacher as Researcher 3 

Required Special Education Courses 

SPED 501 Professional Practices in Special Education 3 



SPED 504 Applied Curriculum Development for Learners 

with Special Needs PreK-8 

or 

SPED 505 Applied Curriculum Development for Learners 



with Special Needs: 5-12 
SPED 522 The Inclusion Classroom: Philosophy and 

Implementation 3 

SPED 530 Assessment Procedures Special Education 3 

SPED 560 Teaching Students with Special Needs 

through Direct/Explicit Instruction 3 

SPED 575 Behavior Interventions in Special Education 3 

SPED 550 Seminar in Special Education 3 

SPED 555 Field Experience in Special Education 

(only for those without special education experience) 3 

Elective(s) as determined with an adviser 

Suggested electives include, but are not limited to, 
the following: 

SPED 508 Strategies for Diversity 3 

SPED 51 7 Language Skills for Special Needs Learners 3 

SPED 518 Reading Strategies in Special Education 3 

SPED 520 Topics in Special Education 3 



Total minimum credits: 34 
Degree requirements include a minimum of 3 1 approved gradu- 
ate credits and successful completion of either written or oral 
comprehensive examination. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



Special Education and 
Communication Disorders 



BSC 

BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECIAL 
EDUCATION - MODERATE DISABILITIES 
(PreK-8 OR 5-12) (PROFESSIONAL 
LICENSURE) 

This program is a degree program for partial fulfillment of 
Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary 
Education professional licensure requirements. 

Admission Requirements 

• Candidates must meet all School of Graduate Studies admis- 
sion requirements and have a minimum undergraduate GPA 
of 2.8. 

• Candidates must submit evidence of Massachusetts Special 
Education Initial Teacher License. 

• Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
course work. 

Program Requirements 

In consultation with an adviser, undertake appropriate course 
work and activities. 

Note: Candidates who have enrolled in appropriate course work 
prior to admission are limited in the number of credits (six) that 
can be applied to their degree. Therefore, candidates are urged 
to complete the application for graduate admissions as soon as 
possible. For details regarding transfer credit, consult the "School 
of Graduate Studies" section of this catalog. 

Degree Requirements Credits 
GRPP 501 Graduate Program Planning 1 

Professional Content Core 15 

Appropriate content based course work as determined with an 
adviser; course work in reading and/or other areas within the arts 
and sciences. 

Professional Discipline Core 

EDMC 530 Teacher as Researcher 3 

SPED 550 Seminar in Special Education 3 

SPED 560 Teaching Students with Special Needs 

Through Direct/Explicit Instruction 3 

SPED 518 Advanced Reading Strategies in Special Education.... 3 

Electives 

As determined with an adviser; suggested electives 

include, but are not limited to, the following 3 

SPED 517 Language Skills for Special Needs Learners 
SPED 522 The Inclusion Classroom 

Total minimum credits: 31 
Degree requirements include a minimum of 31 approved gradu- 
ate credits and the successful completion of the comprehensive 
examination. 



COMMUNICATION DISORDERS 
CONCENTRATION 

The graduate-level concentration in communication disorders is 
presently inactive. For further information, contact the communi- 
cation disorders program coordinator. 

CONCENTRATION IN BILINGUAL SPECIAL 
EDUCATION 

The concentration in bilingual special education is presently 
inactive. For further information, contact the special education 
program coordinator. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/ as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



217 



Interdisciplinary and 
Preprofessional Programs 



ACTUARIAL SCIENCE MINOR 

This interdisciplinary minor, drawing from both high-level 
mathematics courses and finance courses, is ideally suited for 
mathematics majors or accounting and finance majors who are 
interested in preparing for the actuarial science exam and in pur- 
suing and actuarial career or a career in a related area. 

Credits 



ACFI 100 Fundamentals of Financial Reporting 3 

ACFI 200 Financial Accounting 3 

ACFI 385 Managerial Finance 3 

MATH 151 Calculus 1 3 

MATH 152 Calculus II 3 

MATH 251 Calculus III 3 

Choose one course from the following 3 

ACFI 476 Insurance and Risk Management 

ACFI 490 Investments 

MATH 403 Probability Theory 



Note: Accounting and finance majors may nof choose 
ACFI 476 or ACFI 490 to satisfy the minor requirements. 
Mathematics majors may nof choose MATH 403 to satisfy 
the minor requirements. 

Total minimum credits: 21 
For further information, interested students should contact Dr. 
Shannon Donovan of the Department of Accounting and Finance 
or Professor Richard Quindley of the Department of Mathematics 
and Computer Science. 



AMERICAN STUDIES MINOR 

Designed to complement the student's major, this minor program 
examines the development of American society and culture from 
several perspectives. It features a study of the United States 
through a combination of relevant courses in a variety of aca- 
demic areas: history, literature, art and architecture, philosophy, 
religion, political science and others. Through this interdisciplin- 
ary focus, the minor encourages an integrated and inclusive 
sense of the American experience. 

The area around Bridgewater is rich in library and museum 
resources for American studies. In addition to the holdings of 
Boston-area colleges and universities, there are the collections 
of the Massachusetts Historical Society, the Pilgrim Museum, 
Plimouth Plantation, the Whaling Museum in New Bedford, 
Fuller Museum of Art, the Boston and Providence Athenaeums, 
the John Carter Brown Library and the Harris Collection at 
Brown University. Bridgewater itself has the Microbook Library of 
American Civilization and the PCMI humanities collection. 

A student wishing to pursue a minor in American studies will 
ordinarily be assigned an adviser from the American Studies 
Committee, and will be expected to take the following sequence 
of courses in the sophomore, junior and senior years: 



Required Courses Credits 

INTD 220 Introduction to American Studies 3 

INTD 420 American Studies Seminar 3 

Elective Courses 



In consultation with an American studies adviser, the student 
will choose a group of at least four additional courses in fields 
related to the program. Most likely these courses will be spread 
over the junior and senioryears. At least two of these additional 
courses must be chosentrom disciplines outside the student's 

major 12 

Total minimum credits: 18 
For further information, interested students should contact the 
Department of English. 

ASIAN STUDIES MINOR 

Credits 

Choose any six of the following courses in at least 

two academic departments 18 

ANTH 216 Peoples and Cultures of the Near East 

ARTH 205 Asian Art Survey: India, China, and Japan 

ARTH 208 Survey of Islamic Art and Architecture 

COMM 365 Introduction to Intercultural Communication 

COMM 462 Patterns of Intercultural Communication 

ENGL 253 Non-Western Literature 

GEOG 374 Geography of the Middle East 

GEOG 375 Geography of South Asia 

GEOG 376 Geography of East Asia 

HIST 151 Asian Civilization 

HIST 473 Asian-American History 

HIST 474 Islamic Civilization to 1400 

HIST 475 The Modern Middle East 

HIST 480 History of Imperial China 

HIST 481 China under Communism 

HIST 482 History of Modern Japan 

HIST 483 South Asia: The Modern Period 

HIST 484 War and Revolution in Modern Asia 

LAAR 101 Elementary Arabic I 

LAAR 102 Elementary Arabic II 

LACH 101 Elementary Chinese I 

LACH 102 Elementary Chinese II 

LAJA 101 Elementary Japanese I 

LAJA 102 Elementary Japanese II 

LAJA 151 Intermediate Japanese 

LAJA 172 Business Japanese 

PHIL 212 Philosophies of India 

PHIL 213 Philosophies of China and Japan 

POLI 330 Asian Politics 

PSYC 200 Non-Western Theories of Personality 
SOCI 214 Middle Eastern Societies 
SOCI 217 East Asian Societies: China and Japan 
SOCI 218 Chinese Society and Culture 
THEA 222 Asian Theater 

* First- and second-year seminars relating to Asia may be peti- 
tioned to be substituted for an Asian studies minor course. 
Study tours to Asia offered in history, art history, sociology, 



218 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 



BR1DGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



Interdisciplinary and 
Preprofessional Programs 



theater, geography and management departments vary in spe- 
cial numbers. Courses taken from exchange institutions can be 
counted for up to half of the residency; for example, three out 
of six minor requirements. 

Note: At least half of the minor (nine credits) must be completed 
at Bridgewater State College. 

Total minimum credits: 18 
For further information, contact Dr. Wing-kai To in the History 
Department. 

CANADIAN STUDIES MINOR 

The minor has been developed as an area study in response to 
faculty, student and regional interest. The national origins of a 
large portion of the population of Southeastern Massachusetts 
reflect strong Canadian ties from both the French and English 
communities. 

The program is designed to supplement and give a multi- 
cultural dimension to one's major by an in-depth study of our 
northern neighbor. The study is presented in the following aca- 
demic areas: history, literature, geography, management, music, 
economics, sociology and political science. 

Students may enter the Canadian studies minor during the 
sophomore or junior year and will be assigned an adviser in 
their major field, usually a member of the College Council for 
Canadian Studies. 

Credits 

INTD 200 Introduction to Canadian Studies 3 

Three courses with at least one from each area 9 

A) Area of literature and history 

ENGL 251 Literary Themes: Canadian Literature and 

National Identity 
HIST 487 Canadian History to Confederation 
HIST 488 Canadian History since Confederation 
HIST 489 History of Canadian-American Relations 
HIST 494 Quebec and Canada since 1867 

B) Area of geography and political science 
GEOG 386 Geography of Canada 

POLI 370 Canadian Foreign Policy: Actors and Issues 
POLI 377 Canadian-American Political Relations 
Two electives, one from each of the following two groups 

A) One course selected from the following 3 

ANTH 206 Native Cultures in North America 
ANTH 328 Archaeology of North America 
ARTH 135-136 Freshman Honors Colloquium 

(when Canadian art is included) 
CRJU 399 Special Topic in Criminal Justice: Youth Offenders - 

Canada/U.S. 
ENGL 251 Literary Themes: Canadian Literature 

and National Identity 
GEOG 386 Geography of Canada 
HIST 487 Canadian History to Confederation 
HIST 488 Canadian History since Confederation 
HIST 489 History of Canadian-American Relations 
HIST 491 Medicine and Society in the North Atlantic World 
HIST 494 Quebec and Canada since 1867 
LAFR 101 Elementary French I 



LAFR 102 Elementary French II 

SOCI 313 Family Violence (when Canada is included) 

B) One course selected from the following 3 

BIOL 117 Biological Environment: Canada 

ECON 302 The Canadian Economy: A Comparative 

Approach 
ECON 321 International Economics 

(when Canada is included) 
PHED/INTD 236 Games and Sport of Arctic People 
POLI 370 Canadian Foreign Policy: Actors and Issues 
POLI 377 Canadian-American Political Relations 
POLI 386 Canadian Politics 

Total minimum credits: 18 
Students in the minor are encouraged to have some familiarity 
with French. 

For further details contact Dr. Anthony Cicerone of the 
Department of Economics, telephone 508.531 .2421 .Web site: 
www.bridgew.edu/canada 

CHEMISTRY-GEOLOGY MAJOR 

A major in chemistry-geology is offered jointly by the Department 
of Chemical Sciences and the Department of Earth Sciences. This 
program is designed to prepare students for graduate school and 
professional employment in geochemistry and geology. Careers 
in these fields may involve environmental consulting, petroleum, 
mineral and groundwater exploration or research in geochronol- 
ogy, mineralogy, crystallography and oceanography. This major is 
particularly suited to students interested in chemical or geologi- 
cal oceanography. The program is flexible in that it allows the 
student to specialize in a variety of areas by suitable choice of 
electives. 

Chemistry-Geology Major (Leading to 

a BS in Chemistry and Geology) Credits 

CHEM 141 Chemical Principles I 4 

CHEM 142 Chemical Principles II 4 

EASC 100 Physical Geology 3 

EASC 101 Historical Geology 4 

EASC 260 Mineralogy 4 

EASC 450 Geochemistry 4 

Electives 

Two additional semesters of chemistry 6 

Two semesters of physics 6 

Two semesters of mathematics 6 

In addition to the above electives: six hours of chemistry, 
earth sciences, mathematics and/or physics (courses 

must be approved by the student's adviser) 6 

Total minimum credits: 47 

Core Curriculum Requirements 

A minimum of 1 20 earned hours is required for graduation. 
These earned hours include the core curriculum requirements 
as specified in the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" 
section of this catalog and at the Core Curriculum Web site, 
www.bridgew.edu/corecurriculum. For additional graduation 
requirements, see the "Undergraduate Academic Policies" 
section of this catalog. 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION AND ALLIED STUDIES 

Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda/asthaX information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



219 



Interdisciplinary and 
Preprofessional Programs 



The chemistry-geology major at Bndgewater State College is 
recognized by the New England Regional Student Program as an 
undergraduate four-year degree opportunity for residents of New 
England. Students who are legal residents of Connecticut, Maine, 
New Hampshire, Rhode Island or Vermont and are accepted 
for study in this major will pay the in state tuition rate plus sur- 
charge tuition. 



CIVIC EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY 
LEADERSHIP MINOR 

The civic education and community leadership minor consists of 
2 1 credit hours of course work designed to: 1 ) provide students 
with an interdisciplinary curriculum that promotes leadership and 
community service; 2) build on the college's service-learning mis- 
sion; and, 3) broaden campus efforts to build partnerships with 
local and state community organizations. The learning objec- 
tives associated with the minor include developing students' 
knowledge and understanding of civic leadership and community 
engagement, communication and advocacy, management and 
organizational behavior, local and regional affairs, economic 
development, politics and governance, and social justice and 
social change. 

Because interdisciplinary perspectives are necessary to solve 
most public policy problems, 1 2 different disciplines across the 
campus - anthropology, communication studies, economics, 
English, geography, history, management, philosophy, psychol- 
ogy, political science, social work and sociology - offer courses in 
the program. Students completing this minor will be assigned a 
faculty adviser from one of these departments. For further infor- 
mation, interested students should contact the coordinator of the 
minor, Dr. George Serra, Director of the Department of Political 
Science's Center for Legislative Studies. 

Requirements of the minor Credits 

Grade Requirement 

In addition to the requirements listed below, a grade of "C" or 
above is required in all courses applied toward the minor. 

Foundation course 

It is recommended that students complete the foundation course 
before completing the other components of the minor. 

Credits 

POLI 201 Citizenship and Community Leadership 3 

Experiential and Service Learning Course 3 

Any of the following courses will satisfy this requirement if: 1 ) a 
substantial portion of course content is related to issues pertain- 
ing to civic education and community leadership; and 2) the 
student has gained written approval from the chairperson of the 
department offering the course and the coordinator of the minor. 
Students should gain written approval prior to completing an 
experiential or service learning course to ensure that it will satisfy 
this requirement of the minor. 



POLI 498, COMM 498, ECON 498, ENGL 498, GEOG 498, HIST 
498, MGMT 498, PSYC 498, SCWK 498, SOCI 498 

or 

Any course other than POLI 201 that contains a substantial 
service learning component. Students should consult with their 
faculty adviser for the minor to identify such courses. 

Area Requirements 15 

Students must take one course (three credits) from each of 
the following areas. A special topics course or a directed study 
offered by any of the departments listed below will satisfy an 
area requirements if 1) a significant portion of course content is 
related to the area requirement and 2) the student has gained 
prior approval from the chairperson of the department offering 
the course and the coordinator of the minor. Students should 
gain written approval prior to completing a special topics course 
or a directed study to ensure that it will satisfy this requirement 
of the minor. 

In fulfilling the area requirements, students may not take more 
than two courses (six credits) from the same department, and at 
least three of the courses (nine credits) must be at the 300-400 
level. No course can count toward satisfying one of the area 
requirements and the experiential and service-learning require- 
ment listed above; students must choose whether they want a 
course to satisfy an area requirement or the experiential and 
service learning requirement. 

Communication and Advocacy 

COMM 226 Introduction to Public Relations 
COMM 360 Argumentation and Advocacy 
COMM 365 Introduction to Intercultural Communication 
ENGL 200 Personal and Public Writing 
ENGL 201 Technical Writing I 
ENGL 202 Business Communication 
ENGL 302 Technical Writing II 
ENGL 396 Rhetoric and Style 
Leadership, Management and Organizations 

ECON 375 Labor Economics 
ECON 430 Managerial Economics 
HIST 462 American Labor History 
MGMT 130 Principles of Management 
MGMT 140 Human Resources Management 
MGMT 303 Organizational Behavior 
MGMT 340 Contemporary Employee Relations 
MGMT 375 Personnel Development 
POLI 279 Introduction to Public Administration 
POLI 399 Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector 
POLI 495 Administrative Law and Regulation 
PSYC 313 Industrial and Organizational Psychology 
SOCI 332 Sociology of Organizations 
Local and Regional Affairs 

ANTH 426 Seminar: New England Ethnic and Regional 

Communities 
ECON 350 Urban Economic Problems and Policies 
GEOG 353 Urban Geography 
GEOG 462 Principles of Urban Planning 
GEOG 463 Applications in Urban Planning 
HIST 464 New England Textile Communities: Social and 

Economic History 



220 



INTERDISCIPLINARY AND PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 



Interdisciplinary and 
Preprofessional Programs 



B<SC 



BRIDGEWATER 
STATE COLLEGE 



POLI 277 American Government: State and Local 

POLI 376 Urban Politics 

SOCI 206 Cities and People: Urban Sociology 

SOCI 426 Urban Enclaves 

Politics, Economics and Governance 

ANTH331 Political Anthropology 

ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics 

ECON 102 Principles of Macroeconomics 

GEOG 350 Economic Geography 

GEOG 355 Political Geography 

GEOG 431 Environmental Regulations 

HIST 443 United States History: The Early National Period 

PHIL 222 Philosophy of Law 

POLI/ECON 340 Law and Economics 

POLI 341 Constitutional Law and Politics: The Powers of 

Government 
POLI 372 Legislative Process and Procedure 
POLI 375 American Political Parties and Interest Groups 
POLI 380 Public Opinion and Mass Political Behavior 
POLI 390 Public Finance 
POLI 391 The American Presidency 
POLI 479 Public Policy 

POLI 495 Administrative Law and Regulation 

Social Justice and Social Change 

ANTH 1 1 5 Anthropology of Race, Class, and Gender 

ANTH 204 Global Human Issues 

ANTH 208 Anthropology of Women 

ANTH 305 Culture Change 

ANTH 319 Contemporary Native Americans 

ANTH 435 Seminar: Global Feminism 

GEOG 333 Geography of Environmental Justice 

HIST 453 United States History: Progressive Era 

HIST 465 African-American History 

HIST 466 Women in American History 

HIST 473 Asian-American History 

INTD 240 Critical Perspectives in Women's and Gender Studies 

PHIL 235 Human Rights and Human Liberties 

POLI 342 Constitutional Law and Politics: The First Amendment 

POLI 343 Constitutional Law and Politics: Liberty and Equality 

POLI 389 Racial Politics in the United States 

POLI 476 Women and Politics 

PSYC 310 Social Psychology 

SCWK 250 Introduction to Social Welfare 

SCWK 270 Social Work Issues of Diversity and Oppression 

SCWK 333 Social Work with the Aged and Their Families 

SCWK 350 Social Welfare Policy 

SCWK 415 Social Services in Alcohol and Substance Abuse 

SCWK 432 Social Work Practice with Communities 

and Organizations 
SOC1 103 Social Problems 
SOC1 104 Global Social Problems 
SOCI 207 Social Inequality 
SOCI 312 Discrimination and Prejudice 
SOCI 315 Race and Ethnicity in America 
SOCI 316 Social Movements 

Total minimum credits: 21 



DANCE MINOR 

The dance minor is an interdisciplinary program in the 
Departments of Theater and Dance and Movement Arts, Health 
Promotion and Leisure Studies. The objective is to give a solid lib- 
eral arts experience in the art of dance. The program includes the 
study of techniques of various styles of dance, dance history and 
theory, choreography and production. 



Required Courses Credits 

THEA/PHED 155 Dance Practicum (two semesters) 2 

THEA/PHED 251 Dance History 3 

THEA/PHED 255 Creative Dance 1 3 

THEA/PHED 256 Creative Dance II 3 

THEA/PHED 357 Dance Production Theory 2 

THEA/PHED 358 Dance Production Techniques 1 

PHED 154 Ballet ...2 

Required courses 

Choose one 1 

PHED 161 Folk Dance 

PHED 164 Square Dance 

PHED 168 Ballroom Dance 

PHED 268 Ballroom Dance II - Theory, Practice 
and Performance 
Choose six credits from the following 6 



PHED 237 Theory and Practice of Jazz Dance, Fall 
PHED 242 Theory and Practice of Ballet, Fall 
PHED 245 Theory and Practice of Ballet, Spring 
PHED 247 Theory and Practice of Jazz Dance, Spring 
PHED 248 Theory and Practice of Modern Dance, Fall 
PHED 249 Theory and Practice of Modern Dance, Spring 
THEA/PHED 259 Dance Repertory 
PHED 271 Theory and Practice of Tap Dance I 
MUSC 160 Music :A Listening Approach is recommended but 
not required 

Total minimum credits: 23 
( All activity courses completed in this minor count toward the 
minimum 1 20 degree credits required for graduation.) 



ETHNIC STUDIES MINOR 

Ethnic Studies is an interdisciplinary minor program addressing 
issues of racial and ethnic diversity in the United States. Courses 
are offered in the fields of literature, history, anthropology, soci- 
ology, social work, special education, among other disciplines. 
Focusing on both comparative and case studies of race and 
ethnicity, students examine issues of cultural identity from the 
perspectives of people of color and heritage cultures. By 
calling attention to discrimination, prejudice and other inequali- 
ties against racial and ethnic groups, this program seeks to con- 
tribute to the education of diversity and social justice in 
multicultural America. 

Students choose six courses ( 1 8 credits), of which at least two 
courses (six credits) must be from Group A: Comparative Study 
of Race and Ethnicity, and at least two courses (six credits) from 
Group B: Study of Racial and Ethnic Groups. Students may also 
choose to focus on one of the following areas - Native American 
studies, African-American studies, Latino and American studies, 



INTERDISCIPLINARY AND PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

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221 



Interdisciplinary and 
Preprofessional Programs 




Asian-American studies, and Irish-American studies - by taking 
four courses (1 2 credits) in a specific area under Group B plus 
two courses (six credits) under Group A. 

Group A: Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity 

ANTH 115 Anthropology of Race, Class, and Gender 
ANTH 315 Ethnic Experience in America 
ANTH 426 Seminar: New England Ethnic and 

Regional Communities 
COMM 300 Television, Minorities, and Cultural Diversity 
COMM 365 Introduction to Intercultural Communication 
CRJU 358 Race, Class, Crime and Justice 
ENGL 315 Ethnic American Literature 
HIST 461 American Immigration and Ethnicity 
LANG 300 Languages of the World 
SCWK 270 Social Work Issues of Diversity and Oppression 
SCWK 437 Social Work with Multicultural and 

Multiethnic Families 
SOCI 312 Discrimination and Prejudice 
SOCI 315 Race and Ethnicity in America 
SOCI 426 Urban Enclaves 

SPED 203 Cultural Diversity Issues in School and Society 
SPED 206 Special Education in a Diverse Society 

Group B: Study of Racial and Ethnic Groups 

• Native American Studies 

ANTH 120 First Nations: Global Indigenous People 
ANTH 206 Native Cultures of North America 
ANTH 319 Contemporary Native Americans 

• African Studies 

ARTH 207 Introduction to African Art 

ARTH 217 African-American Art 

ENGL 233 Introduction to the African-American Novel 

ENGL 317 African-American Literature I 

ENGL 318 African-American Literature II 

GEOG 388 Geography of Africa 

HIST 465 African-American History 

MUSC 162 Music in African Culture 

• Latino and Latin American Studies 
ANTH 213 Latin American Peoples and Cultures 
ANTH 215 The Caribbean 

ANTH 409 Mesoamerican Societies and Cultures 
ENGL 251 Literary Themes: Caribbean Literature 
GEOG 381 Geography of Latin America 
LASP 210 Latin American Poetry in Translation 
LASP 220 The Contemporary Latin American Novel in 

English Translation 
LASP 230 Contemporary Latin American Short Story 

in Translation 

• Asian-American Studies 

ENGL 315 Ethnic American Literature 

HIST 151 Asian Civilization 

HIST 473 Asian-American History 

SOCI 217 East Asian Societies: China and Japan 

THEA 222 Asian Theatre 

• Irish-American Studies 
ENGL 381 Irish Literature I 
ENGL 382 Irish Literature II 

INTD 216 Introduction to Irish-American Studies 



INTD 416 Irish-American Seminar 

SOCI 225 The Irish-American Experience 

Total minimum credits: 18 
For further information, contact Dr. Wmg-kai To in the 
Department of History. 



FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY MINOR 



Required Courses: Credits 

PSYC 269 Psychology of Criminal Behavior 3 

PSYC 370 Abnormal Psychology 3 

PSYC 474 Forensic Psychology 3 

PSYC 494 Clinical Practicum: Forensic Psychology 3 

SOCI 228 Criminology 3 

Select one course from the following electives 3 

CRJU/SOCI 255 Juvenile Delinquency 

SOCI 310 Women and Crime 

SOCI 313 Family Violence 

CRJU/SOCI 334 White Collar Crime 

CRJU 354 Corrections 



Note: Only two courses may be counted toward the minor that 
have already been counted toward the student's major. 

Course Sequence 

PSYC 100 must be taken before any other PSYC course. 

PSYC 269 must be taken before PSYC 494. 

SOCI 328 must be taken before the SOCI elective is taken. 

Total minimum credits: 18 
For further information concerning the forensic psychology minor, 
contact Dr. Elizabeth Englander at eenglander@bridgew.edu or 
508.531.1385. 



HEALTH RESOURCES MANAGEMENT 
MINOR 

Students from relevant liberal arts and other related programs 
may elect this minor to develop the skills and background knowl- 
edge to gain employment at the entry level of health care deliv- 
ery management. This minor is most appropriate for students in 
the social sciences, social work, physical education, communica- 
tion studies, management and other human service-oriented 
professions. 



Required Courses Credits 

ACFI 100 Fundamentals of Financial Reporting 3 

HEAL 102 Health and Wellness 3 

HEAL/SCWK 403 Interdisciplinary Approaches to the 

Delivery of Health Services 3 

HEAL 430 Epidemiology and Community Health 3 

MGMT 130 Principles of Management 3 

MGMT 140 Human Resources Management 3 

Electives (choose one) 3 



ACFI 200 Financial Accounting 
ACFI 385 Managerial Finance 
HEAL 401 Human Sexuality 
HEAL 405 Drugs in Society 
HEAL 471 Nutrition 

HEAL 477 Environmental and Consumer Health 



222 



INTERDISCIPLINARY AND PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 



Interdisciplinary and 
Preprofessional Programs 



MGMT 200 Marketing Principles 

MGMT375 Personnel Development 
Students interested in the health resources management minor 
should contact Dr. Lydia Burak in the Department of Movement 
Arts, Health Promotion and Leisure Studies. 

Total minimum credits: 21 

IRISH-AMERICAN STUDIES MINOR 

The minor in Irish-American studies has been developed as an 
area of study in response to faculty, student and regional 
interest. The national origin of a large portion of the population 
of Southeastern Massachusetts reflects Irish and Irish- 
American ties. 

The program has been developed in collaboration with 
Massasoit Community College (MCC) and is designed to provide 
opportunities to learn about Irish immigration to America and the 
Irish-American experience. The minor is an integrated program 
involving anthropology, art, history, literature, popular culture 
and sociology. 

Students may pursue a minor in Irish-American Studies by tak- 
ing a combination of 18 credit hours consisting of two required 
courses (six credit hours) and four elective courses (12 credit 
hours) selected from the courses listed below. Students may take 
one elective (with approval of the co-directors) at another institu- 
tion (such as Boston College, University of Massachusetts-Boston 
or Stonehill College). At least nine credit hours must be taken at 
Bridgewater State College. 

The minor also sponsors summer programs in Ireland. 

Required Courses Credits 

INTD 216 Introduction to Irish-American Studies 3 

Three of the following courses 9 

ENGL 142 Irish-American Literature I (MCC) 
ENGL 143 Irish-American Literature II (MCC) 
ENGL 251 Literary Themes: Irish-American Literature 
HIST 221 Irish-American History Survey (MCC) 
ENGL 398 Film Study: Genres 
SOCI 225 Irish-American Experience 

Electives 

Choose two additional courses from above or from the 

lists below. No more than one course may be taken 

from each list below 6 



Irish Content Courses 

ENGL 381 Irish Literature I 

ENGL 382 Irish Literature II 

HIST 439 Topics: Ireland, 1798-1922 

HIST 2 1 1 History of Modern Ireland (MCC) 

ENGL 145 Seminar in Ireland: Irish life and Literature' 



(MCC) 



General Framework Courses 

ANTH/SOCI 315 Ethnic Experience in America 

ANTH 426 New England Ethnic and Regional Communities 

HIST 461 American Immigration and Ethnicity 

SOCI 312 Discrimination and Prejudice 

SOCI 426 Urban Enclaves 



* Note: two optional opportunities for travel to Ireland 
ENGL 145 Seminar in Ireland at University of Limerick (MCC) 
SOCI 399 Special Topics in Sociology: Out of Ireland - 

Understanding Three Centuries of Migration 

Total minimum credits: 18 
Students interested in the Irish-American studies minor should 
contact Dr. Walter Carroll of the Department of Sociology. 

LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN 
STUDIES MINOR 

The Latin American and Caribbean studies program at 
Bridgewater State College gives interested students the oppor- 
tunity to use the analytical tools of various disciplines to learn 
about the societies of Middle America, South America, and the 
Caribbean, including the Latin American diaspora in the United 
States and elsewhere. Students from any discipline may choose 
a minor in Latin American and Caribbean studies. By allowing 
students to develop an understanding of a region that is adjacent 
to the United States and increasingly integrated politically, eco- 
nomically and culturally, this minor will enhance their academic 
and professional preparation. 

Students seeking a minor in Latin American and Caribbean 
studies must complete 18 credits of courses in at least three 
disciplines from among the courses listed below. Students pursu- 
ing this minor are strongly encouraged to complete courses in 
Spanish, Portuguese or another language of the region, at least 
to the intermediate level. 

Anthropology 

ANTH 213 Latin American Peoples and Cultures 
t ANTH 399 Special Topics in Anthropology 

Geography 

GEOG 381 Geography of Latin America 

*t GEOG 550 Contemporary Issues in Geography 

History 

t HIST 439 Topics in Non-United States History 
HIST 477 Latin America: The Colonial Period 
HIST 478 Latin America: The National Period 
t HIST 495 Undergraduate History Colloquium 

* HIST 560 Topical Seminar: Latin America 

Spanish 

LASP 290 
LASP310 
LASP 320 
LASP 392 
LASP 402 
LASP 403 
LASP 490 
LASP 495 



Spanish Phonetics and Dialectology 
Contemporary Latin American Short Story 
Latin American Poetry 
Spanish-American Civilization 
Survey of Spanish-American Literature 
Topics in Spanish-American Literature 
Seminar in Hispanic Literature 
Seminar in Spanish-American Literature 

Political Science 

POLI 381 United States - Latin American Relations 
POLI 382 Latin American Government and Politics 
POLI 488 Politics and Development in the Third World 



INTERDISCIPLINARY AND PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

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223 



Interdisciplinary and 
Preprofessional Programs 



Social Work 

SCWK 270 Social Work Issues of Diversity and Oppression 

Total minimum credits: 18 

t Special topics courses that can be included in the minor, 
depending upon the specific topic covered, with prior 
permission of the Latin American and Caribbean Studies 
Program Coordinator, Dr. Sanra Faiman-Silva, Department of 
Anthropology. 

* Formal application required. See "Graduate and 
Undergraduate Credit" in the "School of Graduate Studies" 
section of this catalog. 



MIDDLE EAST STUDIES MINOR 

The Middle East Studies minor is an interdisciplinary minor 
encompassing six courses (18 credits). No more than two courses 
may be taken in one department. At least three courses (nine 
credits) must be taken at 300 level and above. Special topics 
courses can be included in the minor, depending upon the spe- 
cific topic covered with relation to the Middle Eastern region. 

Grade Requirement 

A grade of "C" or higher is required for all courses in the minor. 

Complete six courses (18 credits) from Credits 
the following 18 

ANTH 216 People and Cultures of the Near East 
ANTH 340 Myths and Peoples of the Ancient Near East 
ARTH 208 Survey of Islamic Art and Architecture 
ARTH 211 Monuments as Cultural Symbols and 

Emblems of Power 
ARTH 311 Orientalism 

*ARTH 414 Art History Study Tour (Turkey, Morocco) 
COMM 365 Introduction Intercultural Communication 
*COMM 430 Topics in Film: Iranian Cinema 
COMM 462 Patterns of International Communication 
GEOG 374 Geography of the Middle East 
*HIST 439 Topics in Non-United States History: 

The Islamic Religious Tradition 
HIST 474 Islamic Civilization to 1400 
HIST 475 The Modern Middle East 

* HIST 495 Undergraduate History Colloquium: 

Islamic History 
LAAR 101 Elementary Arabic I 
LAAR 102 Elementary Arabic II 
POLI 385 Government and Politics in the Middle East 
SOCI 214 Middle Eastern Societies 

* Special topics and study tour courses may be included in the 
minor, depending upon the specific topic covered, with prior 
consent of the Middle East Studies minor coordinator. 

Students interested in the Middle East Studies minor should con- 
tact Dr. Jabbar Al-Obaidi, Chairperson of Communication Studies. 

Total minimum credits: 18 



OCEANOGRAPHY 

Courses related to oceanography are offered as a coopera- 
tive effort of the Departments of Biological Sciences, Chemical 
Sciences, Earth Sciences and Physics. This emphasis is designed to 
prepare students for graduate studies in oceanography. 



Most graduate schools of oceanography require an under- 
graduate major in biology, chemistry, earth sciences or physics. 
All students interested in an oceanography program should 
major in one of these disciplines. Graduate schools of oceanog- 
raphy expect students to include most of the following courses 
(or comparable ones) in their undergraduate programs: Calculus 
and II, Chemical Principles I and II, Quantitative Analysis, Genera 
Physics I and II, Biology I, Biology II, Marine Biology, Physical 
Geology, Biological Oceanography and Physical Oceanography. 

These courses, together with one of the majors indicated 
above, provide the basic foundation for further study in one of 
the four principal branches of oceanography: biological ocean- 
ography, chemical oceanography, geological oceanography and 
physical oceanography. A student who is interested in oceanog- 
raphy should consult both his/her major adviser and one of the 
oceanography advisers before registering for courses in his/her 
freshman year or as soon as possible thereafter. Oceanography 
advisers are: Dr. Peter Saccocia (Earth Sciences); Dr. Frank Gorga 
(Chemical Sciences); Dr. John Jahoda (Biological Sciences). 



PREMEDICAL, PREDENTAL, 
PREVETERINARY AND OTHER MEDICALLY 
ORIENTED PROFESSIONS 

The Department of Biological Sciences can advise any college 
student interested in most of the medically oriented professions 
such as premedical, predental, preveterinary, physical therapy, 
osteopathic, chiropractic, podiatry and physician's assistant, as 
to recommended courses for each area, professional schools' 
requirements, how to apply and how to prepare for the MCAT, 
DAT, VCAT and GRE, where applicable. Pertinent information 
and guidance is available through the premedical adviser, Dr. 
Merideth Krevosky, in the Department of Biological Sciences. 

PRE-ENGINEERING 

Preprofessional training for students planning to enter engineer- 
ing schools is provided by Bridgewater State College. 

Engineering schools expect prospective students to have 
demonstrated competency in areas such as mathematics, physics, 
chemistry and computer science. 

Students who are interested in engineering should consult 
with Dr. Jeffrey Williams of the Department of Physics. 



PRELAW 

Advising for students considering entering law school after 
graduation is provided by Bridgewater State College. Law schools 
are generally seeking students with strong academic liberal arts 
backgrounds who have demonstrated a high degree of compe- 
tence in their ability to write with clarity, reason logically and 
analyze complex ideas. While law students come from a variety 
of majors, it is useful to have a balanced curriculum with some 
preparation in history, English, government and philosophy. 
Students interested in a legal career should consult with Dr. Mark 
Kemper of the Department of Political Science or Dr. Aeon Skoble 
of the Department of Philosophy. 



224 



INTERDISCIPLINARY AND PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 



Interdisciplinary and 
Preprofessional Programs 



i PUBLIC HISTORY MINOR 

A program of courses offered by the Departments of 
Anthropology, History, Sociology and Criminal Justice to provide 
students with education and training for professional positions 
in public institutions such as museums, government offices, 
historical societies, national parks and in business. The program 
is designed to serve the Southeastern Massachusetts region. 
Students will choose courses from those listed below. 

Required Courses Credits 

HIST 392 History Seminar 3 

HIST 493 Museum Management: A Practicum 3 

HIST 498 Internship in History 3 

; ANTH 103 Introduction to Archaeology 3 

ANTH 303 Archaeological Field Excavation in 

Prehistoric Sites in New England 3 

or 

ANTH 328 Archaeology of North America 

ANTH 410 Public Archaeology 3 

Electives (Choose one) 3 

HIST 440 Topics in United States History: Public History 
HIST 441 United States History: The Colonial 

Period 1607-1763 
HIST 461 American Immigration and Ethnicity 
HIST 464 New England Textile Communities: 

Social and Economic History 
POLI 277 American Government: State and Local 
SOCI 206 Cities and People: Urban Sociology 
SOCI 315 Race and Ethnicity in America 

Total minimum credits: 21 
For further information students should contact Dr. Leonid 
Heretz, Chairperson, Department of History. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS MINOR 

This public relations minor is offered as a cooperative effort of 
the Departments of Communication Studies, Management and 
English. It provides an opportunity for students to acquire knowl- 
edge and skills germane to public relations practice. Students 
take courses in management, advertising, public relations, mar- 
keting and business writing or elect presentational skills courses, 
for a total of 21 credit hours. 

Required Courses Credits 

COMM 226 Introduction to Public Relations 3 

COMM 391 Public Relations Practicum 3 

MGMT 130 Principles of Management 3 

MGMT 200 Marketing Principles (Prerequisite: MGMT 130 

and ECON 101 or ECON 102 or consent of instructor) 3 

MGMT 424 Advertising 3 

Elective Courses 

Choose one 3 

COMM 212 Announcing 

COMM 250 Public Speaking 

COMM 330 Business and Professional Communication 
Choose one 3 

ECON 101 Principles of Microeconomics 

ENGL 202 Business Communication 

Total minimum credits: 21 



Interested students should contact Dr. Thomas Mickey of the 
Department of Communication Studies. 

RUSSIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES 
MINOR 

The Russian and East European Studies is a multidisciplinary 
minor encompassing 18 credit hours to be selected from courses 
offered in the Departments of English, Foreign Languages, 
Geography, History, Political Science and Economics. The major 
purpose of this minor is to provide students with a deeper 
understanding of the Eastern European area (including Russia) 
and its culture. 

Each student must achieve proficiency in the Russian lan- 
guage (up to the intermediate level), but only six credits can be 
applied to the area program or any other Slavic language. Each 
requirement can be met by College-Level Examination Program® 
(CLEP) examinations. 

Three credits of each subject taken within the Slavic area stud- 
ies can also be applied to student's major. 

Students participating in the program are encouraged to go 
beyond the minimum requirements and take additional core 
curriculum requirement electives in this area. Additional courses 
can be taken with the approval of the Slavic Council at other 
Massachusetts State Colleges. 

Each student who completes the program will be cred- 
ited with a minor in the area, and in addition will receive "A 
Certificate of Completing Area Studies: Slavic." 

Required Courses Credits 

LARU 151-152 Intermediate Russian Ml 6 

HIST 436 History of East-Central Europe since 1918 3 

or 

HIST 435 History of the U.S.S.R. 

GEOG 380 Geography of Russia/C.I.S 3 

ECON 320 Comparative Economics 3 

POLI 275 Comparative Government 3 

Total minimum credits: 18 
For further details, contact the Department of History. 

URBAN AFFAIRS MINOR 

The college offers a multidisciplinary minor in urban affairs under 
the auspices of the anthropology, geography, economics, history, 
political science, psychology and sociology and criminal justice 
departments. The primary purpose of this minor is to provide 
students with a broader understanding of and sensitivity to the 
complex problems facing the urban environment through the 
combined efforts of different disciplines at the college. The minor, 
through its internship program, is designed to provide students 
with an opportunity for direct contact and work in fields such as 
urban planning, urban government, social welfare, social psy- 
chology and urban education. 

Some examples of internships, which are assigned according 
to the abilities, interests and background of the student and the 
current needs of the cooperating communities or agencies, are: 



INTERDISCIPLINARY AND PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

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225 



Interdisciplinary and 
Preprofessional Programs 



Department of Geography WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES MINOR 

City and regional planning; economic development, land use, Women's and gender studies at Bndgewater State College was 

environmental protection, transportation studies, cartography/ established in 1 983, and is part of a rapidly growing course of 

drafting, business/bank locations and market studies. study nationwide. Women's and gender studies is an interdisci- 

p. . * < u - ♦ plinary minor which combines the analytical tools of different dis- 
Department of History , u »u i u i ■ ■ ... 

r ' ciplmes such as anthropology, psychology, sociology, literature, 

Working with historical affairs commissions, assisting hjstory p hi | osophy( etc ( wnen studyjng the wor |d. 

community organizations in oral history projects and writing ... , . . .. , . , 

about local history Women s and gender studies is dedicated to the study of 

™ women and gender. Gender is the idea of difference between the 

School of Arts and Sciences sexes, and all the assumptions, stereotypes and expectations that 

Working in human services agencies, survey research in public accompany these ideas. The minor looks at women and gender 

institutions, work in community organizations and voluntary issues around the world ' but s,nce 9 ender does not 9 ,ve a fu " 

agencies understanding to women's lives, we consider other factors such 

as race, class, culture and sexuality. The minor combines these 
Option A Credits tools and areas of interest into what we call an "integrative anal- 
Four out of the following six courses 12 ysis." The objective is to introduce students to analytical tools 

ANTH 306 Urban Anthropology and basic approaches to the study of women in a variety of fields. 
ECON 350 Urban Economic Problems and Policies Students in the women's and gender studies have found that 

GEOG 353 Urban Geography a minor in women's and gender studies enhances their major 

POLI 376 Urban Politics curriculum by broadening their lens of inquiry, encouraging 

PSYC 210 Applied Social Psychology them to ask new and meaningful questions about women and 

SOCI 206 Cities and People: Urban Sociology men, and seeing the world in a more meaningful way. Students 

Internship: (six) credits (equal to eight weeks, of women's and gender studies go on to graduate school in 

full time or 16 weeks, half-time) 6 women's and gender studies and in other disciplines, become 

Total minimum credits (option A): 18 teachers, librarians, attorneys, writers, reporters, labor organizers, 

A q rm j iff social workers, counselors, ministers, performers, midwives, doc- 

Option B Credits . 7 

r tors and more. 

Four out of the six courses listed under Option A 12 

Two courses from the list below 6 Women's and Gender Studies Minor 

GEOG 354 Field Methods in Urban Geography Students are required to take six women's and gender studies 

HIST 462 American Labor History courses to complete the women's and gender studies minor, 

POLI 277 American Government: State and Local including the following. 
SOCI 312 Discrimination and Prejudice 

499 Directed Study in individual participating Credits 

departments WMST/INTD 240 - Critical Perspectives in Women's Studies .... 3 

Total minimum credits (option B): 18 15 credits selected from the list below of approved 

Courses taken to satisfy requirements of a major may not be women's and gender studies courses to include 15 

counted in the minor. Students interested in this program are Six credits in literature, history, philosophy and/or the arts 

encouraged to take their general education electives in the area Six credits in social sciences, behavioral sciences and/or 
of minority studies. natural sciences 

Students interested in this program should contact: Three credits of electives 

• Department of Geography NOTE: No more than two courses from the 1 5 credits may be 

. , _ .... taken in the same department. 

• Professor Jean Stonehouse, Department of History 

Anthropology 

ANTH 1 1 5 Anthropology of Race, Class and Gender 
ANTH 208 Anthropology of Women 
ANTH 314 Women in Myth and Lore 
ANTH 417 Seminar: She/He "Two Spirits" Gender Cross- 
Culturally 
ANTH 435 Seminar: Global Feminism 



226 



INTERDISCIPLINARY AND PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 



Interdisciplinary and 
Preprofessional Programs 



Art 

ARTH 308 Women in the Visual Arts 
English 

ENGL 327 Women Writers: The Female Tradition to1 900 
ENGL 328 Women Writers: The Female Tradition Since 1 900 
*Gender and Writing 

Foreign Language 

*Gender, Sexuality and Politics in Hispanic Cinema 
History 

HIST 421 European Women's History: Medieval Renaissance 

and Reformation 
HIST 466 Women in American History 

Interdisciplinary 

WMST/SCWK 304 The Psychosocial Development of Women 

* Directed Study in Women's Studies 

Photography 

ARTS 216 Photography I (Learning Community) 
Philosophy 

PHIL 210 Liberation Ethics 
PHIL 232 Philosophy and Feminist Thought 

Political Science 

POLI 476 Women and Politics 

Sociology 

SOCI 310 Women and Crime 
SOCI313 Family Violence 

SOCI 330 Women's Roles: Sociology of Sex and Gender 
*Feminist Theory 

Movement Arts, Health Promotion and Leisure Studies 

WMST/PHED 365 Women in Sports 
*Women's Health Issues 

Social Work 

SCWK 270 Social Work Issues of Diversity and Oppression 

* NOTE: Certain titles are offered under departmental topics 
courses and may be applied to the required electives upon 
approval of the women's studies coordinator. 

Total minimum credits: 18 
For additional information about the women's and gender stud- 
ies minor, contact Dr. Diana Fox, Department of Anthropology. 

WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES 
GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 

Required Course Credits 

INTD 501 Contemporary Women's and Gender Studies 

Seminar 3 



Electives 

Choose four course (12 credits,) from the following 72 

ANTH 417 Seminar: She/He "Two Spirits": Gender Cross- 
culturally 

ANTH 435 Seminar: Global Feminism 

ANTH 515 CD ROM: Teaching in Diverse Classrooms 

CNGC 529 Multicultural Counseling 

CRJU 521 Domestic Violence 

CRJU 522 Women and Criminal Justice 

CRJU 546 Class, Race, Gender and Crime 

CRJU 598 Internship in Criminal Justice 

ENGL 503 Directed Study * (maximum of 6.0 credits) 

ENGL 511 Special Topics in Writing t 

ENGL 580 Graduate Seminar in English Literature t 

ENGL 590 Graduate Seminar in World Literaturet 

HEAL 525 Women's Health Issues 

HIST 466 Women in American History 

LASP 490 Seminar in Hispanic Literature t 

LASP 520 Topics in Spanish-American Civilization t 

LASP 521 Topics in Spanish Civilizationt 

MGMT 571 Organizational Culture and Work Force Diversity 

PHED504 Nutrition for Sports, Exercise and Weight Control 

POLI 501 Introduction to Public Institutions and Administration 

POLI 503 Directed Study (maximum of 3.0 credits) * 

PSYC 503 Directed Study (maximum of 3.0 credits) * 

PSYC 508 Advanced Seminar t 

PSYC 516 Multicultural Counseling 

SCWK 500 Introduction to Social Welfare Policy: History, 

Programs and Issues 
SCWK 502 Dynamics of Diversity and Oppression 
SCWK 508 Introduction to Social Policy 
SCWK 510 Human Behavior in the Social Environment I 
SCWK 570 Integrative Seminar I 
SCWK 580 Special Topics t 
SOCI 503 Directed Study (maximum of 3.0 credits) * 
SOCI 516 Sociology of Sex and Gender 
* Limited to one three-credit Directed Study 

tCredit earned will count toward the Women's and Gender 
Studies Graduate Certificate only if a significant portion of the 
course content or internship is related to women and gender 
studies. A determination as to whether the course or internship 
meets this requirement will be made by the program coordinator. 
If the program coordinator concludes that the'course or intern- 
ship is not sufficiently related to women and gender studies, then 
the course or internship will not satisfy this requirement of the 
Women's and Gender Studies Graduate Certificate. 

NOTE: 400-level (U/G) courses are offered to graduate students 
who will complete them with additional assignments discussed 
with the professor, for graduate credit. 

For additional information about the women's and gender 
studies certificate program, contact Dr. Diana Fox, Department 
of Anthropology. 

Total minimum credits: 15 



INTERDISCIPLINARY AND PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

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227 



Course Descriptions 



bSc 

HH I IX. E WATER 

STATE COUX.E 



The course descriptions include all courses that are taught for aca- 
demic credit at the college. They are arranged in alpha-numerical 
sequence by course subject code At present, the majority of the 
500-600 level courses are offered in the evening hours Students 
should be aware that not all courses are offered in the evening 

Students who are only able to enroll in classes 4 pm or after should 
consult the appropriate department chairperson for information 
about the availability of evening sections of courses required in a 
specific major, concentration and/or minor. Students are urged to 
consult the Course Schedule each semester to determine when spe- 
cific courses are offered 



100 - 


299 


300- 


399 


400- 


499 


500- 


699 



COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM 

Introductory courses or courses normally taken 
during the freshman and sophomore years. 

Courses normally taken in the junior or senior 
years. 

Courses normally taken by seniors; open to gradu 
ate students if so noted in course schedule. 

Courses open only to graduate students. 

CORE CURRICULUM REQUIREMENT 
NOTATIONS 

Courses designated as satisfying core curriculum requirements 
are noted as such in the course description by a code (i.e., CSOC 
equates to Social or Behavioral Science) as outlined in this sec 
tion of the catalog. For a listing of core curriculum requirements 
and the academic categories under which they fall, please refer 
to the "Undergraduate Academic Programs" section of 
this catalog. 

PREREQUISITE NOTATIONS 

Prerequisites, if any, are indicated in the course description. 
Students must have the necessary prerequisite for each course. 
Prerequisites are indicated with the individual course listing and 
are enforced at the time of registration. Prerequisite courses 
taken at institutions other than Bridgewater State College must 
be documented (transcript or grade report, and in some cases 
course description) prior to registration. 

Students who wish to enroll in a course without the 
prerequisite(s) must obtain a Prerequisite Override form prior 
to registering for the course. The form must be signed by the 
chairperson of the department through which the course is 
offered and, in some cases, the instructor of the course. Students 
seeking an override of professional education prerequisites 
for courses taught through the School of Education and Allied 
Studies must complete a Request for a Student to Take an Upper 
Level Professional Education Course Without Formal Program 
Admission form and obtain all required signatures. 



SEMESTER NOTATIONS 

In some course descriptions, a semester designation indicating 
when the course can normally be expected to be offered is noted. 
This information is provided to assist students and their advisers 
in planning their programs. Please note, however, that all course 
listings published are subject to change, and that the college 
reserves the right to cancel courses or sections with inadequate 
enrollment. 



FORMER COURSE NUMBER NOTATIONS 

Some courses have had a recent change in their course number. 
The former number is noted in the course description. Credit will 
not be given for a course repeated under a different number 

CROSS-LISTED COURSES 

In some cases, a course in one discipline may be cross-listed with 
another course in a different discipline. Course descriptions will 
be listed under each course prefix in the appropriate discipline. 
For example, ECON/POLI 340 Law and Economics will be listed 
under ECON (Economics) and POLI (Political Science). Students 
may enroll in such courses under either discipline, but not both. 

MEETING TIMES 

Courses offered during evening hours normally meet once a 
week for a full semester or a quarter. Unless specified otherwise, 
day session courses meet for three 50-minute periods or two 75- 
minute periods per week for one semester. Departures from this 
rule, such as laboratory and studio periods and quarter courses, 
are indicated in the course description and in the schedule 
of courses. 



228 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www bndgew edu/catalog/addenda as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Course Descriptions 



Core Curriculum Course Notations 



Courses that satisfy the BSC core curriculum requirements are 
designated in the course description by one or more of the codes 
listed below. 

CODE REQUIREMENT(S) WHICH 

THE COURSE SATISFIES 



Core Skills Requirements 

CWRI 

CWR2 

CLOR 

CMAR 



CSPK 



Writing I 
Writing II 
Foundations of 

Logical Reasoning 
Foundations of 

Mathematical 

Reasoning 
Spoken 

Communication 



CWRT 

CSPI 

CGCL 

CMCL 

CQUR 

CUSC 



Seminars 

CFYS 
CSYS 



Writing Intensive 

Speaking Intensive 

Global Culture 

Multicultural ism 

Application of 

Quantitative Skills 

United States and 
Massachusetts 
Constitutions 



First Year Seminar 
Second Year Seminar 



Upper-level writing-intensive course in the major 



CWRM 



Core Distribution Requirements 



CFPA 

CHUM 
CNSL 

CNSN 

CSOC 



Fine and 

Performing Arts 

Humanities 

Natural Sciences- 
Laboratory 

Natural Sciences-Non 
Laboratory 

Social and Behavioral 
Sciences 



Upper-level writing- 
intensive course in 
the major 



Additional Distribution Requirements 



J 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



229 



Course Descriptions 



I 

Course Subject Code Key 



Accounting and Finance 


ACFI 


Health 


HEAL 


Anthropology 


ANTH 


High School Education 


EDHM, HSED 


Arabic 


LAAR 


History 


HIST 


Art 


ARTH, ARTS 






Athletic Training 


ATTR 


Information Systems 


COMP, MGMT 


Aviation Science 


AVSC 


Instructional Technology 


INST 






Interdisciplinary 


INTD. NSCI, 


Biology 


BIOE, BIOF, 




WMST 




BIOL 


Italian 


LAIT 


Business 


ACFI, MGMT 










Japanese 


LAJA 


CapeVerdean Creole 


LACV 






Chemistry 


CHEM 


Library 


LIBR 


Chinese 


LACH 






Coaching 


PHED 


Management 


MGMT 


Communications 


COMM 


Marketing 


MGMT 


Communication 


COMD 


Mathematics 


MATC, MATH 


Disorders 




Media 


MEDI 


Computer Science 


COMF, COMP 


Mental Health Counseling 


CNMH, CNGC 


Counseling (see Mental Health 


CNGC, CNMH, 


Middle School Education 


EDHM, MSED 


Counseling, Student Affairs 


CNSA, CNSG 


Music 


MUSC 


Counseling, School Counseling) 








Criminal Justice 


CRJU 


Natural Sciences 


NSCI 


Dance 


THEA, PHED 


Philosophy PHIL 








Physical Education 


PHED 


Early Childhood 


EC ED, ECPK 


Physical Geography 


GEOG 


Earth Sciences 


EASC 


Physical Science 


PHSC 


Economics 


ECON 


Physics 


PHYS 


Education (Master's Core) 


EDMC 


Political Science 


POLI 


Education (High School, 


EDHM, HSED, 


Portuguese 


LAPO 


Middle School, PreK-12) 


MSED 


Psychology 


PSYC 


Educational Leadership 


EDLE 






Elementary Education 


ELED 


Reading 


READ 


English 


ENGL 


Recreation 


RECR 


English as a Second 


ENSL 


Russian 


LARU 


Language 








Exercise Science/Health Fitness 


PHED 


School Administration 


EDLE 






School Counseling 


CNSG, CNGC 


Finance 


ACFI 


Secondary Education 




Foreign Languages 


LANG 


(See HSED, MSED, EDHM) 




(also see individual language) 




Social Work 


SCWK 


French 


LAFR 


Sociology 


SOCI 


Freshman Skills 


FRSK 


Spanish 


LASP 






Special Education 


SPED 


General Counseling 


CNGC 


Speech Communication 


COMM 


General Science 


GSCI 


Student Affairs Counseling 


CNSA, CNGC 


Geography 


GEOG 






German 


LAGE 


Theater Arts 


THEA 


Graduate Program Planning 


GRPP 










Women's and Gender Studies 


WMST 



230 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www bndgew edu/catalog/addenda as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



Course Descriptions 



ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE 
(ACFI) 

ACF1 100 Fundamentals of Financial Reporting 
(3 credits) 

This course provides a general introduction to financial reporting 
issues. The topics covered will be an introduction to the basic 
financial statements: income statement, balance sheet and the 
cash statement. It will also cover internal control, ratio analysis 
and the financial reporting of accounts receivable, inventory, 
long-term assets, liabilities and stockholders' equity. (CQUR) 

ACF1 150 Personal Finance (3 credits) 

This course examines a range of alternative investments with 
regard to risk and liquidity. It analyzes and compares such 
investments as real estate, business ownership, securities and 
other investment types, considering the effects of taxation 
and inflation. (CQUR) 



ACF1 199 First Year Seminar (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: Open to all freshmen with a writing placement score of 
3 or above or a SAT score of 500 or above. Students with 24 or more 
transfer credits will have this requirement waived 
First Year Seminars (FYS) are writing-intensive topic courses that 
introduce students to academic thought, discourse and practices. 
FYS courses prepare and orient students toward productive and 
fulfilling college careers by actively engaging them in a specific 
academic area of interest. Students will improve their writing, 
reading, research and basic information and technology skills 
while learning to work both collaboratively and independently. 
These courses will fulfill the First Year Seminar requirement and 
may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. Each 
course may fulfill different requirements and topics may change 
each semester. Only one FYS course may be taken for 
credit. (CFYS) 



ACFI 200 Financial Accounting (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: ACFI 100 

This course will develop the student's knowledge of both the 
preparation and use of financiafstatements as they relate to the 
fields of accounting and finance. Course coverage will include 
in-depth review of the accounting cycle, concentrating on the 
adjustment process and the articulation and preparation of the 
financial statements. The course will place emphasis on accounts 
receivable, inventory and cost of goods sold, property, plant and 
equipment, debt, equity and financial ratios and techniques to 
interpret the quality of earnings of publicly-held corporations. 
(CQUR) 



ACFI 240 Principles of Accounting I (3 credits) 

This course involves the preparation and analysis of accounting 
statements. Areas covered in detail include cash, receivables, 
merchandise accounting, internal control, inventory valuation 
and corporate financial reporting. Either semester (CQUR) 



ACFI 241 Principles of Accounting II (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: ACFI 240 

This course is a continuation of Accounting I. Areas covered 
include operating assets, property plant and equipment, current 
liabilities, long term liabilities, stockholder's equity and financial 
statement analysis. Either semester (CQUR) 

ACFI 298 Second Year Seminar (Speaking Intensive) 
(3 credits) 

Prerequisite: 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who have 

completed ENGL 101, and the speaking skills requirement. Students 
with 54 or more transfer credits will have this requirement waived. 

Cannot be taken if 299 is taken for credit. 

Second Year Seminars (SYS) are speaking-intensive topic courses 
that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the 
First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific 
academic area of interest and provide them with the opportu- 
nity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will 
improve their speaking, reading, research and basic information 
and technology skills while building the connections between 
scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. 
These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement 
and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. 
Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may 
change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken for 
credit. (CSYS) 



ACFI 299 Second Year Seminar (Writing Intensive) 
(3 credits) 

Prerequisite: 199; Open to all sophomores and juniors who 

have completed ENGL 101 and ENGL 102. Students with 54 or more 
transfer credits will have this requirement waived. Cannot be taken 
if 298 is taken for credit. 

Second Year Seminars (SYS) are writing-intensive topic courses 
that build on the academic skills and habits introduced in the 
First Year Seminar. SYS courses engage students in a specific 
academic area of interest and provide them with the opportu- 
nity to reinforce, share and interpret knowledge. Students will 
improve their writing, reading, research and basic information 
and technology skills while building the connections between 
scholarship and action that are required for lifelong learning. 
These courses will fulfill the Second Year Seminar requirement 
and may fulfill other requirements for the core curriculum. 
Each course may fulfill different requirements and topics may 
change each semester. Only one SYS course may be taken 
for credit. (CSYS) 



ACFI 305 Business Law I (3 credits) 

The course is a study of the law and the judicial process 
including tort law, criminal law, agency law, administrative law 
and constitutional law. The course emphasizes the common 
law of contracts. Either semester (CUSC) 



Note: See Catalog Web Addenda at www.bridgew.edu/catalog/addenda as that information supersedes the published version of this catalog. 



231 



BR I DOHA f ER 
STAT 1 OOLUOi 



Course Descriptions 



ACFI 340 Intermediate Accounting I (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: ACFI 241 

This course develops an understanding of generally accepted 
accounting principles, the conceptual framework and account- 
ing information systems. Financial statements, cash, temporary 
investments, receivables and inventories are studied in depth 
fa// semester (CQUR) 



ACFI 341 Intermediate Accounting II (3 credits) 

Prerequisite ACFI 340 

This course is a continuation of ACFI 340. Topics covered include 
a continuation of inventory valuation, the acquisition, use 
and retirement of fixed assets, intangible assets, current and 
long-term liabilities, retained earnings and capital stock. 
Spring semester (CQUR) 

ACFI 350 Managerial Accounting (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: ACFI 241 

A study of management's use of accounting information to 
make decisions related to planning, controlling and evaluating 
the organization's operations. The behavior and management 
costs, as well as techniques used to evaluate and control results 
of operations, are discussed. Topics include cost terminology, 
cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, job order costing, 
activity-based costing, segment reporting, budgeting, standards, 
performance measures and variance analysis, evaluation of 
decentralized operations and differential analysis techniques. This 
course is presented from the perspective of the user of account- 
ing information rather than the preparer of such information. 
Analytical problem-solving techniques and the use of electronic 
spreadsheets will be utilized as decision-making tools. Either 
semester (CQUR) 



ACFI 385 Managerial Finance (3 credits) 

Prerequisite. ACFI 241 

Provides understanding of the finance function and the responsi- 
bilities of the financial manager. Develops concepts and tools for 
use in effective financial decision- making and problem-solving. 
Covers ratio analysis, funds, flow, forecasting, current assets 
management, budgeting, credit services, formation and cost 
of capital and impact of operating and financial leverages. 
Either semester (CQUR) 



ACFI 400-401 Honors Tutorial (3 credits each semester) 

Prerequisite: Open to Commonwealth and Departmental 
Honors students 

Special topics in accounting and finance Three hourly meetings 
weekly. ACFI 400 Fall semester, ACFI 40 1 Spnng semester 

ACFI 402 Honors Thesis (3 credits) 

Prerequisite Open to Commonwealth and Departmental 
Honors students 

One-hour weekly meetings with the thesis director will culminate 
in an honors thesis. With the consent of the Departmental Honors 
Committee and the thesis director, this course may be extended 
into a second semester for three additional credits depending 
upon the scope of the project. 

tMay be taken for graduate-le\-el credit 



\ 



ACFI 406 Business Law II (3 creditst) 

Prerequisite: ACFI 305 

A study of the basic legal principles encountered in the various 
forms of business organizations and the study of the Uniform 
Commercial Code chapters on Sales, Commercial Paper, 
Bank Deposits and Collections and Secured Transactions. 
Spring semester 

ACFI 430 Cost Accounting I (3 creditst) 

Prerequisite: ACFI 340 

Basic cost concepts and cost procedures for manufacturing 
enterprises are studied. Job order product costing is emphasized. 
Topics include manufacturing cost-flow concepts, procedure 
and controls, factory and departmental burden rates and 
inventory-costing methods. Spring semester 

ACFI 445 Auditing (3 creditst) 

Prerequisite: ACFI 341; or may be taken concurrently with ACFI 341 

with consent of instructor 

The qualifications and professional code of conduct of the 
auditor are discussed. Attention is then focused upon auditing 
procedures, including the preparation of audit working 
papers and other steps required in the course of an audit. 

Spring semester 

ACFI 455 International Finance (3 creditst) 

Prerequisite: ACFI 385 

This course surveys the financial management of multinational 
corporations. After reviewing foreign exchange rate determina- 
tions, it then covers such timely topics as exchange risks, hedg- 
ing, interest rate arbitrage, insurance and guarantee programs 
and international capital markets. Analysis is made of multina- 
tional capital budgeting techniques, the cost of capital and 
working capital management in a multinational corporate 
setting. Fall semester 

ACFI 460 Advanced Accounting I (3 creditst) 

Prerequisite: ACFI 341 

This course covers accounting for investments, business 
combinations, segmental reporting of business entities and 
not for profit and government accounting. Fall semester 

ACFI 465 Options and Futures Markets (3 creditst) 

Prerequisite ACFI 385 and ACFI 490 
This course familiarizes the student with two little-known but 
potentially titanic markets in the securities industry. Both options 
and futures are the wave of things to come. The course begins 
with a historical account of the origins of the two markets and 
then an examination of the mechanisms of both markets. Much 
time is spent on hedging techniques and on the application of 
futures contracts to the food industries and to banking and life 
insurance. Spring semester 



Note: This section is arranged in course number order See pages 229-230 (course prefix key) for assistance in locating department sections. 



Course Descriptions 



ACFI 466 Federal Income Taxation I (3 creditst) 

Provides background in Federal Income Tax Law and the regula- 
tions of the Treasury Department. Deals primarily with the basic 
philosophy of taxation, taxable income, allowable deductions 
and gains and losses in sales and exchanges of property for the 
individual taxpayer. Emphasizes the development of the ability 
to utilize various references in dealing with tax problems. 
Discusses tax planning. Fall semester 

ACFI 467 Advanced Taxation (3 credits) 

Prerequisite: ACFI 466 

This course examines in gr